Bibliography of Fontaine and Maury Family Resources


Overview

The Society’s library is continuously building upon a bibliography of known resources on the Fontaine and Maury families. This bibliography is organized alphabetically by title or subject. Each resource includes full bibliographic information and a summary of the family information that it contains. This bibliography also includes references for conducting research on the Huguenot movement.


New entries are periodically added and are noted as New! in their title. The current New! entries were added in December 2015.


Please note that these resources are not available from the Society. To search, use the Find function from your toolbar.


If you know of other resources that could be added to this ever-growing list, please contact the Society’s librarian.




The Bibliography

A. B. Fontaine, Photographer in Columbus, Georgia, 1861-1862, 1866

Alfred B. Fontaine [previously incorrectly listed as “Albert” in this sentence], born around 1835 in Georgia, was a photographer in Columbus, Georgia, September 1861-1862 at 83 Broad Street, over Pemberton & Carter’s drugstore, in 1866 as Fontaine & Co. Also listed as Palace Dagerreian Rooms over the same drugstore. W. C. Sanders, 1817-1892, was artist at A. B. Fontaine’s. These entries included in E. Lee Eltzroth’s compilation, “Early Georgia Photographers, 1841-1861: A Biographical Checklist,” in the Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 44, Number 1, Spring 2008, pp. 47-86. Fontaine is mentioned on pages 59, 72, and 78. According to Winston Fontaine’s book, From Riches to Rags to Respectability: The History of a Fontaine Family and Kinfolks (Mobile: Alabama Ancestors, 1987), this is Alfred Battle Fontaine, son of Benjamin Bruton Fontaine and Susanna Eliza Beall Fontaine (pp. 128, 130).


Abram Maury, Justice for Lunenburg County, Virginia, 1771.

Abram Maury is listed in a Council document dated November 6, 1771, as being a justice for Lunenburg County, Virginia. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1652 - 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume I, published in Richmond, VA, in 1875. p. 265.


Abraham Maury, Elizabeth Marye on Spotsylvania Co., VA, Slave Owners’ List, 1783.

Abraham Maury appears on a list of slave owners in Spotsylvania County in 1783. He is listed as having 3 slaves. An Elizabeth “Marye” also appears on the same list with 4 slaves. “Slave Owners Spotsylvania County, 1783" published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 4, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1897. p. 295.


“Abraham and Winney Heath sale to Willie Grizzle, Warren Co., Georgia, 1797.”

Thomas Fontaine is listed in abstract of a sale from Abraham and Winney Heath to Willie Grizzle dated 1 June 1797 in Warren County, Georgia. Thomas Fontaine (1752-1808) is a son of Francis Fontaine (1697-1749) and his first wife, Mary Glenisson (d. 1733). This appears on pp. 188-189 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book A, page 577.


Abraham Maury in Revolutionary Army Orders, 1779.

Transcription of original Revolutionary Army Orders for the main army under Washington, in the collection in the Virginia Historical Society, include two that mention Abraham Maury. One is dated August 25, 1779, noting Maury was at a court martial on the 24th of a Lieutenant Smith of Colonel Putnam’s Regiment for taking several articles of plunder from a soldier during a stormy night. A footnote lists that Abraham Maury, 2nd lieutenant, 14th Virginia November 14, 1776; 1st lieutenant, December 8, 1777; regimental adjutant, January 1, 1778; of regiment designated, 10th Virginia, Sept. 14, 1778. Same for August 29, Maury set as a member of a court martial. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 18, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1910. pp. 312, 313.


Abraham Maury in Revolutionary Army Orders, 1779, continued.

In an order dated September 10, 1779, [Abraham] Maury is designated adjutant for the next day. The same in an order dated Saturday, September 18, 1779. Continuation of the transcription of “Revolutionary Army Orders for the Main Army under Washington, 1778-1779,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 18, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1910. pp. 429, 433.


Abraham Maury in Revolutionary Army Orders, 1779, continued.

Orders at Fort Montgomery dated Sunday, September 26, 1779, name Lt. [Abraham] Maury as adjutant for the following day. Same for the orders of October 4 and 8, 1779, designating him the following days. Continuation of the transcription of “Revolutionary Army Orders for the Main Army under Washington, 1778-1779,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1911. pp. 40, 42, 44.


Abraham Maury Qualified as a Colonel, 1778.

On November 12, 1778, Abraham Maury qualified as colonel. Included in the “Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 10, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1902. p. 322.


“Account of Deborah Outerbridge, Administrator of Leonard Outerbridge, Deceased, 1758.”

The “Fountain excrs” are listed among the named persons in the account of the estate of Leonard Outerbridge, deceased, of Craven County, North Carolina, dated 16 November 1758. This is presumably the executors for John Fontaine. Others named are “John Bouds, Carruther excrs., Munine’s accts, Joshua Bryant, Fisher’s Co., Thomas Graves, James Parkinson, John Callahan, Jno. Fonvielle, Peter Knight, Rev Mr. Reed, and Samll Cornell.” This abstract appears on page 22, entry 162, listed as page 192, in Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.’s book, Craven County, North Carolina, Volume I - 1737-1766 (Deeds, Wills, Inventories), published in Lawrenceville, Virginia, by the author in 2001. Mr. Bradley explains that the abstracts are from microfilm reel #C.028.80023 and a portion of reel #C.028.80024 at the North Carolina State Archives.


“An Act for Appointing Commissioners to Examine and State the Accounts of Provisions, and the Pay of the Militia, and of the Damages Done the Inhabitants of this Colony by the Cherokee and Catawba Indians – Mentions Abraham Maury, 1758.”

Abraham Maury is listed in this September 1758 act as commissioner for Halifax County, Virginia. Published in William Waller Hening’s The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws fo Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619, Volume 1, in New York by R. & W. & G. Bartow in 1823. p. 232.


“An Act for Dividing the County of Lunenburg, and the Parish of Cumberland – Mentions Peter Fontaine, 1752.”

This law specifies that Clement Reade and Peter Fontaine, gentlemen, of the county of Lunenburg, were authorized to demand and receive all debts by all persons owed to the county of Lunenburg and parish of Cumberland to ensure that payments went to the appropriate new jurisdictions. Passed on February 25, 1752. Published by William Waller Hening in The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619, Volume 6, in Richmond, VA, by Franklin Press, Printer, in 1819. p. 253.


“An Act for Dividing the County of Lunenburg, and Parish of Cumberland, and for Altering the Court-Day in the County of Halifax, Mentions Peter Fontaine the Younger, 1753.”

This law specifies that John Payne and Matthew Talbot the elder, gentlemen, of the county of Bedford, and Peter Fontaine the younger and Lyddal Bacon, gentlemen, of the county of Lunenburg, were authorized to demand and receive all debts by all persons owed to the county of Lunenburg and parish of Cumberland to ensure that payments went to the appropriate new jurisdictions. Passed on November 27, 1753. Published by William Waller Hening in The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619, Volume 6, in Richmond, VA, by Franklin Press, Printer, in 1819. p. 382.


“An Act for Establishing a Bank in the City of Richmond – Mentions Fontaine Maury, 1792.”

This act was reported in October 1792 and passed on December 23, 1792. It stipulated that the capital stock was to be raised by subscriptions, which would be raised under the supervision of a number of people in the State. These included Fontaine Maury, James Summerville, Stephen Lacoste, Robert Patton, and William S. Stone, all for Fredericksburg. Published in William Waller Hening’s The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619, Volume 1, in New York by R. & W. & G. Bartow in 1823. p. 599.


“An Act to Establish Several Towns, and for Other Purposes, Mentions John Fontain as a Trustee, 1791.”

This law creates the town of Martinsville from 50 acres in Henry County. The property was vested in eleven men, one being John Fontain, gentleman, as trustees. They were to lay out lots of one-half acre each to establish the town. Passed on October 16, 1791. Published by William Waller Hening in The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619, Volume 13, in Philadelphia, PA, by Thomas DeSilver, Publisher, in 1823. p. 297.


“An Act to Vest 300 Acres of Land, Devised by Zachary Crips, for a Glebe, in the Parish of Ware, in the County of Gloucester, in Trustees, to be Sold, and for Other Purposes Therein Mentioned – Includes Reference to Rev. James Maury Fontaine, 1769.”

The 300 acres were vested in Rev. James Maury Fontaine, Robert Throckmorton, Francis Tompkies, and Francis Whiting, gentlemen, of Ware parish. They, or any two of them, were authorized to sell the property, with the proceeds to go into trust to buy slaves, one half to be young females, to be annexed to the land for use by the property purchaser. Passed on November 10, 1769. Published by William Waller Hening in The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619, Volume 8, in Richmond, VA, by J. & G. Cochran, Printers, in 1821. p. 435.


Address Before the Philodemic Society by Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1846.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Prepared speech on Georgetown University for the D.C. Philodemic Society. Printed in Washington, D.C., by J. & G. S. Gideon in 1846. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Address Delivered Before the Literary Societies of the University of Virginia by Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1855.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Published in Richmond, VA, by H. K. Ellyson’s Steam Presses in 1855. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Address of Com. M. F. Maury before the Fair of the Agricultural & Mechanical Society of Memphis, Tennessee, 1871.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Speech given by Maury at the Memphis Fair Grounds on October 17, 1871. Published in Memphis by the Appeal Job Office in 1871. 22 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Address of the Honorable Abram P. Maury on the Life and Character of Hugh Lawson White.

Abram Poindexter Maury (1801-1848), son of Major Abraham Maury, served in the U.S. House of Representatives for the 8th District in Tennessee several times in the 1830s and 1840s. Hugh Lawson White succeeded Andrew Jackson to the U.S. Senate for Tennessee in 1825 and served until 1840. Published in Franklin, Tennessee by the Review Office, 1840.


Address on the Peculiar Advantages of the United States in Comparison with Other Nations.

Address by Abram Poindexter Maury (1801-1848), son of Major Abraham Maury, served in the U.S. House of Representatives for the 8th District in Tennessee several times in the 1830s and 1840s. Published in Nashville by W. F. Bang & Co., Printer, in 1847.


Address to the Graduating Class of Virginia Military Institute by Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1869.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Speech given by Maury on July 2, 1869. Published in Richmond, VA, by the Dispatch Steam Power Presses in 1869. 11 pages. Copy available in the Rare Book Collection at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, VA.


Advertisement by the Universal Publishing Co. of Modern College Textbooks, Including Maury’s ‘Geographies,’ 1898.

University Publishing Co. advertises modern college textbooks, including Maury’s Geographies. Included in the “Historical and Genealogical Notes” section published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1898. p. 199.


Advertisements by Several Maurys for Schools in Virginia, 1787, 1804, 1807.

An advertisement for Matthew Maury’s grammar school appeared in the October 18, 1787, issue of Virginia Independent Chronicle. Also cites an advertisement for a female school in Hanover County by Mrs. Maury published on February 14, 1804, in the Gazette newspaper. Also a citation for a December 18, 1807, advertisement in the Enquirer for a school at Green Springs by Maury. Included in an article “Some References to Colleges and Schools in Richmond Va. Newspapers,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 22, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1914. pp. 290, 292, 294.


Alexander Pope Married Martha M. Fontaine, Daughter of Aaron Fontaine of Louisville, 1803.

Alexander Pope, third son of William and Penelope Edwards Pope, was a prominent lawyer in Louisville, KY. He married Martha M. Fontaine on October 4, 1806. She was the daughter of Aaron Fontaine of Louisville. Alexander and Martha had five children: Henry; Fontaine; Maria; Martha; and Penelope. Continuation article on “Col. Nathaniel Pope and His Descendants,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 12, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1904. p. 250.


The Amazon, and the Atlantic Slopes of South America.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. A series of letters published in the National Intelligencer and Union newspapers, under Maury’s signature of “Inca.” The letters deal with Maury’s views of the Amazon River, Brazilian commercial policy, and trade in South America. Published by F. Taylor Washington in 1853. 63 pages. Available at the Virginia Military Institute library.


Ancestry and Descendants of Jesse Smith of Charleston District, S.C., and Lowndes County, Miss.

Alice Amis Hodges, Author. Includes histories of the Risher and Fontaine families. Self-published in 1978 in Pendleton, SC, by the author. 22 pages.


The Anderson-Fountain Descendants of Edward Power and Abigail Coker of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Containing the Diary of J. H. Parker of Cross County, Arkansas, July 1, 1874-February 25, 1877, and the Ancestry of Francis Cassie (Catt) Anderson of Cherry Valley, Arkansas.

This book documents the descendants of Solomon Fountain, b. ca. 1756 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, long believed to be a descendant of the Reverend Francis Fontaine. DNA testing conducted in 2007 confirms that Solomon Fountain was not a descendant of the Jaques Fontaine family, so portions of this book that document the early Fontaine family is incorrect as it relates to Solomon. W. Cary Anderson, Author. Self-published in Holyoke, CO, in 1970. 193 pages.


“Anglican Conformity and Non-Conformity Among the Huguenots of Colonial New York.”

Paula Wheeler Carlo, Author. Paper presented at the Strangers to Citizens Conference, London, on April 6, 2000. Privately published in 2000.


Ann Holmes Woolfolk Married William Grymes Maury; Names Her Parents, Her Children.

Elizabeth Power Brodnax, daughter of Henry Brodnax and his first wife, Ann Holmes, married John G. Woolfolk and they had three children. One was Ann Holmes Woolfolk, who married William Grymes Maury, with whom she had nine children: (1) Robert Henry Maury; (2) John Walker Maury; (3) William Lewis Maury; (4) Charles Brodnax Maury; (5) James Ludwell Maury; (6) Ann Hite Maury; (7) Lucy Pollard Hunton Maury; (8) Francis Maury (married James M. Burke); and (9) Maria Maury (married James Coleman). Continuation article, “Brodnax Family,” taken from Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, p. 431, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1905. p. 137.


Ann Hull Herndon Marriage with Cousin Matthew Fontaine Maury; Brief Biography.

Ann Hull Herndon (1811-1901) is listed as marrying her cousin, Matthew Fontaine Maury, in 1834. The article provides a brief biography of Maury: joining the U.S. Navy in 1825; his articles in the Southern Literary Messenger, which led to the creation of the U.S. Naval Academy; his 1842 appointment as superintendent of the Dept. of Charts and Instruments, which later became the Naval Observatory; his Physical Geography of the Sea; serving Virginia in the Civil War; his position with Maximilian of Mexico after the war; and his professorship of Physics at the Virginia Military Institute. Cites that his children are listed in Volume 5, New Series, pp. 128-131. Continuation of the article “A Genealogy of the Herndon Family” by John W. Herndon of Alexandra, VA, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 11, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in April 1904. pp. 449-450.


Ann ‘Overton’ Fontaine, born to Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell, April 19, 1796.

To Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell was born a daughter, Ann ‘Overton’ Fontaine, born April 19, 1796. Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 251.


The Annals and Parish Register of St. Thomas and St. Denis Parish, in South Carolina, from 1680 to 1884.

Robert F. Clute, author. This 2005 reprint of the 1884 edition has parish registers containing records of the French Huguenot settlement, the Orange Quarter, with 700 marriage records, 1,000 birth or baptismal records and 500 death or burial records, with 3,200 names. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Annals of Progress: The Story of Lenoir County and Kinston, North Carolina.

William S. Powell, Author. In a section on the history of towns and communities in Lenoir County, this books includes a brief description of Fountain Hill, which is in the northern part of the county on the Contentnea Creek. It was named for a local family whose ancestor, Francis Fountain (Fontaine), settled before 1769. This was Francis “Frank” Fontaine, II. Published in Raleigh by the North Carolina State Department of Archives and History in 1963, p. 4.


Announcement of the Death of Col. William Winston Fontaine, of Austin, TX; 1918.

In the “Necrology” section of the Society’s annual report, it lists that annual member Col. William Winston Fontaine of Austin, Texas, had died during the preceding year. In the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on March 18, 1918, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 26, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in 1918. p. xxxii.


Appraisal by Peter Fountaine and Clement Read of the Library of Rev. William Key, 1764.”

Reverend William Key was minister in Cumberland parish in Lunenburg County, where he died in 1770. An inventory of his estate was recorded on February 9, 1764, of a large library. It was appraised by Peter Fountaine and Clement Read. “Library of Rev. William Key,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1901. p. 168.


“Archibald Little Land Sale to Richard Hutcherson, Warren County, Georgia, 1810.”

Archibald Little appears in an abstracted transaction for land sale to Richard Hutcherson dated 31 December 1810. The property was originally granted to Peter Lawrence. Other previous owners were Hartwell Jones and Nathaniel Hutcherson. Adjoining landowner was Thomas Jones. Witnesses to the transaction were John Fontaine and James Pace. This John Fontaine is likely the son of Thomas Fontaine, John (1792-1866) later lived in Columbus, Georgia. This abstract appears on page 241 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, pages 425-426.


“Armistead Family - Bowles Armistead Married Mary Fontaine, daughter of Peter Fontaine.”

This article is a history of the descendants of William Armistead, son of Anthony and Frances (Thompson) Armistead of Kirk Deights, Yorkshire, England. Descendant Bowles Armistead, one of four children of William Armistead and Mary Bowles, married Mary Fontaine. She was the daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Winston) Fontaine. Bowles and Mary’s four children are listed: William Armistead (died unmarried); Peter Fontaine Bowles Armistead (married Martha Fontaine Winston); Mary Bowles Armistead (married Charles Alexander and then Dr. Wilson Cary Selden); and Elizabeth Armistead (married Ludwell Lee). Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 1, originally published in New York in 1907, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. pp. 12-13.


Armistead Family – Correction that Consul James Maury’s First Wife Was Named Catherine, Not Emily Rutger, Armistead, and They Had No Children.

Mr. S. Gordon Armistead wrote to correct the statement in Vol. 7, No. 1, of July 1898, about Emily Rutger Armistead marrying James Maury. He notes that her name was Catherine Armistead, and that she and Maury did not have any children. His five children were with his second wife. A continuation article, “Armistead Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 7, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1899. p. 185.


Armistead Family – Emily Rutger Armistead Married Consul James Maury; Her Nephew George Graham Armistead Married Alice Virginia Fontaine.

Robert Armistead, son of Captain Robert Armistead, married Louisa Westwood and had four children, one of whom, Emily Rutger Armistead, married James Maury, consul to Liverpool for 45 years. She died in Liverpool, and was the mother of 5 children. George Graham Armistead, son of Emily Rutger Armistead Maury’s brother Robert Armistead, married twice, first with Alice Virginia Fontaine on November 7, 1831. They moved to Florence, Alabama. They had four children, two sons and two daughters. George married a second time with Jane Forsyth.

A continuation article, “Armistead Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 7, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1898. pp. 22, 23.


“Armistead Family – Peter Fontaine Armistead Married Martha Fontaine Winston.”

Peter Fontaine Armistead, son of Bowles Armistead, married Martha Fontaine Winston, daughter of Isaac Winston. They had twelve children (nine are listed in the article). One was Peter Fontaine Armistead of Tuscumbia, Alabama. His son, Fontaine Armistead, married an Armistead relation, whose mother was Alice V. Fontaine. Alice was the daughter of Alice Berkeley and a Mr. Fontaine. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1898. p. 170.


Article by William Winston Fontaine on Mrs. Elizabeth Moore Macon.

William Winston Fontaine provided a transcript of Mrs. Elizabeth Macon’s will and also included a narrative on how he and Mrs. Mildred Campbell had examined the papers of their common ancestor, Colonel William Aylett, in 1858. He recounts their search and their findings. He mentions that the day and month of Mrs. Macon’s mother’s death is not known but that in John Fontaine’s journal, John Fontaine mentions that Col. Augustine Moore, Mrs. Macon’s father, had married again by November 1715. “Will of Mrs. Elizabeth Macon, Found in the Papers of Colonel William Aylett, of Fairfield, King William County, Va.,” contributed by William Winston Fontaine, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1906. pp. 265-267.


Audited Revolutionary War Account of Arthur Corbin – Includes Documents Signed by John Fontaine, Benjamin Bruton.

Records relating to Arthur Corbin’s service in the Revolutionary War found in the South Carolina Department of Archives and History in Columbia, SC. John Fontaine signed that he received one year’s interest of £5.0.11 on August 28, 1787. Fontaine signed another statement on July 3, 1789, for interest of the same amount. His signature was very poor. Corbin provided public service in 1782. The documents were witnessed by Benjamin Bruton. Documents found in the Combined Index to 28 Record Series, 1675-1929.


“B. B. Fountain Land Sale to George W. Hardwick, Warren County, Georgia, 1817.”

This is the second of two transactions recorded together in the Warren County deed book. B. B. Fountain (most likely Benjamin Bruton Fontaine (1795-1851) appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to George W. Hardwick dated 18 April 1817. Adjoining landowners were Thomas Fountain, Robert B. Beall, Robert A. Beall, David McCrary, William Porter, and Henry Peeples. The original grantees were Aly Mary, Darling McDaniel and Thomas Brannen; Peter Perkins is listed as deceased and had likely been an adjacent landowner. A prior landowner was Jethro Dardin. The witness to the transaction was James Neal. This appears to be a transaction between brothers-in-law, Benjamin Bruton Fontaine and his sister Mary Fontaine’s husband George W. Hardwick. Adjoining landowner William Porter was a son-in-law of John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 268 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, page 352.


“Ballard Family – Elizabeth Ballard Married Mose Fontaine; Sarah Ballard Married Abraham Fontaine.”

This article documents that in 1794 the children of Thomas Ballard of Charles City, deceased, include Elizabeth Ballard, wife of Mose Fontaine, and Sarah Ballard, wife of Abraham Fontaine. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 3, No. 3, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in January 1895. p. 208.


Barbara Carr Fontaine, born to Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell, December 25, 1794.

To Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell was born a daughter, Barbara Carr Fontaine, born December 25, 1794. Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 251.


Barbara Terrill, daughter of Richard Terrill of Louisa County, Va., Married Aaron Fontaine.

Richard Terrill of St. Martin’s Parish, Louisa County, Va., died around 1765. In the Goochland Parish Register is a record of the children of his daughter, Barbara Terrill, and her husband Aaron Fontaine. Barbara’s brother, Samuel Terrill, made his will in Louisa County in 1796 and names his sister Barbara Fontaine, wife of Aaron Fontaine. “The Terrill Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1905. p. 264.


The Barometer at Sea: The Southeast Trade-Winds of the Atlantic.

A book on trade winds. It includes Matthew Fontaine Maury’s nautical monographs and a letter from Admiral Octave Antoine Henri de Chabannes-Curton to Maury. Published in Washington, D.C., by the U.S. Naval Observatory in 1861. 20 pages.


The Barons of the Potomac and the Rappahannock, Mentions Rev. Francis Fontaine.

Moncure D. Conway, Author. Mentions that the first Episcopal clergyman in York Hampton, Virginia, was Rev. Francis Fontaine in 1722. This fact is mentioned in a book review in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 1, No. 1, published in July 1893, p. 346. Published in New York by The Grolier Club in 1892. 290 pages.


“Reverend Robert Barret – Co-Laborer with the Reverend James Maury.”

A history of the descendants of Robert Barret, who was known to be a sailor in the Royal Navy in 1567. Reverend Robert Barret (1710-1797) of Hanover County, Virginia, was a co-laborer with the Reverend James Maury, usher of William & Mary College in 1729. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 6, originally published in Baltimore in 1917, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 275.


The Battle of Williamsburg and the Charge of the 24th Virginia, of Early’s Brigade.

Richard Lancelot Maury, Author. Civil War paper written for the Southern Historical Society and published in its papers for 1880 by Johns & Goolsby, Printers, in Richmond. 20 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Beara: A Journey Through History.

Daniel M. O’Brien, Author. Includes an article on Jacques Fontaine who lived on the Bear (or Beara) Peninsula. Published in Cork, Ireland, by the Beara Historical Society in 1992. 188 pages.


Béara and Bantry Bay History of Rossmacowen.

Richard S. Harrison, Author. History of the area where Jacques and Anne Fontaine lived when in Cork. Published by the Rossmacowen Historical Society in 1990. 236 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth-Century Paris.

Barbara B. Diefendorf, Author. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1991. Extensive bibliography and indexed. 272 pages.


“Benjamin B. Fontaine, Attorney, Mobile, Alabama.”

Benjamin B. [Bruton] Fontaine served as attorney for Revolutionary War veteran Benjamin Bruton (1761-1842), receiving Bruton’s pension on his behalf as Bruton lived in Sumter County, Alabama. Fontaine appears in pension files for receiving payments in 1837 and 1838. Copies obtained from Record M368 Hazel Coyne Papers, 1099-1994, Box 6, Folder 3: Benjamin Bruton, located in the Prescott Memorial Library in Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana, pages 47-51 of 73 pages in folder. These payment details are not in Benjamin Bruton’s compiled service record but must be drawn from a separate National Archives record group for pension payment records. Benjamin Bruton Fontaine (1795-1851) was a son of Thomas Fontaine of Warren County, Georgia, and moved to Mobile, Alabama.


“Berkeley Manuscripts – Reverend Francis Fontaine Witnessed Joseph Walker Will, 1723.”

The will of Joseph Walker, Esq., signed on November 9, 1723, in York County, was witnessed by Francis Fontaine, William Hewitt, Rebecca Cobb, and James Hewitt. In part of his will, he stated: “I desire twelve Rings, of sixteen Shillings value each, may be sent for and distributed to each of my executors, to each of my sons and daughters; one to the Rev. Mr. Emanuel Jones, and to the Reverd. Mr. Francis Fontaine.” Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1898. pp. 150-151.


“Bernard, Todd Query – Response from William Winston Fontaine.”

Letter from William Winston Fontaine of Austin, Texas, responding to a previously published query about the parentage of Elizabeth Bernard Todd. Fontaine provided information on her parents based on notes that his father, William Spotswood Fontaine, took in 1833. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 19, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1911. p. 200.


Bible Records of James Maury, 1746-1820, 1st American Consul, Located in Savannah.

In a letter dated October 14, 1918, Joseph Leidy, of 1319 Locust Street, Philadelphia, wrote that the Bible of James Maury, 1746-1820, 1st American Consul to Liverpool, England, and son of the Rev. James Maury (1717/8 - 1769), defendant in the 1765 case “Parson’s Cause,” is in the possession of Mrs. John Morris, at 208 East 34th Street, Savannah GA. She is a direct descendant. He wrote this letter, as many people are interested in the names in the Bible, particularly of the ancestors of the Rev. James Maury’s wife Mary Walker, 1724-1793. The article includes a transcription of all the Bible entries, including his parents and grandparents, and all of the children of the Reverend James Maury and his wife Mary Walker. Published under the heading “Maury Bible Records” in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 27, Nos. 3 and 4, in Richmond, VA, covering July and October 1919. pp. 375-376.


Bible Records of the Reverend James Maury (1718-1769).

James Maury (1718-1769) family Bible, includes birth, marriage, and death dates in his immediate family, including names of his parents Mathew Maury and Mary Ann, his wife Mary Maury, daughter of James Walker and Anne his wife, his wife’s brother Leonard James Walker, his marriage date of November 11, 1743, and the births and some deaths of his children. “From Bible Records of Rev. James Maury,” contributed by Miss S. Jaquelin Davison, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1901. pp. 122-123.


Bibliography of Commander Mathew Fontaine Maury.

Ralph Minthorne Brown, Author. Published in 1930 in Blacksburg, VA, by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Another edition was published in 1944. 61 pages.


A Blessed Company: Parishes, Parsons, and Parishioners in Anglican Virginia, 1690-1776.

John K. Nelson, Author. This wonderfully detailed book includes a number of references to early Fontaines and Maurys and includes a section on “the Fontaine-Maury family.” This book is very well documented and contains as many family details in the end-notes as in the text. Chapel Hill, N.C., and London: The University of North Carolina Press. 2001. 477 pages, fully documented with end notes and indexed.


Blood & Belief: Family Survival and Confessional Identity Among the Provincial Huguenot Nobility.

Raymond A. Mentzer, Jr., Author. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press. 1994. Includes a bibliography and index. 272 pages.


Book Review of Charles Lee Lewis’s 1926 biography, ‘Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas.’

A favorable book review by Daniel Grinnan of Charles Lee Lewis’ biography, Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas (Annapolis, MD: U.S. Naval Institute). Lewis was an associate professor at the U.S. Naval Academy. The review was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 36, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1928. pp. 303-304.


“Book Review of ‘Descendants of Mordecai Cooke, of Mordecai’s Mount, Gloucester County, Virginia, 1650, and Thomas Booth, of Ware Neck, Gloucester County, Virginia, 1685.’”

Dr. and Mrs. William Carter Stubbs, Authors. This family history book contains much information on other families with connections to the Cooke and Booth families, including the Fontaine family. This fact is included in a book review published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 32, No. 1, published in January 1924, p. 111. Published in New Orleans by the authors in 1923. 282 pages.


Book Review of ‘The Edward Pleasants Valentine Papers.’

These extensive papers contain a great deal of information on Virginia families, including the Fontaine, Izard, Pasteur, Winston, and other families. The Fontaine family chapter contains a chronicle of Virginia records pertaining to Fontaine family members, organized by county. A book review of this multi-volume series was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 37, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in July 1929, p. 384. Published in Richmond, VA, by the Valentine Museum. 4 volumes, 2,768 pages, includes genealogical tables and a full index.


Book Review of Richard L. Maury’s Book on His Father’s Work During the Civil War.

A very brief review of Richard L. Maury’s book, A Brief Sketch of the Work of Matthew Fontaine Maury During the War of 1861-65, about his father Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury’s work during the Civil War, especially pertaining to torpedoes and floating mines. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 23, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1915. p. 336.


Book Review of ‘Some Notable Families of America’ that Mentions the Maury Family.

In a book review of Anna Robinson Watson’s book, Some Notable Families of America (New York, 1898), it notes that most of the families are of Virginia origins, including the Lewis, Meriwether, Walker, Maury, and Thornton families. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1899. p. 136.


“The Botetourt Prize Medals; Walker Maury the Recipient for Classics in 1774.”

Lord Botetourt, when governor, awarded two gold medals for four years as prizes for students at William and Mary College. The medal for excellence in classics was awarded in 1772 to James Madison and in 1774 to Walker Maury. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 3, No. 2, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in October 1894. p. 144.


“Boursiquot Family and Jaques Fontaine.”

This article provides a brief history of the family of Anne Elizabeth Boursiquot, wife of Jaques Fontaine and daughter of Aaron and Jeanne (Guillot) Boursiquot. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 22, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in April 1914. pp. 196-197.


“Brent Town, Ravensworth and the Huguenots in Stafford.”

This article by Fairfax Harrison includes an endnote that references Richard Lancelot Maury’s paper, The Huguenots in Virginia. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 5, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1924, p. 184.


Brief Biography of Reverend Walker Maury (1752-1788).

John Randolph was sent to Walker Maury’s school in Orange County. In a footnote, details are given about Maury’s life. He was son of the Reverend James Maury and Mary Walker, born in Fredericksville Parish of Louisa County on July 21, 1752. He entered William and Mary College in 1770 on the Nottoway Scholarship, and on December 12, 1772, was promoted by the Faculty to the Philosophy Schools, from which he graduated in May 1775. In May 1774, he received the Botetourt gold medal for the encouragement of classical learning. He taught school in Orange County, where John Randolph of Roanoke was one of his students. When the Grammar School at William and Mary was discontinued in 1779, he moved to Williamsburg to have a grammar school of his own. This school had, in addition to the principal and four ushers, an attendance of 100, including John Randolph and his brothers. In 1786 Maury moved to Norfolk where he was principal of an academy there and made an annual profit of £200. He did not live long to enjoy his success, as he died on October 11, 1788. He had married Mary Grymes, daughter of Benjamin [incorrect] Grymes and Mary Dawson. The article also provides details on his parents and their ancestry. “School Days of John Randolph,” taken from Hugh A. Garland’s 1851 book, Life of John Randolph of Roanoke, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 24, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1915. pp. 1-2.


A Brief Sketch of the Work of Matthew Fontaine Maury During the War, 1861-1865.

Richard Lancelot Maury, Author (and son of Matthew Fontaine Maury). Published in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson in 1915. 36 pages.


“The Brooke Family – Cites William Brooke, son of Robert Brooke, Married a Miss Fontaine.”

An article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, cites that William Brooke, son of Robert Brooke, Jr., had two children with his wife, a Miss Fontaine, who was a descendant of John de la Fontaine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 17, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1909. p. 201.


“The Brooke Family of Virginia – William Brook Married a Miss Fontaine.”

William Brooke, who left a will dated April 4, 1734, was the nephew of Robert Brook, Jr., who married a Ms. Fontaine. Robert Brooke was a Knight of the Golden Horseshoe. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 12, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1904. p. 217.


Cabells and Their Kin.

Alexander Brown, Author. William Cabell of Nelson County was born in 1759. He went first to private schools taught by Rev. William Fontaine and Mr. Robert Buchan, and then in 1777 he attended the Hampton-Sidney Academy. This book was originally published in 1895 and then again in 1939. This edition was published in Franklin, North Carolina, by the Genealogy Publishing Service in 1994. 641 pages.


Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts from May 16, 1795, to December 31, 1798, Embracing the Letters and Proceedings of the Committee of Correspondence and Inquiry of Virginia and the Other Colonies from March 12, 1773, to April 7, 1775; also the Journal of the Committee of Safety of Virginia from February 7, 1776, to July 5, 1776, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond – References to Captain William Fontaine, John Fontaine in Prince Edward County.

These papers contain eight references to warrants granted to individuals from whom Captain William Fontaine obtained rifles; was granted provisions; and took an oath when he obtained his Continental Army Commission, pp. 112, 119, 121, 138, 186, 201, and 205. Records the death of John Fontaine in Prince Edward County in court records of June 15, 1795, p. 258. Published in Richmond, VA, Volume 8, in 1890.


Captain John Fontaine Esquire, Resigns, John Alexander Replaces Him, (ca) June 1781.

John Fontaine, Esquire, and Captain, resigned his position, and John Alexander was appointed in his place. This presumably happened in June 1781 or earlier. Continuation of article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1902. p. 142.


Captain Maury’s Letter on American Affairs.

Letter by Matthew Fontaine Maury. Pamphlet also includes an address by the Honorable John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) to the people of Kentucky. Pamphlet believed to have been published in Baltimore in 1861. 16 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Catalogue or Bibliography of the Library of the Huguenot Society of America.

Julia P. M. Morand, Author. This is a 2013 print of the 2nd edition published in 1920 that contains a list of the books, pamphlets, magazines, and other items held by the Huguenot Society of America library in New York City in 1920. The 1920 edition was roughly three times the length of the 1890 first edition. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Catherine Maury of Albemarle County Married William Lightfoot.

Catherine Maury of Albemarle is listed as marrying William Lightfoot, who was a son of William Lightfoot, vestryman from 1752 to 1758, who moved to Broomfield parish in what is now [1894] Madison County, Virginia. Cited in an article by the editor, “Lightfoot Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 2, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in January 1894. pp. 205-206.


Challenges to William Winston Fontaine’s Analysis of the Origins of Colonel Augustine Moore.

Browning wrote an article on Colonel Augustine Moore, in response to earlier writings by Colonel William Winston Fontaine of Austin, Texas, correcting what he noted as errors in Fontaine’s research. “Colonel Augustine Moore, of ‘Chelsea,’” contributed by Charles H. Browning, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 16, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1907. pp. 122, 124.


Changing Identities in Early Modern France.

Michael Wolfe, Editor. Addresses a wide range of issues pertaining to French history, including the Huguenot movement, covering the period 1328 to 1600. Includes a bibliography and index. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 1997. 410 pages.


“Charlottesville, Virginia, and the American Revolution, 1775-1783.”

This article was written by Glenn Curtis Smith of Madison College. He reported that in 1775, the men of Albemarle County discussed the ways and means to keep open the lines of communication with the settlements in the Tidewater area. The problem was solved by these men, among them members of the Lewis, Maury, Bruce, Carr, Gilmer, and Jefferson families, who obligated themselves to take turns riding weekly for papers and letters. A fine of £5 was assessed on any individual who failed to take his scheduled turn. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 24, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1943. p. 177.


“Christian and Historical Facts and Fallacies Put Forth By Our Government in Four Speeches.”

Comments on Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles’ speech on Memorial Day 1942, in which Welles mentioned the early visions of Matthew Fontaine Maury for a federation of shipping interests, to look beyond just our own country. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 24, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1943. p. 165.


“Churchill Family – Betty Carter Churchill Married Rev. James Maury Fontaine, 1777.”

William Churchill and his first wife were the parents of Betty Carter Churchill, who married Rev. James Maury Fontaine (b. 1738) in December 1777. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1899. p. 50.


Circuit Court Order on Spotswood Estate.

Henderson County, Kentucky, Deed on FHL film 572,579. “O-462: Whereas on 16 Oct. 1823, Union Co. circuit court ordered that of the estate of Alexander Spotswood, George W. Spotswood, William Spotswood, Bushrod Washington Jr. and wife Henryetta late Spotswood, (blank) Taliaferro and wife Ann W.B. late Spotswood, Martha Ann Spotswood and other unknown heirs of Alexander Spotswood decd, and George Spotswood and William Spotswood exec. of estate of Alexander Spotswood decd; and Philip H. Jones late of "your" bailiwick; you cause to be (collected) $1000 which lately in Union Co. was decreed to Edmund Rice, James Rice, William McCormack & wife Mary, Nathaniel Cowan and wife Sally, Sally Ann Rice and John Rice as heirs of John Rice decd, and Clement Buckman for debt; to satisfy debt a tract of land in Henderson Co. on Highland Creek patented in name of Fountain Maury be sold; the highest bidder on 11 Nov. 1823 was William Grundy for $5; Grundy died leaving Robert E. Grundy his sole heir at law; Robert likewise died intestate without issue, leaving widow, uncles and aunts and their descendants and his grandmother his heirs at law; this indenture 2 April from present sheriff of Henderson Co. to (1) Margaret K. Johnson, widow of Robert E. Grundy but who has since intermarried with (blank) Johnson; (2) the following heirs of Caroline Myers who was sister of William Grundy: Pheby Dorsey, Elizabeth Adams, Nancy Adams, John G. Myers, William Myers, Robert M. Myers, Thos. D. Myers, F.R. Myers; and following grandchildren of Caroline Myers by her son Jacob Myers deceased: Emeline Myers, Jacob F. Myers, Susan E. Brown, Mary Jane McClain, Caroline S. Casey, Rebecca A. Russell; (3) Nancy Duncan another sister of William Grundy decd; (4) Jane McElroy another sister of said William Grundy decd; (5) the grandchildren of Polly Rutter another sister of William Grundy by her deceased daughter Mary Jane Welden: Eliza Jane Welden, William Welden, and the other unknown heirs of Mary Jane Welden; (6) the following: the widow and heirs of George Grundy deceased another brother of William Grundy, to wit, Mary H.S. Grundy, William F. Grundy, Martha Terrell, George B. Grundy, Susan M. Grundy, Robert Grundy, Thomas D. Grundy, Samuel H. Grundy; (7) Mehala Cambron another sister of William Grundy decd; (8) Rosanna Jones, maternal grandmother of Robert E. Grundy; (9) the following maternal uncles, aunts and their descendants of said Robert E. Grundy: Levi Jones (10) Leonard Jones (11) Fielding Jones (12) Henry L. Jones (13) Mary Ann Lowry (14) the children and heirs of Laban Jones, to wit, Rosanna Jones, Robert W. Jones, John P. Jones and Gabriel C. Jones; (15) the unknown heirs of John Jones decd; deed for land on Highland Creek patented in name of Fountain Maury? 2 April 1853.” (numbers appear in original deed).


Civil War Experiences of the Family of William Winston Fontaine, with Details of His Fontaine Ancestry Back to the Reverend Peter Fontaine.

William Winston Fontaine mentions his father, William Spotswood Fontaine and his brother Charles Fontaine. He then provides many details on his line of ancestry, beginning with the Reverend Peter Fontaine, thru Peter’s son Colonel Peter Fontaine (1721-177?) of “Rock Castle” in Hanover County and his wife Elizabeth Winston, and his son Colonel John Fontaine (1750-1792) and his wife Martha Henry, daughter of Patrick Henry. William then provides details on Colonel John’s son, Captain William Winston Fontaine (1786-1816) and his wife Martha Dandridge, and then their son Colonel William Spotswood Fontaine, the author’s father. His father married his second cousin, Sarah Shelton Aylett, another daughter of Patrick Henry. The author then provides many details of his family’s experiences during the Civil War. “Some Virginia Families – Moore, Bernard, Todd, Spotswood, etc.,” contributed by William Winston Fontaine, based in part on notes by his father, William Spotswood Fontaine, on the Moore family, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 19, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1911. pp. 177-184.


“Claiborne Genealogy – Daniel Claiborne Married Mary Maury, Daughter of Matthew Maury and Mary Anne Fontaine.”

Augusta Sherwin Tatum, Author. Article covers the history of the Claiborne family. Cites that Daniel Claiborne, son of Thomas Claiborne, Jr., and Anne Fox, married Mary Maury, daughter of Matthew Maury and Mary Anne Fontaine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 2, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1894. pp. 217-218.


“Claiborne of England and Virginia – Daniel Claiborne Married Molly Maury.”

An article on the history of the Claiborne family. Daniel Claiborne (died 1790), one of eleven children of Captain Thomas Claiborne (1680-1732) and Anne West (1684-1733), married Molly Maury. Published in John Bennett Boddie’s book, Virginia Historical Genealogies, originally published in Redwood City, California, in 1954, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1965. p. 40.


“Coat-of-Arms in Virginia, Mentions Fontaine, Maury Families.”

This article mentions that York records mention the coat-of-arms of the Fontaine family. The Maury family is also listed, with a note to consult Huguenot Emigrants. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 1, No. 2, published in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in October 1892. p. 116.


“The Cocke Family of Virginia; Mentions Other Huguenot Families Fontaine, Maury.”

Article mentions that the Fontaines and Maurys were among the prominent Huguenot families who settled in Virginia. Dr. Daniel Coxe of London was one of the most active promoters of the Huguenot settlement at Mannikin Town in Virginia. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 4, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1897. p. 432.


The Collections and Recollections of William A. Maury.

Alice Maury Parmelee, Editor. William Arden Maury (1832-1918) was an Assistant Attorney General of the United States, a professor of law at Columbia College, and veteran of the Confederate Army. Book self-published by his daughter, Alice Parmelee, in Washington in 1938. 69 pages.


“Colonel William Campbell (1755-1823); Daughter Virginia Married Leonard Hill Maury.”

Mrs. P. W. Hiden of Newport News, Virginia, Author. Colonel William Campbell and his wife, Susan Pierce, had 13 children. The eldest was Virginia Campbell, who was married on January 27, 1803, with Leonard Hill Maury (born 1780), son of Walker Maury (1752-1788) and Mary Grymes (1753-1839). Walker Maury was the son of James Maury and Ann Walker, daughter of James Walker and Ann Hill, who was a daughter of Leonard Hill. Leonard and Virginia moved to Barren County, Kentucky, in 1808, where Leonard struggled at farming and later established a school like that of his father. They had one known child, James Ludwell Maury, born May 27, 1810. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 17, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1936. p. 175.


“Colonel William Campbell’s Descendants in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.”

Mrs. Mary S. Green Edmunds of Washington, D.C., Author. She documents that Colonel William Campbell and his wife, Susan Pierce, were the parents of Mildred Pierce Campbell (born 1792), who married a Mr. Maury [this was Leonard Hill Maury]. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 17, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1936. p. 256.


“A Colonial Scottish Jacobite Family: Establishment in Virginia of a Branch of the Humes of Wedderburn.”

Edgar Erskine Hume, Author. Includes a reference to John Fontaine’s chronicling of the 1716 expedition of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 38, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1930. p. 120.


The Confederate Diary of Betty Herndon Maury.”

There are two published versions of this diary by the daughter of Matthew Fontaine Maury, first is by Alice Maury Parmalee, Author. Self-published in 1938 in Washington, D.C., by the author. 56 pages. The second is a new version annotated by Carolyn Carpenter and accompanied by a Who’s Who identifying people mentioned by Betty in her diary was published in 2010 in Volume 9 of Fredericksburg History and Biography, pp. 9-121, and available from the Central Virginia Battlefield Trust.


Confession and Community in Seventeenth-Century France: Catholic and Protestant Coexistence in Aquitaine.

Gregory Hanlon, Author. Covers French history, the Catholic Church, and the Huguenots in Aquitaine. Includes a bibliography and index. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 1993. 312 pages.


The Constitutional Aspects of the “Parson’s Cause.”

Arthur Pearson Scott, Author. An analysis of the impact of the Parson’s Cause, Patrick Henry’s first case. Reverend James Maury was the defendant in the case. Published in New York by Ginn & Company in 1916. 577 pages.


“Contee Family – Henrietta George Brooke Married Fontaine Maury.”

This article provides a history of the descendants of Colonel John Contee (died 1708) who settled in Maryland. He was part of a French Huguenot family who settled in Barnstaple, England, after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Henrietta George Brooke (born 1873), one of five children of Florence Contee (born 1841) and Thomas Blake Brooke, married Fontaine Maury. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 2, originally published in Baltimore in 1911, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 199.


The Cradle of the Republic: Jamestown and James River.

Lyon Gardiner Tyler, Author. In his chapter on ministers, Tyler wrote that Rev. Peter Fontaine was minister at Jamestown for six months after his arrival in Virginia in 1716. He was son of Rev. James Fontaine, a French Huguenot. Peter left Jamestown for Westover Parish, in Charles City County, where he was a close friend of Colonel William Byrd. In 1728-29, he was the chaplain to the Virginia Commission which ran the boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina, the history of which is written by Colonel Byrd. Peter died in July 1757. In his section on Kecoughton, or Hampton, Tyler mentions that when John Fontaine visited Hampton in 1716, it was a place of over 100 houses but it had no church. Published in Richmond,VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in 1900. 187 pages, indexed.


Culpeper: A Virginia County’s History Through 1920.

Eugene M. Scheel, Author. Mentions John Fontaine’s visit to Fort Christanna in early April 1716 with Virginia Governor Spotswood. Fontaine documented this visit in his journal, which is the only written account of a Manahoac-related Indian tribe of Culpeper. Three weeks later, Fontaine joined the Governor and others in an expedition to the Blue Ridge [the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe expedition]. Fontaine also provides the first description of the Germanna settlement when he wrote of it in his diary in 1715. Published in Culpeper by the Culpeper Historical Society in 1982. pp. 4, 15, and 17-18.


“The Curtis Family – Letter from William Winston Fontaine.”

A letter submitted by William Winston Fontaine of Galveston, Texas, commenting on recent articles on the family of Major Thomas Curtis, emigrant to Virginia, on whom Fontaine was doing research. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1906. p. 92.


Dabney H. Maury Letter Regarding His Maternal Grandparents Betty Brooks, Fontaine Maury, 1893.

Cites a letter to the author of the article by the late General Dabney H. Maury dated October 21, 1893, in which Maury clarified that the only sister of Judge Brooks was Betty Brooks, who married Fontaine Maury. His mother, Eliza Maury, and Richard Brooks Maury were the only surviving children. Fontaine Maury built the house in Fredericksburg where Lawrence Brooks died and his mother was born. Listed under “Brooke” in “Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 12, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in July 1904. p. 93.


Dabney H. Maury’s Brooks, Taliaferro Ancestry.

Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Richard Brooke of “Smithfield” and his first wife, Ann Hay Taliaferro, married Fontaine Maury and was the grandmother of the late General Dabney H. Maury. Elizabeth and three of her four siblings were named for people in the Taliaferro family. Included in an article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke of Morgantown, West Virginia, entitled “The Brooke Family of Virginia,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 12, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in July 1904. p. 107.


Dabney Herndon Maury’s Book ‘1796.’

Mentions a book entitled 1796 by D. H. [General Dabney Herndon] Maury. Taken from an article by Brigadier General Eben Swift, U.S. Army, Retired, “The Military Education of Robert E. Lee,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 35, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1927. p. 108.


“Dandridge Family – Martha Hale Dandridge Married William Winston Fontaine.”

Alexander Brown, Author. Rev. William Spotswood Fontaine wrote to Alexander Brown about 25 years earlier, stating that Martha Hale Dandridge had married William Winston Fontaine (d. 1816). They were Rev. William Spotswood Fontaine’s parents. The Rev. was married on July 5, 1832, with a cousin, Sarah Shelton Aylett (1811-1876). Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1896. pp. 139-140.


“Dandridge Family – Nathaniel West Dandridge Married Martha Fontaine, 1797.”

This article contains a history of the descendants of two brothers, Colonel William Dandridge of King William County, Virginia, and Colonel John D. Dandridge of New Kent County, Virginia. Colonel John Dandridge was the father of Martha Washington. Nathaniel West Dandridge (1762-1847), one of ten children of Captain Nathaniel West Dandridge (1729-1786) and Dorothea Spotswood (1733-1773), daughter of Governor Alexander Spotswood and Anne Butler Brayne, was married on July 13, 1797, with Martha Fontaine (1781-1845). Nathaniel’s sister, Dorothea Dandridge, married Patrick Henry. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 1, originally published in New York in 1907, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 118.


“The Dandridges of Virginia – William Dandridge Received Holy Sacraments from Rev. Francis Fontaine, 1728.”

Wilson Miles Carr, Author. On June 17, 1728, William Dandridge produced a certificate that he received holy sacraments on June 9, 1728, under the hands of Rev. Francis Fontaine, minister, clerk, and church wardens of the York-Hampton Parish. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 1, in Richmond by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1896. p. 32.


Daniel Claiborne married Mary Maury.

Daniel Claiborne, son of Thomas Claiborne Jr. and his wife, Anne Fox, married Mary Maury, daughter of Matthew Maury and his wife Mary Anne Fontaine. “Claiborne Genealogy” article by Mrs. Augusta Sherwin Tatum published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 2, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1894. pp. 217, 218.


“David W. Waggoner Land Sale to Benjamin B. Beall, Warren County, Georgia, 1811.”

David W. Waggoner appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to Benjamin B. Beall dated 26 January 1811. Adjoining landowners were Ignatius Few, John Kelly, and Archilaus Flewellin. The land was originally granted to John Dysart, other previous owners were James Threewitts and John Brooks. John Fontaine is listed as deceased but it is unclear if he had been a previous landowner or owned adjoining property or who this John Fontaine was. Benjamin B. Beall is most likely the father of Susanna Eliza Beall (1801-1885) who married Benjamin Bruton Fontaine, a son of Warren County settler Thomas Fontaine (1752-1808). Witnesses to the transaction were Samuel Tarrance and James Littleton. This abstract appears on page 241 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, pages 427-430.


The Days of the Upright: The Story of the Huguenots.

Owen J. A. Roche, Author. Includes a bibliography but no index. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, Inc. 1965. 340 pages.


Death Notice for Francis Fontaine in St. Amie, Canada, 1849

An abstracted death notice states that Francis Fontaine, age 102, died at St. Amie in Canada, in 1849. The abstract lists that Francis’ father received from General Montcalm for his services a silver cup with his arms and initials engrossed on it. Four of his sons, all old men, survive. There is no obvious connection between this Francis Fontaine and the Fontaine/Maury family; however, it is coincidental that this Francis Fontaine, based on his age at his death, was born around 1747, the same estimated birth year for Francis Fontaine III in North Carolina.

This death notice published in the August 22, 1849, issue of The National Intelligencer. Notice included in book by George A. Martin and Frank J. Metcalf, Marriage and Death Notices from The National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.) 1800-1850, published in Washington, D.C., by the National Genealogical Society, in 1976 in NGS Special Publication No. 41, p. 2,415.


Death of Colonel Richard Lancelot Maury, 1907.

Col. Richard L. Maury, of Richmond, Va., an annual member in the Virginia Historical Society, is included in the list of members who died during the year. He is mentioned as having served in the Confederate Army. Published in the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on December 31, 1907, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 15, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in 1908. pp. x, xi.


“Debera and Mary Chapman Land Sale to William Stith, Warren County, Georgia, 1804.”

Debera and Mary Chapman appear in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to William Stith dated 17 September 1804. Adjoining landowners were Ignatius Few and Solomon Locket. The land was originally granted to Richard Cureington or Cureton. Witnesses to the transaction were Hill Chapman and Thomas Fountain. This abstract appears on page 256 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 87-88.


Deed of Trust between Susanna Hubard and James W. Maury

This deed of trust is dated October 29, 1818, between Susanna Hubard and James W. Maury for her children from her first marriage, in Amherst County, Virginia.

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the Wilson Library, Southern Historical Collection #360, Hubard Family Papers Collection, Reel 4.


Depositions of Captains John Harris, Jno. Thomas, Thos. Williams, and George Batty, Mentions James Maury, Part Owner of the ‘Alert’, 1781.”

These depositions were sworn to and taken by W. Foushee, Justice of the Peace, on May 2, 1781, in Richmond, Virginia. They cite the engagement between British forces and Virginia armed vessels on April 27, 1781, on the James River. The engagement included Captain Edward Woneycott of the brig Alert, a flag of truce vessel chartered by the State and loaded with tobacco for the relief of Virginia officers and soldier prisoners of war held in Charleston, SC. Mr. James Maury, part owner of the Alert, deposed that on April 8, 1781, he chartered the vessel to David Ross, Esq., Commercial Agent of Virginia, for the purpose of proceeding to Charleston under a flag of truce. He indicated that on the same day he went to Four Mile Creek and required Captain Woneycott to “unship all the arms and military Stores and send them to Richmond.” On April 14 Woneycutt did this, leaving only one or two muskets on board “for the purpose of kindling fires.” Notwithstanding her flag of truce, the ship was captured and taken away by the British troops under Major General Phillips. The James Maury is presumably James Maury, Jr., son of the late Reverend James Maury. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1651-1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 1, in Richmond, VA, in 1853. p. 457.


“Descendants of Col. William Fontaine.”

Mrs. Thomas L. Broun, Author. Two articles by the same name that provide a genealogical outline of the family of Colonel William Fontaine of the Revolutionary Army, covers his nine children and some of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 6, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1898. pp. 208 and 305-306.


“Descendants of Edmund Ruffin, the Great Agriculturist and Author, Who Fired the First Gun at Fort Sumter in the War Between the States.”

This article by E. Lorraine Ruffin of Richmond includes a summary of U.S. presidents like George Washington and other notables who descend from French Huguenots. She includes Matthew Fontaine Maury in her summary. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 22, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1941, p. 269.


“Descendants of Rev. Rowland Jones, First Rector of Bruton Parish, Virginia; Mentions Francis Fontaine and His Family.”

Wilson Miles Cary, Author. Thomas Barber, who died on May 10, 1727, was married to Susannah Brush, daughter of John Brush, gun-maker to Governor Spotswood. Susannah married next with Rev. Francis Fontaine, professor of oriental languages at William and Mary in 1729, and for many years rector of York-Hampton Parish. Fontaine’s will was proven in York County on March 19, 1749. Susannah ruled Francis with a heavy hand. She took Francis Fontaine, her stepson, from college and bound him to a carpenter. John Fontaine, another stepson, she treated the same way. They moved to Newberne, North Carolina, where they made money by their trade. Mr. Fontaine had two children by Susannah, the Rev. James Maury Fontaine and Judith Barber Fontaine. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1897. p. 196.


A Detailed Account of the Suits Brought by the Clergy per the ‘Two Penny Act,” with Emphasis of the Reverend James Maury case, 1763.

A detailed account of the “Two Penny Act” and suits brought by the clergy. Rev. James Maury brought suit in Hanover County. Maury’s suit brought the greatest interest. The court decided that the Act was null and void, and a jury was summoned for the December term 1763 to assess damages, which awarded Maury only one penny beyond what he had been paid. “The Council and the Burgesses,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 19, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1910. pp. 21-23.


Devil Water.

Anya Seton, Author. Historical novel set in the middle of Queen Anne’s rule (1702-1714) that includes Rev. Peter Fontaine as a minor character. Good story that is historically accurate. Published in Boston by Houghton Mifflin in 1962. 526 pages.


Diagrams for Drawing the Whole Earth (also called “Map-Drawing, from Maury’s Revised ‘Manual of Geography’”).

C. E. Bush, Author. Diagrams for drawing the earth, based on the work by Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. in 1881. 8 pages of maps.


Diana Fontaine Maury 1858 Marriage with Spotswood Wellford Corbin, Details on Their Family.

Spotswood Wellford Corbin of King and George County, Virginia, married in 1858 with Diane Fontaine Maury, daughter of Commodore Matthew F. Maury. The article lists their three children, Ann Herndon Maury Corbin, Matthew Maury Corbin, and John Maury Corbin, and provides some details on the life of Matthew Maury Corbin. “The Corbin Family” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 31, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1923. p. 82.


Diana Minor and Richard Lancelot Maury, Parents of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

This article mentions that General John Minor’s sister, Diana, married Richard Lancelot Maury, and they were the parents of the famous Matthew Fontaine Maury. They are mentioned in the article, because during the Civil War, the Minor house on Main Street became the home of Admiral Maury. His daughter, Mrs Mary Maury Werth, helped the author if the article for a history of the house. Taken from an article by William Buckner McGroarty, “Elizabeth Washington of Hayfield,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 33, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1925. p. 158.


Diana Minor, Daughter of John Minor and Elizabeth Cosby, Married Richard Maury.

John Minor (1735-1800) married Elizabeth Cosby, and had a number of children, including daughter Diana Minor, born 1767, who married Richard Maury of Spotsylvania County. They were the parents of Matthew Fontaine Maury, the famous scientist, and grandparents of General Dabney Herndon Maury, Major-General of the Confederate Army. Continuation of an article, “The Minor Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1900. p. 53.


“Diary of John Blair.”

This article is derived from an almanac for 1751. Blair mentions in his diary entry of December 29, 1751, that Dr. Gilmer promised the governor the perusal of Dr. Walker’s journal of his travels beyond the mountain. In the notes of the article, it explains that Dr. Thomas Walker was Dr. George Gilmer’s brother-in-law, and was an ancestor of Matthew Fontaine Maury and many others. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1899. p. 17.


Diary of Two Days of Colonel William Winston Fontaine, Interviewing President Tyler, 1859.

William Winston Fontaine provides a compilation of five pages from his diary, covering two days, February 18-20, 1859, from Centreville, in King and Queen County, to Williamsburg. He mentions his father, Colonel William Spotswood Fontaine, and stories told to him on that trip by the former President Tyler, who recalled events dating back to the Revolution which he shared with Fontaine. “Diary of Col. William Winston Fontaine,” extracts of which contributed by the author, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 16, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1908. p. 157.


The Diligence and the Disappearance of Manakintown Huguenots

Allison Wehr Elterich, Author. She wrote this volume as a thesis for her Ph.D. in History in the American Studies Program of the College of William and Mary. It contains maps of French provinces, a list of settlers at Manakintown, a map of the 10,000 Acre Land Grant, and the actual plan of Manakintowne. The location of the lots of individuals is not shown on the maps or in the tables. Tables include statistics on countries to which the Huguenots fled during the period 1681-1720, and the percentage of passengers to settle in Manakin, neither table showing names of settlers. A table of ships with passengers bound for Manakin shows the name of the Captain, number of passengers, and dates of departure and arrival. The table of African slave births at Manakin, 1727-1729, shows the date, name of the child, and name of the master/owner. In addition to the historical text, there is a section giving a collection of family anecdotes and Huguenot lore, plus another section giving a detailed bibliography. Originally published in the August 1999 issue of The Cross of Languedoc. About 100 pages, indexed.


“Disbursements from Auditor’s Office, Includes Warrant for Abram Maury, 1792.”

List of warrants issued from this office between October 1, 1792, and December 31, 1792, includes an entry on October 20, 1792, for Abram Maury for £13.10.6. He appears again on November 17, 1792, for £14.0.0., and again on December 28, 1792, for £17.10.0. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. pp. 207, 212, and 221.


“Dobbs County, North Carolina, List of Taxables, 1769.”

Francis Fountain Jun.r and Francis Fountain & Son appear on pp. 9 and 10, respectively, in the alphabetical list of taxables in Dobbs County for 1769. These entries would be Francis “Frank” Fontaine and his son, Francis Fontaine III; the “& Son” in Frank’s house would be his son Petter. They appear in an article, “Dobbs County – List of Taxables, 1769, Surnames A-L,” in the Olde Dobbs Trail, Volume XXXI, Issue 2, published in the Spring 2011 in Goldsboro, North Carolina, by the Old Dobbs County Genealogical Society. The article notes that the tax list is in the Secretary of State Papers, S.S. 837, in the North Carolina State Archives. The list is not in exact alphabetical order.


Document by John Echols to Colonel Theo. Bland in Prince Georges County, Virginia; Signed by Abraham Maury, 1758.

This document, dated August 12, 1758, is an extract from a journal about a march that Captain Robert Wade took to the New River in search of enemy Indians. Abraham Maury signed the account on October 26, 1758, stating that John Echols had come before him that day and swore that the facts contained in the document were true. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1652 - 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume I, published in Richmond, VA, in 1875. pp. 254-257.


Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration to Virginia and to the Settlement at Manakin-Town: With an Appendix of Genealogies, Presenting Data of the Fontaine, Maury, Dupuy, Trabue, Marye, Chastain, Cocke, and Other Families.

R. A. Brock, Editor and Compiler. Includes extensive information on the Fontaines and Maurys, pp. 119-150. Originally published in 1886 in Richmond, VA, by the Virginia Historical Society. Republished in 1973 by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in Baltimore. 247 pages.


“Documents Relating to the Boundaries of the Northern Neck; Mentions Chaplain [Peter] Fontaine.”

Charles E. Kemper, Contributor. Includes a transcript of a letter written by Virginia Governor Gooch in 1729 to English authorities in London about the commission surveying the boundaries between North Carolina and Virginia. He mentions the services of the commission’s chaplain, Mr. [Peter] Fontaine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 28, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1920. p. 299.


Donation of Letters of Colonel Richard Lancelot Maury to the Virginia Historical Society.

In the “Gifts” section of the annual report, it is listed that the late Beverley B. Munford had donated the letters of Colonel R. L. [Richard Lancelot] Maury and those of several others with regard to the number of slaves owned by prominent Virginia Confederates. In the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on December 29, 1910, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in 1911. pp. viii.


Donation of One of Original French Narratives by Jean Fontaine, 1908.

In the “Gifts” report at the annual meeting, Professor William M. Fontaine of the University of Virginia is reported to have loaned to the Society one of the original narratives in French written by Rev. James Fontaine, who escaped from France at the time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Published in the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on January 1, 1909, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 17, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in 1909. pp. ix.


Donations to Virginia Historical Society of Consul James Maury Items, 1922.

In the “Gifts” section of the annual report, it lists that Miss Carlotta J. Maury of Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, had bequeathed by her upon her death to the Society a framed consular commission of her grandfather, James Maury, as 1st American Consul at Liverpool, signed by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, a solid silver platter presented to James Maury by the merchants of Liverpool at the conclusion of his 40 years as Consul, James Maury’s watch that carries the inscription “James Maury, Fredericksburg 1774,” and a plaster bust of James Maury with pedestal. In the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on October 26, 1922, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 31, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in 1922. pp. vi, vii.


The Douglas Register.

Reverend William Douglas, Author. Register of births and other genealogical records of Manakin, Goochland County, St. James Norham Parish, and King William County, Virginia. Richmond, VA: J. W. Fergusson & Sons. 1928.


Updated! The Douglas Register, Being a Detailed Record of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, Together with Other Interesting Notes, as Kept by the Rev. William Douglas from 1750 to 1797; an Index of Goochland Wills; Notes on the French-Huguenot Refugees who Lived in Manakin-town.

William MacFarlane Jones, Transcriber and Editor. The 2007 reprint of the 1928 edition includes the register from about 1750 to 1797, with other papers going back to 1705. It includes the registers for St. James Northam Parish (Dover Church) and King William Parish, which includes people who lived in the Virginia counties of Fluvanna, Goochland, Louisa, Orange, and Spotsylvania. Includes an index of Goochland County wills from 1728 to 1840. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Dr. Laurence Brooks, Brother-in-Law to Fontaine Maury, Great-Nephew General Dabney H. Maury.

Mentions that Dr. Laurence Brooks (ca. 1758 - ca. 1803) was appointed by Benjamin Franklin as the surgeon on the Bon Homme Richard. He practiced medicine in Fredericksburg for at least twenty years in later life and died around 1803 in the house built by his brother-in-law, Fontaine Maury, and in which his niece, the mother of the late General Dabney Herndon Maury, was born.

Continuation of the article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgantown, WV, “The Brooke Family,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1911. pp. 320, 322.


Dr. Thomas Walker, Ancestor to Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Reference to the journal of Dr. Thomas Walker, who was a patriot and explorer and a common ancestor to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Secretary of the Navy, Senator William C. Rives, the Honorable R. T. W. Duke, and Matthew F. [Fontaine] Maury, the scientist. Continuation article of “Diary of John Blair,” copied from an almanac for 1751, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1899. p. 17.


“Drafted in Captain Kennedy’s Company, 26 July 1777.”

An on-line transcription of the men in the four companies of Captain John Kennedy raised in Dobbs County on 26 July 1777; listed on-line in the Dobbs County Digital Library. Company No. 3 included John Fontaine. Other family members were in Company No. 1 – Benja. Rister [Risher) and Company No. 4 – Benjamin Bruton Jr.


Dublin Fragments, Social and Historic.

Ada Peter, Author. Includes a discussion of Huguenot society in Dublin. Published in Dublin, Ireland, by Hodges, Figgis, & Co. in 1927. 218 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


The Duke of Anjou and the Politique Struggle During the Wars of Religion.

Mack P. Holt, Author. A history of François Anjou, the Duke of Anjou (1554-1584) and the war of the Huguenots. Includes a bibliography and index. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 1986. 242 pages.


“Duplin County (NC) 1786 Tax Lists.”

The 1786 Duplin County list of taxables (free males aged 21 and over) for Captains Gillespie, Stallins, and Southerlands’ companies included four Fountains: Nathan Fountain, 400 acres, Duplin, taxed for one white male; Henry Fountain Sr., 200 acres, Duplin, 1 white male; Henry Fountain Jr., 300 acres, Duplin, 1 white male; and Joab Fountain, 350 acres, Duplin, 1 white male. Included in article by Jeffrey Haines in The North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 34, Number 4, November 228, p. 341. Mr. Haines transcribed the records from microfilm no. C.035.70001 at the North Carolina State Archives.


“The Eagle Has Landed Again.”

Peter Elson, Reporter. Article about returning the restored large American eagle to a newly constructed shopping complex where for two centuries, the first American consulate stood on Paradise Street. The eagle had been on the former consulate which was opened by the first U.S. consul, James Maury, in 1790. The article was on the unveiling of the newly restored eagle, a ceremony for the opening of the new shopping center attended by Princess Anne. Published in the Liverpool Daily Post on 3 October 2008.


“Early Fontaine Deeds in Richmond County, Georgia, 1780s.”

Several Fontaines appear in Richmond County, State of Georgia, Superior Court, General Index to Deeds & Mortgages, Book 1: 1787-1811, available on Family History Library microfilm roll 0276243. James Fontain appears in the index on p. 87, line 13, for power to attorney to Call and Siebert dated 22 July 1785, as recorded in Book 1 p. 71. Peter Fontaine is listed in the index on p. 90, line 3, as receiving a deed for £55 from Call Richards for 600 acres in Richmond County, as recorded in S.G. p. 31.


Early Modern France 1560-1715.

Robin Briggs, Author. A history of France in the 16th and 17th century, including the Huguenot movement. Includes a bibliography and index. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1998. 241 pages.


“The Early Westward Movement of Virginia 1722-1734; References the Journal of John Fontaine.”

Charles E. Kemper, Editor. The article references the journal of John Fontaine, which has the only written account of Governor Spotswood’s expedition across the Blue Ridge. Spotswood’s group was known as the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe. Fontaine’s account is also referenced as being reprinted in part in History of St. Mark’s Parish by [Rev. Philip] Slaughter. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 13, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1905. pp. 114, 118.


Edict of Nantes: Five Essays, and A New Translation.

Richard L. Goodbar, Editor. The National Huguenot Society. 1998.


Elementary Geography: Designed for Primary and Intermediate Classes.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. A geography textbook created from Maury’s books, First Lessons and The World We Live In. There were many editions of this book published between 1870 and 1945. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. 104 pages.


Elizabeth Brooke Married Fontaine Maury, 1785.

Cites that Richard Brooke and his first wife, Ann Hay Taliaferro, had a daughter Elizabeth Brooke who married on November 18, 1785, with Fontaine Maury, and died on August 20, 1800. It references Volume 18, p. 456. Summation of the multi-issue article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgantown, WV, “The Brooke Family,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 20, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1911. pp. 101.


Elizabeth Maury Lewis Herndon, ca 1756 - 1834.

James Lewis, widower of Sarah Herndon (1766-1784), married a second time with Elizabeth Maury. After Lewis’s death, Elizabeth Maury Lewis married Edward Herndon (1761-1837) of Spotsylvania County, Virginia. She died at “Laurel Hill” before November 15, 1834, at the age of 78, and had been for 50 years a member of the Episcopal Church. Included in an article by John W. Herndon entitled “A Genealogy of the Herndon Family” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 11, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in July 1903. p. 100.


Elizabeth Maury of Tennessee Married Franklin Lewis Owen (1803-1890).

Franklin Lewis Owen, a descendant of the poet Goronwy Owen (b. 1722), was born in 1803 and settled in Mobile, Alabama, where he held several Federal jobs and engaged in mercantile pursuits. He died in 1890. He had married Elizabeth Maury of Tennessee, and they had seven children, all named in the article. “Goronwy Owen,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1901. p. 158.


“Elizabeth Winston, daughter of William and Sarah Dabney Winston, Married Mr. Fontaine.”

In a query published about the Winston-Walker families, it states that Elizabeth Winston, daughter of William and Sarah Dabney Winston, married a Mr. Fontaine. Query on “Winston-Walker,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 35, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1927. p. 192.


“England’s ‘First Refugees.’”

Article by Dr. Robin D. Gwynn, originally published in History Today in 1985, Volume 35, No. 5. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


An Englishwoman in America.

Sarah Mytton Hughes Maury, Author. Wife of William Maury and daughter-in-law to James Maury, U.S. Consul General in Liverpool, provided many insights into the lives of Maurys, mostly the family of her father-in-law, as well as into the issues and American leaders of the period. Published in London by T. Richardson & Son in 1848. 204 pages.


Engraving of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

George Edward Perine, Engraver. A head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left. Engraved for the Eclectic by George Perine in New York between 1850 and 1870. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


L'Épopée Huguenote.

Raoul Stephan. A history of the Huguenots. Includes a bibliography. Paris: La Colombe. 1945. 294 pages.


1799 Estate Settlement of Francis Fontaine in Warren County, Georgia.

John Goza, Nathan Bruton, and Joshua Goza are identified as heirs-by-marriage of Francis Fontaine in the settlement of his estate and certified that they each received $75.10 from Benjamin and Jamima [Jemima] Fontaine. The document was witnessed by Sarah Fontaine and Edward Matthews. Edward Matthews appeared before William Cason, Justice of the Peace, on 4 October 1799 to swear that he and Sarah Fontaine had witnessed the transaction. It was recorded on 1 November 1799. An entry in the book states the record was transferred to Book A, page 532 on 3 August 1853. Appears on pp. 357-358 in Warren County, State of Georgia, Superior Court, Deeds & Mortgages 1797-1799 Book D, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0295852, reviewed on 29 September 2012 by Brian H. Nilsson. Francis Fontaine III’s estate was administered by his widow, Jemima Fontaine Bruton, and her second husband, Benjamin Bruton.


Etowah, A Romance of the Confederacy.

Francis Fontaine (1844-1901), Author. A novel that revolves around a Confederate veteran. The author is a member of the extended Fontaine family. Self-published in Atlanta in 1887. 524 pages.


“Excerpts from the Diary of Major Giles B. Cooke (1864).”

Major Cooke was on the staff of General Beauregard at the time of this writing. In his diary, he documents on August 8, 1864, that he rode with Lieutenant Fontaine to Colonel Moseley’s camp. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 19, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1937. p. 8.


Explanations and Sailing Directions to Accompany the Wind and Current Charts.

Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Approved by Commodore Lewis Warrington, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography; and published by the authority of the Honorable William A. Graham, Secretary of the Navy. Maury’s sailing directions. Published in Washington, D.C., by C. Alexander, printer, in November 1851. It was published in many editions and languages. The 1851 issue was the 3rd edition. 315 pages.


An Extract from a Treatise by Lieutenant [Matthew Fontaine] Maury of the U.S. Navy, 1844.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Derived from a treatise printed in U.S. House of Representative document no. 33 from the 1st Session of the 28th Congress. Published in 1844. 11 pages, including a map.


Fact and Fiction in Virginia History, Includes Citing John Fontaine’s Journal.

John Walter Wayland, Author. Wayland clarifies an oft-repeated error regarding Governor Alexander Spotswood 1716 expedition across the Blue Ridge which states that the expedition took six weeks. He cites John Fontaine’s journal, which makes it clear that it was only about four weeks. They left Williamsburg on August 20 and returned there on September 17, 1716. This 20 page booklet was first published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 10, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1928, p. 101. It was then published in 1929. The booklet is available at the Library of Virginia in Richmond and in the University of Virginia Special Collections in Charlottesville, Virginia.


The Faith and Fortunes of France’s Huguenots, 1600-1685.

Philip Benedict, Author. Includes a bibliography and index. Burlington, VT: Ashgate. 2000. 336 pages.


Une Famille Française.

Lucien Maury, Author. Published in 1942 in Paris, France, by Stock, Delamain et Boutelleau. 215 pages.


“The Family of Obadiah Smith – His Daughter, Susanna Smith, Married Isaac Winston, Grandson of the Reverend Peter Fontaine.”

This article, part of a larger series on the Cocke family, provides a genealogical outline of the Smith family. Obadiah’s daughter, Susanna Smith, married Isaac Winston, son of Isaac and Mary Ann Fontaine Winston and grandson of Rev. Peter Fontaine. Isaac’s brother, Peter Winston, was member of the Henrico Committee of Safety in 1774, and was grandfather of John Winston Jones (1791-1848), Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives during the 28th Congress. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 5, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1897. p. 80.


Family Details on Mary Grymes (1753-1789), Wife of the Reverend Walker Maury.

In the will of Mrs. Mary Dawson Grymes, widow of Ludwell Grymes (1733-before 1795), she mentions Hannah Grymes, her son John Grymes; legacies to Mary Maury, daughter of Rev. Walker Maury, and Mary Maury, daughter of William Maury. The will was dated May 15, 1787, and proved in Orange County, Virginia, on June 23, 1787. The article further explains that Ludwell and Mary Grymes’ daughter, Mary, born in Williamsburg on August 26, 1753, had married Rev. Walker Maury on May 7, 1777, and died Sept. 23, 1789. A continuation article, author unnamed, “Grymes of Brandon etc.” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 28, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1920. p. 189.


Family Entries in Walker Maury’s Bible.

In the “Historical and Genealogical Notes” section, it lists extracts provided by Dr. Joseph Leidy from Walker Maury’s Bible. Included are Mary Grymes (1758-1839), Walker Maury (1752-1788), their marriage in 1777; and the names of their children, Mary Stith Maury, James Walker Maury, Leonard Hill Maury, Ann Tunstall Maury, William Grymes Maury, Penelope Johnstone Maury, Matthew Fontaine Maury, and Catherine Ann Maury. It also lists William Grymes Maury’s first daughter, Mary Dawson Maury, and first son, Ludwell Grymes Maury. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1897. p. 65.


Updated! Family Names of Huguenot Refugees to America.

Mrs. James M. Lawton, Author. First issued in the Constitution of the Huguenot Society of America, as revised on January 7, 1901. Republished in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1991. 20 pages. The family names are listed alphabetically with information on the place where the family was first seen and the place of settlement in America. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Family Notes by Major Isaac Hite; Son Isaac Hite Junior Married Anne Tunstall Maury, 1803.

Isaac Hite, Junr., son of Isaac Hite, married a second time with Anne Tunstall Maury, on December 1, 1803. She was born September 14, 1782, and died January 6, 1851. Others mentioned include Isaac Fontaine Hite, born May 7, 1807, at half after 6 am; Walker Maury Hite, born May 12, 1811, half after 9 am; Ann Maury Hite married Philip Williams, Jr, Feb. 9, 1826.

“Memo. Copied from the Notebook of Major Isaac Hite, Jr. (born February 7, 1758; died November 24, 1836), of ‘Belle Grove,’ Frederick County, Va.,” contributed by Miss S. Jaquelin Davison, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1901. p. 121.


Family Record of the Reverend Walker Maury Family.

Includes the birth, marriage, and death dates for Rev. Walker Maury and his wife Mary Grymes, the births of their children, death dates for some, and several marriage records. “The Family Record of Rev. Walker Maury, Son of Rev. James Maury and Mary his Wife, Who Married Molly Grymes,” contributed by Miss S. Jaquelin Davison, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1901. pp. 123-124.


The Family Skeleton: A History and Genealogy of the Flewellen, Fontaine, Copeland, Treutlen, McCormick, Allan, and Stuart Families.

Henrietta McCormick Hill, Author. Includes the family coat-of-arms. Published in Montgomery, AL, by Paragon Press, Inc., in 1958. 186 pages.

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“Fontaine - Armistead Query.”

Query about the Mary Fontaine-William Bowles Armistead family. Mary was a granddaughter of Rev. Peter Fontaine. Cites their two sons, Bowles Jr. and Peter Fontaine Armistead, who lived in Tuscumbia, AL. Peter’s son, Fontaine Armistead, married a distant relative, a daughter of George Graham Armistead and his first wife, Alice Virginia Fontaine of Loudon County, VA. The writer cites Alice’s mother as Alice Berkeley Fontaine but does not know the name of her father. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1896. p. 342.


“Fontaine and Connected Families.”

J. S. Carpenter, Paymaster, U.S. Navy, Author. Provides the graduation dates from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, of the sons of James Fontaine. Also provides a brief history of the family of Anne Elizabeth Boursiquot. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 22, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in April 1914. pp. 195-197.


Updated! “Fontaine Entries in ‘The Rural Cabinet’ newspaper, Warrenton, Georgia, 1828-1830.”

John Fontaine appears in this weekly newspaper that was published every Saturday in Warrenton, Georgia, with editions from 31 May 1828 to 26 June 1830 available on microfilm at the Georgia Archives. He appeared in the 20 September 1828 issue as John Fontaine attending an anti-tariff meeting and in the 30 May 1829 issue as John Fountaine together with John Moore, William Castleberry, Robert Fleming, Joseph Wright, Henry Lockhart, and John G. Winter, the building committee of the Warrenton Baptist Meeting House. John Fontaine was likely John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). These two entries both appear on p. 155 of Daniel Nathan Crumpton’s book, Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates.


Fontaine Maury, Names His Wife, Children, and His Grandson, General Dabney Maury.

Mentions that Fontaine Maury was the youngest son of Fontaine Maury [incorrect, he was a son of the Reverend James Maury and grandson of Matthew Maury, who left France], the Huguenot who came to this country after the repeal of the Edict of Nantes. Elizabeth “Betty” Brooke and her husband Fontaine Maury were the grandparents of the late General Dabney Herndon Maury. The article includes a paragraph on their marriage in 1785 and names their two children who married, Eliza Maury (1793-1824) who married her first cousin Capt. John Minor Maury, and Richard Brooke Maury who married Ellen Magruder. It also lists their grandchildren. Continuation of the article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgantown, WV, “The Brooke Family,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 18, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1910. pp. 455, 456.


Fort Christanna: Address Delivered on the Occasion of the Erection of a Monument by the Society of Colonial Dames of America, in the State of Virginia, to Mark Its Site.

Address by Edward Price Buford given on May 22, 1924, and then published in Lawrenceville, Virginia, by the Brunswick Times-Gazette Press. The address was a history of the fort. Buford mentioned the 1716 visit by Governor Spotswood, a visit that was vividly recounted by John Fontaine, who accompanied the Governor. A review of the address was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 6, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1925, p. 219. The address is available in the Library of Virginia in Richmond.


“Fountain Hill.”

Listed in a section entitled “Other Communities” in 200 Years of Progress: A Report of the History and Achievements of the People of Lenoir County, published by Kinston - Lenoir County Bicentennial Commission and the Lenoir County Board of Commissioners, in 1976. It states on page 22 that “Fountain Hill, in the northernmost part of Lenoir County, on Contentnea Creek was named for the Francis Fountain [sic] family who settled nearby in 1769.” This was Francis “Frank” Fontaine II (1721-1785).


La France protestante; ou, Vies des protestants franççais qui se sont fait un nom dans l'histoire depuis les premiers temps de la réformation jusqu' B la reconnaissance du principe de la liberté des cultes par l'Assemblée nationale; ouvrage précéde d'une notice historique sur le protestantisme en France, suivi de pieces justificatives, et rédigé sur des documents en grand partie inédits.

Eugene and Émile Haag, Authors. Includes history of the Boursiquot family in Volume 3. Part of 10 volume set originally published between 1846 and 1859. The 2nd edition was published in Paris and Geneva by J. Cherbuliez in 1881. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Francis Fountaine/Fontaine on List of 2nd South Carolina Regiment, 1777.

Documents the activity of the 2nd South Carolina Regiment is known for the period of January 15 to November 15, 1777, based in part from the Orderly Book of Captain Samuel DuBose of the 2nd Regiment. Francis “Fountaine/Fontaine” is listed on page 30 of the article. The South Carolina Government’s service eligibility requirements tell us something about Francis Fontaine III. The State required that “all recruits [must be] physically fit, having no sore legs, not less than 5 ft. 3 in. height, nor over forty-five years old.” Based on these requirements, Francis is known to have been at least 5 feet 3 inches tall and was born after 1732. Article by John Bennett, “A List of Noncommissioned Officers and Private Men of the Second Continental Regiment of Foot, ” and published in The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume XVI, Number 1, January 1915, published in Charleston by the South Carolina Historical Society, pp. 25-33.


“Francis Fontaine Estate in 1794 Montgomery County, Georgia, Record.”

Francis Fontaine appears in a list of 99 names of Montgomery County, Georgia “records, marks and brands and estray book” as entry number 5, dated 8 July 1794. Other family members also in this list are Benjamin Bruton (entry number 4, just above Francis, on the same date), Francis Spann (entry 65 dated 19 October 1795; this Francis was the son-in-law of John Bruton), and John Bruton (entry 78, dated 4 June 1796). The Francis Fontaine entry would have been for the estate of Francis Fontaine III. The Benjamin Bruton and Francis Spann entries appear on p. 201 and the Francis Spann and John Bruton entries on p. 202 of the book by James E. Dorsey and John K. Derden, A Source Book of Genealogy and History: Montgomery County, Georgia, published in 1983 in Swainsboro, Georgia, by Magnolia Press.


Francis Fontaine The Builder 1721-1785, His Ancestors and Descendants and Their Connections.

Hubert Horton McAlexander, Richard Douglas McCrum, and Dan Morse Woodliff, Authors. A definitive history of Francis Fontaine and his descendants, correcting mistakes in this line of the Fontaine family that originated with Ann Maury’s misreading of a letter from the Fontaine family of Columbus, Georgia and added incorrectly to her 1853 Fontaine/Maury chart. Published by Otter Bay Books in Baltimore, Maryland, in 2009. Sources woven into the text, fully indexed. 278 pages.


“Francis Fontaine III, ca. 1747 - before December 1782.”

Brian H. Nilsson, Author. Provides a biography of Francis Fontaine III of North and South Carolina. Published in the Huxford Genealogical Society, Inc., Magazine, Volume XXXII, Number 1, March 2005, pages 46-48.


“Francis Taliaferro Brooke’s Sister Married Fontaine Maury; Mentioned Gen. Dabney Maury.”

Mentions Francis Taliaferro Brooke, who at the age of 85 in 1849 wrote his memoirs. Brooke had been judge of the Court of Appeals of Virginia. His only sister was married to Fontaine Maury. Brooke’s family residence was called “St. Julien.” General Dabney [Herndon] Maury, Judge Brooke’s nephew, wrote a description of the house as he remembered it from his youth. Maury’s text is quoted in the article. An article, “The Mouth of Massaponax,” by William Buckner McGroarty, published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 13, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1932. pp. 182, 184.


“Francis F. Risher Land Sale to James Isdail, Warren County, Georgia, 1814.”

Francis F. Risher appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to James Isdail dated 7 December 1814. Francis Risher was likely the son of Mary Fontaine and Benjamin Risher and a grandson of Francis Fontaine, Jr. A prior landowner was Peter Perkins. Witnesses to the transaction were J. Fountain and Henry Gore. This abstract appears on page 261 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, page 187.


Fredericksburg and the Cavalier Country.

John T. Goolrick, Author. Mentions notable women of Fredericksburg, including Mrs. Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Richmond by Garrett & Massie Publishers in 1935. 92 pages. A review of this book was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 23, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1942. p. 210.


The French Blood in America.

This 2007 reprint of a 1906 book has chapters on Huguenot settlements in Canada, Oxford, Narragansett, New Amsterdam, New Rochelle, and New Paltz, and in Delaware, Maine, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. The appendices include a list of “Some English Surnames of French Origin” and a list of the “Present Members of the Huguenot Society of America” as of 1906. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The French Civil Wars.

R. J. Knecht, Author. A history of the wars of the Huguenots, 1562-1598. Includes bibliography and index. New York: Pearson Education. 2000.


French Government and Society in the Religious Wars.

John Hearsey McMillan Salmon, Author. St. Louis, MOL: Forum Press. 1977.


“The French Huguenot Frontier Settlement of Manakin Town.”

James L. Bugg, Jr., Author. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 61, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1953.


French Huguenots: How Some Made Their Way to Beaufort.”

Mary Warshaw, Author. Article on webpage Beaufort, North Carolina History: Histories and Images from the Past. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


French Huguenots: From Mediterranean Catholics to White Anglo-Saxon Protestants.

Abraham D. Lavender, Author. Includes bibliography and index. Huguenot history and genealogy. American University Studies, Series IX, History, 0740-0462, Volume 80. New York: Peter Lang, Inc. 1990. 264 pages.


French Huguenots in English Speaking Lands.

Horton and Marie-Hélene Davies, Authors. Includes bibliography and index. New York: Peter Lang, Inc. 2000. 147 pages.


“French Protestant Refugees Relieved through the Threadneedle Street Church, London, 1681-1687.”

Article by A. P. Hands and Irene Scouloudi in Huguenot Society of London Quarto Series, Volume XLIX, published in 1971 in London by the Huguenot Society of London, 74, in Threadneedle Street and French Protestant Refugees, c. 1660-1700 (on CD), Huguenot Society Quarto Series, Volumes XXI, XLIX, and LVIII, published in 2004 in London by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The French Religious Wars in English Political Thought.

John Hearsey McMillan Salmon, Author. History and politics in Great Britain and the war of the Huguenots, 1562-1598. Includes a bibliography and index. First edition published in 1959 by the Clarendon Press in Oxford. Reprinted in Westport, CT, by Greenwood Press in 1981. 202 pages.


The French Wars of Religion, 1559-1598.

R. J. Knecht, Author. A history of religion in France in the 16th century, with a focus on the Huguenot Wars of 1562 to 1598 and the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in France in 1572. Includes bibliography and index. An earlier edition was published in 1989. New York: Longman. 1996. 151 pages.


The French Wars of Religion, 1562-1629.

Mack P. Holt, Author. A history of the Huguenots, the social aspects and the wars. Includes bibliography and index. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 1995. 239 pages.


From New Babylon to Eden: The Huguenots and Their Migration to Colonial South Carolina.

Bertrand Van Ruymbeke, Author. Published in Columbia, South Carolina, by the University of South Carolina Press in 2006. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


From Strangers to Citizens : The Integration of Immigrant Communities in Britain, Ireland, and Colonial America, 1550-1750.

Randolph Vigne and Charles Littleton, Editors. Proceedings of a conference convened in London on April 5-7, 2000, by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. The book includes nearly 60 essays on practically every aspect of Huguenot history. Includes bibliographical references and index. Published in London by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and in Portland, Oregon, by Sussex Academic Press. 2001. 567 pages. The table of contents for the book is available on-line catalogue on the Library of Congress webpage.


The Furniture of Coastal North Carolina 1720-1820.

John Bivins, Jr., Author. On page 381 in the “Pamlico and Cape Fear” chapter, it cites that Francis and John Fontaine were joiners who had moved to New Bern in the early 1750s from Williamsburg and that they worked there until the early 1770s. In the “Coastal North Carolina Cabinetmakers” section are listed brief biographies of Francis Fontaine (Fountain) and John Fontaine (Fountain). There are errors in these brief biographies, most notably referring to the Reverend Peter Fontaine as John’s nephew when Peter was his uncle. There is also reference to John Fountain in the brief biography of Benjamin Somes, a cabinetmaker in Craven County. Published by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts as part of the Frank L. Horton Series, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and distributed by the University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, in 1988. 562 pages, includes maps, an index, and a bibliography.


Gardette Family Bible.

Blaise Emile (or Emile Blaise) Gardette, born 12 August 1803 in Pennsylvania, married twice, his second wife he married on 5 May 1853 with Catherine, daughter of George Pepper and widow of Charles Rockland Thomson. Blaise and Catherine had one child, Julia Desmarais Gardette, born 2 August 1854, near Germantown, PA, married 2 February 1875 with James Robb Maury. Their children were (1) Katherine “Cath.” Maury, born 11 February 1876 in PA, (2) Mathew Fontaine Maury, born 14 August 1881, (3) Austin Gardette Maury, born 30 March 1885, and (4) James Robb Maury, born 19 March 1887.

These details taken from the transcription of the Bible of Jacques “James” Gardette, in the National Genealogical Society’s Family Papers Collection / Bible Records.


Gaspard de Coligny, Admiral of France.

Arthur Whiston Whitehead, Author. History of Gaspard de Coligny, Seigneur de Châtillon (1519-1572) and the war of the Huguenots. Includes maps. London: Methuen & Co. 1904. 387 pages.


Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, Virginia, Embracing a Revised and Enlarged Edition of Dr. Philip Slaughter’s ‘History of St. Mark’s Parish.’”

Contains extensive records on the Fontaine and Maury families. Published in Baltimore, MD, by the Regional Publishing Co. in 1971.


Genealogies of Virginia Families from ‘The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.’”

Outline descendant tree by Mrs. Thomas L. Broun of the descendants of Col. William Fontaine, pp. 88-91. Includes brief articles by J. S. Carpenter on the Fontaine and Boursiquot families, pp. 91-93. Published in Baltimore, MD, by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1981. 1,205 pages, indexed.


“Genealogy: The Gorsuch and Lovelace Families: Anna Gorsuch and the Todd Family of Virginia and Maryland.”

Mentions Colonel William Spotswood Fontaine’s June 7, 1833, notes from interviewing Colonel John Spotswood Stryken. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 25, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in January 1917. p. 89.


General Dabney Maury Mentioned in William Fitzhugh Gordon Biography.

The review of Armistead C. Gordon’s biography of his grandfather, William Fitzhugh Gordon, a Virginian of the Old School, His Life, Times, and Correspondence (New York and Washington: Neale Publishing Co. 1909) includes mention of the autobiography of Southern General [Dabney H.] Maury, which illustrates the geniality, sympathy, kindliness, simplicity, warmth, and mellowness of the old social order. Review by Philip Alexander Bruce published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 18, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1910. p. 236.


Geography of New York.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. in 1885. 8 pages.


“George Fontaine Letter Remaining at Columbus, Georgia, Post Office, 1840.”

George Fontaine is listed in an article entitled “A List of Letters” as having a letter remaining at the Columbus, Georgia, post office on January 1, 1840. This appears in an abstract of the Saturday, January 4, 1840, issue of the Columbus Sentinel and Herald on pages 757-759 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5: 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“George Hargraves Land Sale to Richard Gunn, Warren County, Georgia, 1816.”

George Hargraves appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to Richard Gunn dated 2 April 1816. Hamilton Goss was a previous landowner and William Goyne an adjacent landowner. John Battle is listed as deceased but it is unclear why he is listed in the abstract. The witnesses were John Fountain and Hardy Pitts. This abstract appears on page 263 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 238 and 239.


“George Washington, 1st President: Full Brothers and Sisters of President Washington.”

A genealogy of Washington’s siblings. Descendant Julia Wood Washington (born in 1850 in Columbus, Colorado County, Texas) was married in 1873 with Sydney Thruston Fontaine (1838-1912) of Houston, son of Judge Henry Whiting Fontaine and Susan Elizabeth Bryan. Published in Burke’s Presidential Families of the United States of America, 2nd Edition, in London by Peerage Ltd., 1981. p. 31.


“George Winston’s Son, Edmund, Married E. Fontaine.”

Mrs. E. C. Hendrick, Author. Brief genealogical outline of the Judge Edmund Winston (ca. 1745-1818) family. His second wife was the widow of Patrick Henry. His son George Winston married Dorothea Henry, Patrick Henry’s daughter. George’s son, another Edmund Winston, married E. Fontaine. An article “”Winston (Edmund),” by Mrs. E. C. Henrick, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 5, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1897. p. 207.


Gift of Engraved and Lithographic Portrait of Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1906.

In the “Gifts and Loans” portion of the annual report, it lists that Mr. R. B. Munford, Jr., had made a gift or loan of an engraved and lithographic portrait of Commodore [Matthew Fontaine] Maury. Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on December 18, 1906, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 14, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in 1907. p. vi.


Gone With the Wind.

Margaret Mitchell, Author. This famous novel, set in Georgia before and during the Civil War, includes a Fontaine family among its characters. The local doctor was a Fontaine. Published in 1936 in New York by the Macmillan Company. 733 pages. The novel was criticized in a book review, stating that it provides a misleading depiction of life in the South. The review cites a quote by a character, “Grandma Fontaine,” to make the point that Southern pioneers were not necessarily gross and vulgar. The review goes on to say that before the war the Fontaine family of North Georgia that is depicted in the book does not worry about more than what to wear for dinner. This review was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 19, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1937. pp. 123, 124.


“The Great of the Earth?”

An article about three great military and naval figures, including an assessment of Matthew Fontaine Maury. Quotes from Maury’s own writings and those of John V. Herndon about Maury. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 23, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1942. pp. 147-148.


“Griffin Family Records: Copied from Mrs. Nancy Chiswell Lewis’s Bible.”

Lists the marriage of James Lewis and Sarah Thruston on December 18, 1784, by Reverend Mr. Fontain. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 23, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in October 1915. p. 433.


“Gunsmiths in Williamsburg – Mentions John Brush’s Daughter Susanna, Her Husband Francis Fontaine.”

The gunsmith John Brush was brought to Virginia by Governor [Alexander] Spotswood. Brush’s daughter, Susanna, married twice, first with Thomas Barber and then with Reverend Francis Fontaine, Professor of Oriental Languages at William & Mary College. Article “Gunsmiths in Williamsburg,” published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 3, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1922. p. 299.


“Happy Birthday, Matthew Maury.”

A brief biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury in honor of the 200th anniversary of his birth. Article by Howard Cohen published in The Pathfinder: The Geospatial Intelligence Magazine, Volume 4, Number 5, published in Bethesda, MD, by the U.S. Department of Defense’s National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in September/October 2006, pp. 15-18. The article was also published in the June 25, 2006, issue of The Washington Post.


“Henry Genealogy – Patrick Henry’s Daughter Martha Married John Fontaine.”

A history of the descendants of John Henry of Virginia, son of Alexander and Jean (Robertson) Henry of Aberdeen, Scotland. Martha Henry, one of six children of Patrick Henry (1736-1799) and his first wife, Sarah Shelton (daughter of John Shelton), married John Fontaine, son of the Reverend Peter Fontaine. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 6, originally published in Baltimore in 1917, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 244.


Henry IV.

David Buisseret, Author. A biography of the Henry IV, King of France from 1589 until 1610, who provided for partial toleration of Protestantism when he issued the Edict of Nantes in 1598. Includes a bibliography and index. Boston: George Allen & Unwin, Inc. 1984. 235 pages.


Henry Tucker, Mary Maury Marriage Bond, Amelia County, Virginia, January 1793.

Marriage bond in January 1793, Henry Tucker and Mary Maury. Continuation article, “Amelia County Marriage Bonds,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 17, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1908. p. 40.


The Heritage of Virginia: The Story of Place Names in the Old Dominion.

James Hagemann, Author. Includes brief history of the home ‘Bear Castle’ in Louisa County, mentions Rev. James Maury, pp. 13-14. Brief biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury in article on the Maury River in Rockbridge Country, p. 155. Brief history of the Maury School in Albemarle County and Rev. James Maury, p. 155. Published in 1986 in Norfolk/Virginia Beach, VA, by the Donning Co. 297 pages, indexed.


A Hilltop in Foggy Bottom: Home of the Old Naval Observatory and the Navy Medical Department.

Jan K. Herman, Historian and Author, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery; Department of the Navy. History of the Old Naval Observatory and the role of Matthew Fontaine Maury, 4th printing, published in Washington, D.C., by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Department of the Navy, in 1996. 84 pages. Copy donated to the Society by George Carter Werth.


Une Histoire de Castelmoron.

Claude Gache, Author. A history of Castelmoron, where the Maury family has its origins. Published by Syndicat d’Initiatives in Castelmoron sur Lot, France.


Histoire des Martyrs.

Jean Cresping, Author. Includes a summary of the murder of Jean de la Fontaine. Dixi Pme Livre de l’Histoire des Martyrs et des Eglises du Seigneur en Divers Lieux: Specialement au Royaume de France. Published by Pierre Aubert, Geneva, 1619. A copy of the original 1619 edition is available in the Library of Congress collection.


Histories of the Dividing Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina.

William Byrd, Author. Contains the author’s The History of the Dividing Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina and The Secret History of the Line, which is another version of the same subject matter, both published in this single book. Rev. Peter Fontaine was the chaplain for the commission for surveying the border between North Carolina and Virginia. This is an unabridged reprint of the work first published by the North Carolina Historical Commission in 1929. Published in New York by Dover Publications in 1967. 340 pages, full bibliography.


A History of Colonial Bath.

Herbert R. Paschal, Jr., Author. Published in 1955 in Raleigh, North Carolina, by the Committee on the 250th anniversary of the founding of Bath, Edwards & Broughton, Printers. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


History of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Judge Alvin T. Embrey, Author. This book includes the story of Matthew Fontaine Maury’s life. Published in Richmond by Old Dominion Press in 1937. 202 pages. A review of the book, which states that the book was “well-done,” was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 19, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1937. p. 120.


History of the French Protestant Refugees from the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes to Our Own Days.

M. Charles Weiss, Author. Translated by Henry William Herbert. 2 volumes. New York: Stringer & Townsend. 1854.


A History of the Huguenot Society of North Carolina.

Roger Kammerer, Author. Published by the Huguenot Society of North Carolina in 2013. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“History of Gloucester County, Virginia, and Its Families.”

Sally Nelson Robins, Author. Mentions several ministers in the county, including Rev. Francis Fontaine. This fact is included in a book review published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 1, No. 1, published in July 1893, p. 480. Published in Richmond, VA, by West, Johnston & Co., in 1893.


History of the de Graffenried Family from 1191 A.D. to 1956.

Thomas P. de Graffenried, Author. This family history includes information on the Fontaine and Maury families. A book review of an earlier edition of this book mentions these facts in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 34, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1926, p. 197. The earlier edition was self-published by the author in New York City in 1925. A later edition was published in Charlottesville, VA, by the University of Virginia Press in 1958. 273 pages, indexed.


Updated! History of the Huguenot Emigration to America.

Charles W. Baird, D.D. Originally published in two volumes in 1885 and chronicle the emigration of Huguenots via the Netherlands and Great Britain in the latter half of the 17th century. It provides details on early families that settled in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Virginia. It was reprinted as a single volume in Baltimore by the Regional Publishing Co. in 1966. It was reissued by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in Baltimore in 1985 and in 1991. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families.

Ralph LeFevre, Author. This 2005 reprint of the 1909 edition is considered the definitive history of New Paltz, one of the oldest Huguenot settlements in America, including surrounding areas in Ulster and Orange Counties, New York. Part 1 contains genealogical records from New Paltz and part 2 the histories of prominent Huguenot and Dutch families in New Paltz. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


A History of Orange County, Virginia.

W. W. Scott, Author. Mentions John Fontaine’s journal and documentation of Governor Spotswood’s expedition into the Blue Ridge. A review of this book also mentions Fontaine’s journal and appears in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 15, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1908, p. 337. Published in Richmond, VA, by Everett Waddey Co. in 1907. 292 pages, indexed.


History of St. Mark’s Parish, Culpeper County, Virginia, With Notes of Old Churches and Old Families, and Illustrations of the Manners and Customs of the Olden Time.

Rev. Philip Slaughter, Author. Provides an account of Governor Spotswood’s expedition, as described in John Fontaine’s journal. Published in Baltimore, MD, by Innes & Co, Printers, in 1877. 200 pages.


“Hite Family – Isaac Hite Married Anne Turnstall Maury, Daughter of Rev. Walker Maury, 1803..”

A history of the descendants of Hans Jost Hite (Heydt) of Alsace, who landed in New York in 1710. Major Isaac Hite (1758-1836), one of seven children of Colonel Isaac Hite (1723-1795) and Eleanor Eltinge, was married on December 1, 1803, with Anne Tunstall Maury (1782-1851). She was the daughter of the Reverend Walker Maury of the Protestant Episcopal Church and Mary Grymes. Anne Maury was Isaac Hite’s second wife. His first wife was Eleanor Conway Madison, sister of President James Madison, Jr. The article includes information on Isaac and Anne’s ten children: Ann Maury Hite; Isaac Fontaine Hite; Mary Eltinge Hite; Rebecca Grymes Hite; Walker Maury Hite; Sarah Clark Hite; Penelope Elizabeth Hite; Hugh Holmes Hite; Cornelius Baldwin Hite; and Matilda Madison Hite. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 4, originally published in Baltimore in 1914, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 202.


“How Should Our President Be Nominated?”

A critical assessment of the party nominating system. The article concludes with a quote from Matthew Fontaine Maury, which reads: “True progress consists in the discovery of error as well as of truth. . . .” Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 22, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1940. p. 68.


Huguenot Ancestry.

Noel Currer-Briggs and Royston Gambier, Authors. Huguenot genealogy in Great Britain. Includes bibliography and index. Chichester and Sussex: Phillimore, 1985. 150 pages.


Huguenot and Scots Links, 1575-1775.

David Dobson, author. This 2008 reprint of a 2005 edition includes information on over 1,000 Scottish Huguenots and their descendants. Some went to Scotland after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and a larger number in the last quarter of the 17th century. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenot Church of New York: A History of the French Church of Saint Esprit.

John A. F. Maynard, Author. One of the oldest churches in America. In 2002 the Church initiated plans to add the Maury family crest to its walls, per a request of a Maury family descendant and member of the church. Published in New York by French Church of Saint Esprit in 1938. 317 pages.


“The Huguenot Emigrants in America.”

Article in Littell’s Living Age, Volume 2, No. 29, published 21 September 1844; 446, in “American Periodicals Serials (APS) Online” [database] at www.proquest.com. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenot Emigration to Virginia and to the Settlement at Manakin-Town, with an Appendix of Genealogies Presenting Data of the Fontaine, Maury, Dupuy, Trabue, Marye, Chastain, Cocke, and Other Families.

Robert Alonzo Brock, originally published in 1886 and reprinted in 2007. It includes records of baptisms at Manakin-Town from 1721 to 1754, including the names of godparents. The index has approximately 4,000 names. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


A Huguenot Exile in Virginia: Voyages of a Frenchman Exiled for his Religion, with a Description of Virginia and Maryland in America.

Durand de Dauphiné, Author. First-hand account of life in France, escape, travels in Europe and colonial America. Published by Press of the Pioneers in New York in 1934. 189 pages, indexed.


Huguenot Genealogies: A Revised and Selected Preliminary List 2001.

Arthur Louis Finnell, Editor. This 2nd revised edition of the 2006 reprint of the original 1995 collection of books and articles on families in Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society. It has about 700 titles. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenot Heritage: The History and Contributions of the Huguenots in Britain.

Dr. Robin D. Gwynn, Author. Written in 1985 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Good overview of the movement in France and also in exile. Includes an extensive discussion of the Fontaine family, as well as Huguenot crafts and trades and their place in the societies of England and Ireland. Published in London and Boston by Routledge & Kegan Paul in 1985, a revised edition was published by Sussex Academic Press in 2001. The 2nd edition is 261 pages, indexed, and a bibliography. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Huguenot Merchants and the Protestant International in the Seventeenth Century.

J. F. Bosher, Author. Published in the William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, Volume LII, No. 1. January 1995. pp. 77-102.


The Huguenot Migration in Europe and America, Its Cause and Effect.

C. Malcolm B. Gilman, Author. Originally published in 1962 in Red Bank, New Jersey, by the Arlington Laboratory for Clinical and Historical Research. Reprinted in Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, by Chancellor Press. Paper identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenot Pedigrees.

Charles Edmund Lart, author. Includes descriptions of coats of arms and sources of genealogical and biographical data, with over 1,500 names in the index. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenot Politics 1601-1622.

James S. Valone, Author. Includes a bibliography and index. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press. 1994. 250 pages.


The Huguenot Population of France, 1600-1685: The Demographic Fate and Customs of a Religious Minority.

Philip Benedict, Author. Philadelphia, PA: The American Philosophical Society. 1994. 164 pages.


Huguenot Refugees In The Settling of Colonial America.

Peter Steven Gannon, Editor. Includes a bibliography and index. New York: The Huguenot Society of America. 1985. 421 pages.


Huguenot Settlements in America: A Study.

William Prall, Author. Read at a meeting of the Huguenot Society of America on January 16, 1928. New York: Huguenot Society of America. 1928. 19 pages.


Updated! Huguenot Settlements in Ireland.

Grace Lawless Lee, Author. Details the many small and scattered Huguenot settlements in Ireland. Discussed are the settlements of Cork, including an account on Jacques (James) Fontaine. Based on a thesis which was awarded the Blake National History Scholarship of Trinity College, Dublin. Published in London, New York, and Toronto by Longmans, Green & Co. in 1936. Republished in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1999. A 2009 edition is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s.

Published in Baltimore, Maryland, by the Genealogical Publishing Company, and published on CD on Family Archives GPC7600. The CD has a searchable name and text index for sixteen Huguenot works separately published by the Genealogical Publishing Company’s subsidiary, Clearfield Company. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenot Wars: An Eyewitness Account.

Julien Coudy, Compiler and Editor. Translated by Julie Kernan. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Company. 1969.


“The Huguenots.”

Article listed by F.M.A. in The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 9, No. 8, July 1844, 353; accessed through “American Periodicals Series (APS) Online” [database] at www.proquest.com. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenots.

Arthur James Grant, Editor. Includes a bibliography. Reprint of the 1934 edition, published in Hamden, CT, by Archon Books in 1969. 255 pages.


“The Huguenots.”

Article by Mark Greengrass in Europe, 1450 to 1789 (Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World), a book edited by Jonathan Dewald, Volume 3, published in 2004 in New York by Charles Scribner’s Sons, pp. 214-217. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenots.

Geoffrey Treasure, Author. Published in New Haven, Connecticut, by Yale University Press in 2013. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenots: A Biography of a Minority.

George A. Rothrock, Author. Includes a bibliography and index. Chicago: Nelson Hall. 1979. 201 pages.


The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685-1787: The Enlightenment Debate on Toleration.

Geoffrey Adams, Author. Published for the Canadian Corporation for the Studies in Religion. Studies in Religion, Volume 12. Includes bibliography and index. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 1991. 335 pages.


The Huguenots and Ireland: Anatomy of an Emigration.

Edric Caldicott, Hugh Gough, and Jean-Paul Pition, Editors. Papers delivered at the Dublin Colloquium on the Huguenot Refuge in Ireland, 1685-1985, held April 9-12, 1985. Includes a bibliography and index, and includes a number of references to the Fontaine family. Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, Ireland: The Glendale Press. 1987. 444 pages.


Huguenots and Papists.

David Buisseret, Author. A history of France and the Huguenots in the 16th century. Includes a bibliography and maps. London: Ginn. 1972. 128 pages.


The Huguenots: Fighters for God and Human Freedom.

Otto Zoff, Author. Translated from German by Ernst Basch and Jo Mayo. New York: L. B. Fischer. 1942. 340 pages.


The Huguenots in America: A Refugee People in New World Society.

Jon Butler, Author. Covers the Huguenot migration to America and gives a detailed history of the settlements of Boston, New York, and South Carolina. Originally published in Cambridge, MA, by Harvard University Press in 1983, most recently in 1992. 264 pages.


Huguenots in Britain and their French Background, 1550-1800: Contributions to the Historical Conference of the Huguenot Society of London.

Irene Scouloudi, Editor. Conference held on September 24-25, 1985. Includes bibliography and index. Totowa, NJ: Barnes & Noble Books. 1987. 248 pages.


The Huguenots in England, Immigration and Settlement c. 1550-1700.

Bernard Cottret, Author. Includes bibliography and index. Published in New York by Cambridge University Press in 1991. 317 pages.


The Huguenots in France and America.

Hannah F. Lee, Author. This is a 2005 reprint of an 1843 edition that includes almost 100 pages on the history of the Huguenots in America, particularly at Oxford, Massachusetts, New Rochelle New York, New Paltz New York, Frenchtown Rhode Island, and Jamestown South Carolina. It also includes information on the arrival in Boston of families who later settled in Maine, New York, and Rhode Island and those who settled on the Santee River of South Carolina. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“The Huguenots of America.”

Article in The Knickerbocker [or New York Monthly Magazine], Volume 53, No. 3, March 1859, 234; accessed through “American Periodicals Series (APS) Online” [database] at www.proquest.com. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“The Huguenots of Colonial North Carolina.”

W. Keats Sparrow, Author. A presentation made on 4 April 2009 to the Huguenot Society of North Carolina and published in A History of the Huguenot Society of North Carolina, edited by Roger Kammerer and published by the Huguenot Society of North Carolina in 2013, pp. 25-39. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Updated! The Huguenots of Colonial South Carolina.

Arthur Henry Hirsch, Author, with a new introduction by Bertrand van Ruymbeke. Earlier editions published in 1928 and 1962. Includes a bibliography and index. It includes genealogies and biographical data on 17 pioneer families. Published in cooperation with the Institute for Southern Studies and the South Carolinian Society of the University of South Carolina. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 1999. 338 pages. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Huguenots of London.

Dr. Robin Gwynn, Author. Includes a bibliography and index. Brighton and Portland: Alpha Press. 1998. 67 pages.


The Huguenots of Virginia.

William Pope Dabney, Author. Published in The Magazine of American History with Notes and Queries. VIII. 1882.


The Huguenots or Early French in New Jersey.

Albert F. Kochler, Author. This 2007 reprint of the 1955 book recounts the 1677 Huguenot settlement at Hackensack, New Jersey, and the settlement at Princeton a few years later. Includes data on over 70 New Jersey families. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Huguenots, Planters, Portarlington: Portarlington, a Planted Town.

John Stocks Powell, Author. 2nd Edition. The role of Huguenots in Portarlington, Ireland. Includes bibliography and index. York: Frenchchurch Press. 1994. 176 pages.


The Huguenots: Their Settlements, Churches, and Industries in England and Ireland.

This 2003 reprint of the 1868 edition includes a history of the French Huguenots and their emigration from France to England and Ireland. Includes biographies of about 300 Huguenot refugees who settled in Great Britain. The book includes a section on the Huguenots in America by G. P. Disoway, which focuses on Huguenots in Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Humanists and Reformers, A History of the Renaissance and Reformation.

Bard Thompson, Author. Includes bibliography and index. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. 1996. 742 pages.


“Ignatius Few to Thomas Fountain, Warren County, Georgia, 1806.”

Ignatius Few appears in an abstracted transaction presumably for the sale of property to Thomas Fountain dated 13 April 1806. The witnesses were William Few, Francis Spann, and Solomon Lockett. Thomas Fontaine (1752-1808) was a son of Francis Fontaine, Jr. and Mary Glenisson. Francis Spann was a son-in-law of John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 270 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 399 and 400.


“Index Book Showing Fontaine, Fountain Entries for Revolutionary Claims Filed in South Carolina between 1783 and 1786.”

Janie Revill’s book, Copy of the Original Index Book Showing the Revolutionary Claims Filed in South Carolina between August 20, 1783 and August 31, 1786 kept by James McCall, Auditor General, includes the following Fontaine entries: John Fontaine (Revill page 111, entry pages 97, 161, nos. returned 14); Valentine Nicholas Fontaine (Revill page 111, entry page 156, no no. returned; unlikely related to the Jaques Fontaine family); William Fountain (Revill p. 112, nos. returned 24, 92); Jemima Fountain [Fontaine] (Revill p. 112, no. returned 40); Peter Fountain [Fontaine] (Revill p. 112, no. returned 56); and Paul Fountain (Revill p. 112, no. returned 114). Janie Revill’s book was published in 1969 in Baltimore, Maryland, by the Genealogical Publishing Co.


Index to the Registers of the French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, Parts I-IV Baptisms and Marriages 1600-1840, Four Separate Indexes.

Published in Lymington, England, by the Huguenot Society of London. 1896.


Interrelationships of the Maury, Moore, Grymes, and Dawson Families.

Details on the family of Rev. James Maury, father of Rev. Walker Maury, who married Mary Grymes. Their daughter was Penelope Johnstone Maury. Mary Grymes was the daughter of Ludwell Grymes and Mary Dawson, based on facts from her 1787 will. The article provides other details on the family of Ludwell Grymes through his daughter Elizabeth Johnson Moore, who died in Robertson County, Tennessee. Included in an article, “Maury-Moore-Grymes-Dawson,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1897. p. 208.


Intimate Virginiana: A Century of Maury Travels by Land and Sea.

Anne Fontaine Maury, Author. One of the best accounts of the early Maury family. Published in 1941 in Richmond, VA, by the Dietz Press, Publishers. 336 pages.


“Inventory and Estate Sale of John Fontaine, New Bern (Craven), 1757, 1758.”

These abstracted records document that Elizabeth Fontaine took inventory of John Fontaine’s estate on 5 August 1757 and held an estate sale on 10 May 1758. Buyers listed: Joseph Martin; Thomas Moss; Joseph Carruthers; George Cornegs; William Carruthers; William Davis; Josiah Ridgway; Mr. Fenner; Cab. Lovick; Richard Hall; Cab. Lovitt; Mrs. Fontaine; James Core; Charles Donds; Richard Cogdell; James Green Jr.; James Davis; Leven Lane; Mat. . . . [illegible]. Published by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., in his abstracts, Early Records of North Carolina, Volume III – Loose Papers and Related Materials 1712-1798, Keysville, VA, by the author in 1992, p. 26, item 265. Dr. Bradley explains that the two sources are in the North Carolina State Archives, the first are loose papers (SS889-898) in 10 boxes and the second are two will books in the Secretary of State records, SS875 and SS876.


“Inventory and Estate Sale of Richard McGraw, 8 June 1757, Craven County.”

The inventory and estate sale of Richard McGraw both took place on 8 June 1757, the list of buyers include John Fontaine. Sold by Jos. Carruthers, sheriff, Andrew Scott, adminr., and James Falconer, clerk. Published by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., in his abstracts, Early Records of North Carolina, Volume III – Loose Papers and Related Materials 1712-1798, Keysville, VA, by the author in 1992, p. 52, item 516. Dr. Bradley explains that the two sources are in the North Carolina State Archives, the first are loose papers (SS889-898) in 10 boxes and the second are two will books in the Secretary of State records, SS875 and SS876.


“Israel Fountain Letter Left at Sparta, Georgia, Post Office, October 28, 1816.”

Israel Fountain appears on an October 28, 1816, list of people with left letters at the Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia, post office. This appears in an abstract of the Wednesday, November 13, 1816, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 621 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 1: 1808-1818, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Jacob Family – John Jeremiah Jacob Married Anne Overton Fontaine, 1811.”

A history of the descendants of John Jacob (1560-1627) of Dover, England. John Jeremiah Jacob (1778-1852), one of three children of William Jacob (1752-1792) and Maria Monk, was married in 1811 with Anne Overton Fontaine. They moved from Maryland to Kentucky, where Anne died in 1819. Their three children are listed: Matilda Prather Jacob; Mary Jacob; and John Jeremiah Jacob. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 5, originally published in Baltimore in 1915, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 330.


“James Buchanan, The Bachelor of the White House: An Inquiry on the Subject of Feminine Influence on the Life of Our Fifteenth President.”

In this article by Dr. Philip G. Auchampaugh, he cites an assessment of Buchanan’s presidency and his bachelorhood by Sarah Myttin Maury, entitled The Statemen of American in 1846, a work that Maury dedicated to Buchanan. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 20, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1939. p. 227.


James Maury Elected as College Student at William & Mary, Rev. Francis Fontaine in Attendance of Meeting, August 1738.

At the meeting on August 30, 1738, James Maury was unanimously elected as a college student. Mr. Francis Fontaine was one of five in attendance who voted for Maury. Mr. Fontaine is also documented as being in attendance at the meetings on June 26, 1738, and July 31, 1741. In the July meeting, James “Mooray” was elected usher of the Grammar school pro tempore to replace the late Mr. Francis Robinson. In a note to this article, it explains that James Maury was son of Mathew Maury and Mary Anne Fontaine, French Huguenots who came to Virginia in 1718. James was born in 1717 and died in 1769; he was rector of Frederickville Parish, Virginia. He married Mary Walker, daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker, the Kentucky explorer. Continuation of article, “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College - 1729-1784,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 1, No. 4, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in April 1893. p. 219.


James Maury Land Petition on the ‘Alligany,’ 1752.

James Maury appears on a list, entry 23, for “10,000 acres in Augusta to begin on Alligany on the north side of the dividing line between Carolina and Virginia and to continue up the river for complement.” The next entry, 24, is dated March 3, 1752, to Thomas Meriwether for 10,000 acres in Augusta beginning above Maury’s 10,000 acres on the river. Entry 21 is also dated March 3, 1752, so presumably Maury’s is of the same date. List compiled under an order issued November 29, 1769, by the House of Burgesses for “List of Early Land Patents and Grants Petitioned for in Virginia up to 1769, preserved among the Washington Papers,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 5, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1897. p. 179.


James Maury Letter to Philip Ludwell about Emigration from Virginia to the Carolinas, ca. 1756.

James Maury wrote around 1756 that hundreds of families have left the waters of the Potomac, James River, and Roanoke, passing through Bedford on their way to Carolina. He notes that many are industrious and are leaving Virginia even though there is available fertile lands to move south, leaving behind family and friends. He notes that the rapid loss of inhabitants is to Virginia’s detriment. “Emigration from Virginia to North Carolina and the Other Southern Colonies,” by James Maury to the Honorable Philip Ludwell around 1756, taken from Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, p. 431, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1905. pp. 95-96.


James Maury’s Views of the Influence of the Inhabitants of the James River, 1759.

A footnote cites Memoirs of a Huguenot Family in which in 1759 James Maury, parson of Fredericksville parish, mentions “gentlemen living in the lower parts of the country . . . none of them knowing anything of the back country.” The citation supports an argument in the article that the inhabitants along the James River had undue influence in the state. A chapter from Fairfax Harrison’s book, Land Marks of Old Prince William, entitled “When the Convicts Came,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 30, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1922. p. 259.


James Morray [Maury] Elected Usher at Grammar School, 1741.

At a meeting of the President and Masters, including Mr. Fr. [Francis] Fontaine on July 31, 1741, “Mr. James Morray is elected usher of the Grammar School pro tempore in the room of Mr. Francis Robinson deceased.” In a footnote, it explains that James Maury was son of Matthew Maury and Mary Anne Fontaine who came to Virginia in 1718. It provides a few details of James Maury’s life, cites “Virginia Historical College,” Volume 5, p. 123, and provides a transcript of a February 1741 letter from Dr. James Blair to the Bishop of London about Maury. Included in a continuation article, “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 1, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in April 1893. p. 220.


“James Vaas Marriage with Elizabeth Brain Maury, daughter of Col. Abram Maury.”

An article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, in which he cites that James Vaas, native of Scotland, married around 1798 with Elizabeth Brain Maury, daughter of Colonel Abram Maury of Madison County. Elizabeth was his second wife. James’ half-sister, Jane Morrison, was married to William Brooke, whose grandfather, also named William Brooke, was married to a Fontaine. This elder William Brooke was the son of Robert Brooke, Jr., a member of the Knights of the Golden Horseshoe [as was John Fontaine, Abraham Maury’s uncle]. Appears in the continuation article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke of Morgantown, WV, entitled “The Brooke Family of Virginia, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1906. p. 107.


“James Wheeler Land Sale to John Fontaine, Warren County, Georgia, 1804.”

There are five Fontaine-related transactions recorded consecutively in the Warren County records. The first was for James Wheeler selling land to John Fontaine dated 18 February 1804 that had been originally granted to Susannah Wall. Witnesses to the transaction were Thomas Fontaine and David Cox. This appears in an abstracted list on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, page 399.


“James Wheeler Land Sale to James Allen, Warren County, Georgia, 1804.”

James Wheeler appears in an abstracted list as selling land to James Allen on 28 February 1804. Adjoining landowners were John Fontain, John Greyson, and Susannah Wall. Witnesses were John Fontain and Susannah Wheeler. This appears on pages 213-214 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, pages 509-510.


Jefferson the Virginian.

Dumas Malone, Author. Volume 1 of this series discusses Rev. James Maury at some length. Maury’s son, also named James Maury, and Thomas Jefferson were lifelong friends. Washington appointed the younger James Maury as the first American Consul to England at Liverpool. Published in Boston by Little Brown & Co. in 1948. 6 volumes. Volume 1 is 484 pages.


Jefferson’s Nephews: A Frontier Tragedy.

Boynton Merrill, Jr., Author. Fascinating material on Kentucky 1800-1810 involving families related to the Fontaines in Virginia as well as Kentucky. Good reference for anyone with ancestors in Kentucky. Published by Princeton University Press in 1976. 462 pages, indexed.


“Jethro Darden Land Sale to James Mathews, Warren County, Georgia, 1805.”

Jethro Darden appears in two separate abstracted transactions for sale (presumably land) to James Mathews both dated 11 January 1805. Thomas Fountaine is listed as the witness to the first transaction; the second transaction was witnessed by him, Thomas Fontain, and John Brooks. These appear on pages 207-208 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the originals are from Book B, pages 339-340 for the first transaction and pages 375-376 for the second transaction.


“Jethro Darden Land Sale to John Fontain, Warren County, Georgia, 1805.”

There are five Fontaine-related transactions recorded consecutively in the Warren County records. The fourth was for Jethro Darden selling presumably land to John Fontain on 11 January 1805. Adjoining landowners were Timothy Mathews and Peter Perkins, deceased. Witnesses to the transaction were John Brooks and Ellender Darden. This appears in an abstracted list on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, pages 404-405.


“Jethro Darden Land Sale to Thomas Fontain, Warren County, Georgia, 1805.”

There are five Fontaine-related transactions recorded consecutively in the Warren County records. The fifth was for Jethro Darden selling presumably land to Thomas Fontain on 11 January 1805. Adjoining landowners were Ignatius Few, William Wilkins, and Peter Perkins, deceased. Witness to the transaction was John Brooks. This appears in an abstracted list on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, pages 405-406.


John Butts’ Revolutionary Service; Son-in-Law of Mary Anne Maury Claiborne.

John Butts is included in a list of 38 men who formed a troop of cavalry raised by Captain Robert Bolling which served in the Revolutionary War in the years 1779, 1780, and 1781. The article lists the 38 men, with a notation that John Butts married Mary Anne Claiborne, daughter of Daniel Parke Claiborne and his wife Mary Anne Maury. Included in the article “Revolutionary Services of Robert Bolling, of Petersburg, VA., with a Roster of His Troop,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 12, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in October 1904. p. 156.


John Calvin: A Sixteenth Century Portrait.

William J. Bouwsma, Author. Biography of John Calvin, 1509-1564. Includes bibliography and index. New York: Oxford University Press. 1988. 310 pages.


John Fontaine Appointed Captain, June 1780.

In June 1780, John Fontaine, Esquire, was appointed captain to replace John Salmon, Esquire, who had resigned. John Fontaine and five others produced their commissions as captains and took the oath. Continuation of article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 9, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1902. pp. 416-417.


John Fontaine Appointed to Take Lists of Two Companies of Militias, March 1783.

On March 29, 1783, John Fontaine was appointed to take a List of Souls, the List of Tythes, and a list of Taxable Property in James Tarrant’s and John Alexander’s companies of militia. Continuation of article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 11, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1903. p. 92.


Updated! “John Fontaine Elected to Bank of Columbus Board of Directors, 1838.”

John Fontaine appears in an abstract of an article reporting that at a meeting of the Bank of Columbus Board of Directors on Monday, 5 November 1838, Fontaine and six others were elected to the Board of Directors. The others were John Warren, Thomas Preston Jr., James Boykin, Edward Cary, and George Hargraves, Jr. This was John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This abstract was made from the Thursday, 22 November 1838, issue of the Columbus Sentinel and Herald. This appears on page 670 in an article entitled “Articles from Columbus Sentinel and Herald” of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5: 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


Updated! “John Fontaine in List of Stockholders, Bank of Columbus, 1839.”

John Fontaine appears in two abstracts from the Georgia Journal in a list of stockholders of the Bank of Columbus in Columbus, Georgia. These abstracts were made from the Tuesday, 16 April 1839, issue and the Saturday, 20 April 1839, issue. This was John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). The first abstract appears on page 262 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5: 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press. The second abstract appears on page 531 from “Articles from Tri-Weekly Chronicle & Sentinel” published in the same volume.


“John Fontaine in List of Stockholders, Bank of Columbus, 1842.”

John Fontaine was one of 18 stockholders of the Bank of Columbus listed in the Tuesday, 31 May 1842, issue of the Southern Recorder. This was John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This abstract appears in Tad Evans’ Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings (Southern Recorder), in Volume VI: 1842-1844, published in 1995 in Savannah, Georgia, by the author.


“John Fontaine in Warren County, Georgia, Tax Digest, 1817.”

John Fontaine appears twice in the 1817 Warren County tax digest in Captain Neals District No. 153. He appears on p. 31, lines 21-24, listed as John Fontaine, 1 poll, 1 slave, Fontaine & Hargraves, stock in trade $4,000, tax $13.12.5. On p. 32, line 15, he is listed as agent for George Hargraves, 1 poll, 8 slaves, 202½ acres in Twiggs County, 202½ acres in Morgan County, 226 acres in Warren County on the Ogeechy, 800 acres in Warren County on Briar Creek, and 2 acres in Warrenton, 2 pleasure wheels, and 1 house and lot in Warrenton $2,200. No tax listed. Appears in Warren County Georgia Tax Digest 1817, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0159189.


“John Fontaine in Warren County, Georgia, Tax Digest, 1818.”

John Fontaine appears twice in the 1818 Warren County tax digest in Captain Neal’s District No. 153, first on p. 41, line 6, for 1 poll, Fontaine & Hargraves stock in trade valued at $5,000, with tax of $15.93.7½, and second on p. 42, line 11, for George Hargraves, 1 poll, 8 slaves, 202 ½ acres, in Twiggs County, borders no. 286, tax of $11.56.2½ and 202½ acres in Twiggs County, borders no. 13. Appears in Warren County Georgia Tax Digest 1818, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0159189, reviewed on 13 October 2012 by Brian H. Nilsson.


“John Fontaine, George Hargraves and Others in Lawsuit Against Terry Oliver, Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

John Fontaine, George Hargraves, and others appear in an abstract from the Georgia Journal for a court ordered sale of 340 acres of land of Terry Oliver to satisfy a claim by Fontaine, Hargraves and others. This abstract was made from the “Warren Sheriff Sales” entries in the Thursday, January 31, 1833, issue. The abstract appears on page 511 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4: 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fontaine Land Sale to James Allen, Warren County, Georgia, 1804.”

There are five Fontaine-related transactions recorded consecutively in the Warren County records. The third was for John Fontaine selling land originally granted to Susannah Wall to James Allen on 21 February 1805. Witnesses to the transaction were Thomas Fontaine and David Cox. This appears in an abstracted list on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, pages 401-402


Updated! “John Fontaine Letter Remaining at Warrenton, Georgia, Post Office, 1828.”

John Fontaine is listed in an article as having a letter remaining at the Warrenton, Warren County, Georgia, post office on 1 January 1828. This was John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This appears in an abstract of the Monday evening, 7 January 1828, issue in Tad Evans’ book, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings (Southern Recorder), Volume II: 1828-1832, self-published by the author in 1995 in Savannah, Georgia.


Updated! “John Fontaine Member of Trustees, Summerville Male Academy, Russell County, Alabama, 1839.”

John Fontaine is listed as one of five trustees of Summerville Male Academy in Russell County, Alabama, together with Robert S. Hardaway, George W. Dillard, William P. Yonge, and George H. Schley, in an abstracted article that published in the Wednesday, 4 December 1839, issue of the Columbus Sentinel and Herald. This was John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866) who lived in Columbus, Georgia, in Muscogee County, that borders Russell County, Alabama. This abstract appears on page 752 in the article “Articles from Columbus Sentinel and Herald” in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5: 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fontaine on Muscogee Superior Court Grand Jury; April Term 1839.”

John Fontaine and 20 others served on a Grand Jury in the April term 1839 in Muscogee County (Georgia) Superior Court. This is John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866) who settled in Columbus, in Muscogee County, from Warren County, Georgia, around 1829. This abstract appears on page 714 in the article “Articles from Columbus Sentinel and Herald” in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5: 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fontaine, Patrick Henry Recommended to Governor to Serve in the Commission of the Peace, August 1779.”

John Fontaine, Patrick Henry, and twenty others are recommended to the Governor in August 1779 as being proper persons to serve in the Commission of the Peace for Henry County. An article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1902. p. 266.


John Fontaine Sold Beef to Commissioner of Provisions, Henry Co., presumably before June 1782.

John Fontaine sold 215 pounds of beef for £2.0.0 to Jesse Heard, Commissioner of Provisions. This transaction is undated but was presumably before June 1782. Continuation of article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 10, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1902. p. 240.


John Fontaine’s Company Ordered to Assist General Greene, March 1781.

List of militia ordered from Henry County to the assistance of General Greene, dated March 11, 1781, includes John Fontain’s Company, in which 14 men are named. List submitted by C. B. Bryant. Continuation of article, “Henry County, From its Formation in 1776 to the End of the Eighteenth Century, et. seq.,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 17, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1909. p. 193.


John Fontaine’s Journal Description of Governor Spotswood’s Expedition in 1716.

Cites John Fontaine’s journal which is basically the sole source of details about Governor Spotswood 1716 expedition across the Blue Ridge Mountains. “The Use and Abuse of Forests by the Virginia Indians,” by Hu Maxwell of the U.S. Forest Service, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 19, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1910. pp. 93, 94.


“John Fontaine Lawsuit Against Henry Ivy, Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

John Fontaine appears in an abstract from the Georgia Journal for a court ordered sale of four negroes of Henry Ivy to satisfy a claim by John Fontaine. This abstract was made from the “Warren Sheriff Sales” entries in the Thursday, January 3, 1833, issue. The abstract appears on page 501 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4: 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fontaine Lawsuit Against Robert Hill, Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

John Fontaine appears in an abstract from the Georgia Journal for a court ordered sale of six negroes of Robert Hill to satisfy a claim by John Fontaine. This abstract was made from the “Warren Sheriff Sales” entries in the Thursday, January 31, 1833, issue. The abstract appears on page 511 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4: 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fontaine/Fountain, John G. Winters, and Others Lawsuit Against Rowell Adams, Warren County, Georgia; 1832.”

John Fontaine or Fountain appears in several abstracts from the Georgia Journal together with John G. Winters and others for a court ordered sale of Rowell Adams’ interest in five negroes to satisfy a claim by Fontaine/Fountain, Winters, and others. These abstracts were made from the “Warren Sheriff Sales” entries in the Thursday, November 8, 1832, and Monday, November 26, 1832, issues. The abstracts appear on pages 484 and 491 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4: 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fountain Land Sale to George W. Hardwick, Warren County, Georgia, 1815.”

This is one of two transactions recorded together in the Warren County deed book. John Fountain appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to George W. Hardwick dated 15 December 1815. Adjoining landowners were Thomas Fountain, Robert A. Beall, David McCrary, William Porter, and Henry Peeples. The original grantees were Darling McDaniel and Thomas Brannen; prior landowners were Peter Perkins and Jethro Dardin. Witnesses to the transaction were Ignatius Few, Joseph Culpepper, and Shadrack Slatter. This appears to be a transaction between brothers-in-law, John Fontaine (1792-1866) and his sister Mary Fontaine’s husband George W. Hardwick. Adjoining landowner William Porter was a son-in-law of John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 268 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, page 351.


“John Fountain on List of List of Tax Defaulters for 1812, Warren County, Georgia.”

John Fountain appears on this 1812 list of tax defaulters as a resident of Captain Malone’s district of Warren County, Georgia. This appears in an abstract of the Wednesday, 22 July 1812, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 141 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 1: 1808-1818, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“John Fountain Sr. Land Sale to David McCoy, Warren County, Georgia, 1813.”

John Fountain, Sr,, appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to David McCoy dated 29 May 1813. Adjoining landowners were David W. Waggoner and Benjamin B. Beall. The land was originally granted to John Dysart and Robert Christmas. Thomas Fountain is listed as deceased; it was presumably as an adjoining landowner. Witnesses to the transaction were William Porter, George B. Waggoner, and Dennis L. Ryan. William Porter was a son-in-law of John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 257 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 109-110.


“John Fountain Sr. Land Sale to Henry Handley, Warren County, Georgia, 1814.”

John Fountain, Sr, appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to Henry Handley dated 10 October 1814. The adjoining landowner was Fountain Flewellin. The land was originally granted to Robert Christmas; other prior owners were Archilaus Flewellin, David McCoy, and John Stith. Witnesses to the transaction were John Fountain, William Porter, George W. Hardwick, and Susannah Fountain. William Porter was a son-in-law of John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. George Hardwick was the husband of Mary Fontaine, daughter of Thomas Fontaine and his wife Clarissa. This abstract appears on page 257 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 111-112.


“John Ingram, late of Jefferson County, Georgia, Sale of Real and Personal Property; David Ingram and William Fountain, Executors, 1826.”

Announcement of an estate sale of the estate of John Ingram, deceased, in Jefferson County, Georgia, the sale to take place on November 22, 1826. It was published by Ingram’s executors, David Ingram and William Fountain. It is unclear who this William Fountain was. The Ingrams were from Dobbs County, North Carolina, and were neighbors and likely intermarried with the Brutons who intermarried with the Fontaines. This appears in an abstract of the Tuesday, 17 October 1826, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 537 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 3: 1824-1828, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


John Lewis Married Mary Anne Fontaine Armistead.

John Lewis, son of Colonel Fielding Lewis, supposedly married five times. His fourth wife was Mary Anne Fontaine Armistead, a widow, who had a daughter who married Keeling Terrill. John married a fifth time with Mildred Carter, the widow of Robert Mercer. Continuation article, “Lewis Family of Warner Hall,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1901. p. 50.


“John Stith Land Sale to John Fountain, Warren County, Georgia, 1812.”

John Stith appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to John Fountain dated 22 January 1812. The land was originally granted to Robert Christmas and another previous owner was Joseph Landrum. Witnesses to the transaction were Alex Thomson and Dennis Ryan. Alex Thomson was the husband of Lucy Fontaine (1755-1813) and brother-in-law to Thomas Fontaine. This abstract appears on page 257 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 108-109.


John W. Maury Indenture, August 31, 1825.

John W Maury makes provisions for payment of his debts and provision for support of his infant son, James Maury, and secures for himself a comfortable maintenance. The letters continue to state that he is feeble of body and ill health being unable to attend to his own business in a matter which the situation demands. For $1 he gets 3,000 acres which includes 2 plantations plus all personal property including slaves. It’s a life estate as consequence of his marriage to Susanna Hubard. The letter also states that John W. Maury shall afford James Maury a suitable support including his education. The contract is to be ended at the death of either John Maury or Susanna Hubard. John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker. Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


John Walker Maury; His Lineage and Life.

William Arden Maury, Author (son of John Walker Maury). Descendant of Matthew Maury. Published in Washington, D.C., by W. F. Roberts, Press, in 1916. William Maury prepared this sketch on his father at the request of the Columbia Historical Society. 18 pages.


John Wesley Tippins Family Bible.

B. D. Dubberly, Notary Public of Tattnall County, Georgia, certified on June 1, 1956, that he had examined the family Bible of John Wesley Tippins, who was born on March 8, 1811, in Tattnall County, and recorded the referenced information that Francis Fontaine married Jemima Johnson in Dobbs County, North Carolina, around 1770. At the time of his certification, the Bible was in the possession of Leroy Glenn Tippins of Rochelle, Georgia.


“Joseph Shelton Watson to David Watson, Quotes William Winston Fontaine Letter.”

Thomas S. Watson, Contributor. In one letter between these brothers, Joseph quotes from the late Colonel William Winston Fontaine about a dinner he attended on February 9, 1859, at the Apollo in Williamsburg. General Henry A. Wise was one of the speakers at the dinner in 1859, and he told of how he had been in this room as a boy with an older gentlemen, who had told him of a gathering that he had once attended in this same room with George Washington, Patrick Henry, George Mason, Richard Henry Lee, and Thomas Jefferson. “Letters from William and Mary College, 1798-1801: Joseph Shelton Watson to David Watson,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 29, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1921. p. 163.


The Journal of John Fontaine, An Irish Huguenot Son in Spain and Virginia 1710-1719.

Edward Porter Alexander, Editor. John Fontaine was a son of Jaques Fontaine. He was the first to go to Virginia, where some of his siblings followed. He did not stay in Virginia, eventually settling in Wales. Published in 1972 in Williamsburg, VA, by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. 99 pages.


“Judge Peter Lyons’ Letters to His Granddaughter; He Was Attorney for Rev. James Maury in ‘Parson’s Cause.’”

Peter Lyons was a native of Ireland who came to Virginia around 1750 and studied law in Williamsburg under James Power, whose daughter, Mary Catherine, he married. The couple settled in Hanover County, Virginia, and lived at a place called “Studley.” He was the attorney for the Reverend James Maury in the famous court case, the Parson’s Cause. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 8, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1927, p. 184.


Judge Peter Lyons Was the Reverend James Maury’s Lawyer in the ‘Parson’s Cause,’ 1763.

In the introduction to the transcription of this series of letters, dated 1787-1798, is a brief genealogy of John Dandridge’s family and that of John Hopkins. Hopkins, to whom the letters were addressed, was a prosperous merchant in Richmond and U.S. Commissioner of Loans. His wife was Lucy Lyons, daughter of Judge Peter Lyons who was Rev. James Maury’s lawyer in the famous “Parson’s Cause” in Hanover County in 1763. “Letters of John Dandridge to John Hopkins,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 20, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1912. p. 149.


The Jury Lists of South Carolina 1778-1779, Includes Francis Fountain [Fontaine].

Francis Fountain is listed as having served as a petit juror in St. Paul’s Parish in South Carolina in 1778/1779. It is unclear whether this was Francis “Frank” Fontaine Jr. or his son, Francis Fontaine III. Book by Ge Lee Corley Hendrix and Morn McKoy Lindsay published in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1980, p. 21.


Knights of the Horseshoe, a Traditionary Tale of the Cocked Hat Gentry in the Old Dominion.

Dr. William A. Caruthers, Author. A novel based on John Fontaine’s journal. This book is a reprint of the first edition that was published in 1845. It was originally published serially in the Magnolia from January to October 1841. Published in Chapel Hill by the University of North Carolina Press in 1970. 248 pages.


Lake Maury in Virginia.

Alexander Crosby Brown, Author. Includes a brief biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury, for whom the lake is named. Published in Newport News, Virginia, by The Mariners’ Museum, Museum Publication No. 1, Variant Series, 1936. 51 pages.


Land Dispute Between Peter Fontaine and Etienne Chaistain.

Includes details of the land dispute between Peter Fontaine and Etienne Chaistain [Stephen Chastain]. Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, edited by H. R. McIlwaine, Volume IV - October 25, 1721 - October 28, 1739. Published in Richmond, VA, in 1930.


The Last Revolution: 1688 and the Creation of the Modern World.

Patrick Dillon, Author. Published in London by Random House UK in 2006 as Volume 769 of the Pimlico Series. The book includes a number of references to Jaque Fontaine the Huguenot in the context of the coming French Revolution. The book is 290 pages.


Lee, the Soul of Honor.

John E. Hobeika, Author, with a foreword by Lyon G. Tyler. Discusses the many Christian heros of the South, including Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Boston by Christopher Publishing Co. in 1932. 303 pages. A review of Hobeika’s book appears in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 13, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1932, p. 296.


Letter about Reverend James Maury, to the Bishop of London, February 4, 1741/2.

In a letter dated February 4, 1741/2, William Gooch wrote to the Bishop of London, stating that “My Lord, I am now to Introduce to Your Lordship the Bearer Mr. Maurie, a young Gentleman brought up at our College, of a prudent and regular Conduct, for Holy Orders. His Father is a French Refugee, lives in good Credit in this Country, and as he is Master of a pretty Estate, is able to provide well for his Son had he no other Prospect of Support; But since the last two Gentlemen were recommended to Your Lordship, we have two Parishes Vacant, and in all likelihood, before Mr. Maurie can come back, there will be a third. . . .” In a footnote, it explains that Mr. Maurie is Rev. James Maury, who received the King’s Bounty for Virginia on June 29, 1742. Bishop Meade says he spent one year in King William County. Appears from British Transcripts, Fulham MSS, Virginia No. 180, Bishop of London. The letter is one in the article “The Virginia Clergy,” edited by Rev. G. McLaren Brydon, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 33, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1925. pp. 60-61.


“Letter by Mr. F. Maury from James Maury to David Ross, May 24, 1781.”

Letter dated May 24, 1781, when James Maury was at Point of Fork. He indicates that arrangements have been made to have tobacco and vessels sent to Charleston, a project approved by Lord Cornwallis in Petersburg. James Maury asks Ross if he will consult with the governor to obtain permission to proceed and send word via dispatches to Maury’s brother, the carrier of this letter. F. Maury and James Maury are presumably Fontaine and James Maury, sons of the Reverend James Maury. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 117-118.


“Letter by Mr. James Maury from Major Charles Dick to Governor Thomas Jefferson, January 23, 1781.”

Maury wrote this letter from Major Charles Dick on January 23, 1781, in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He thanks Jefferson for his letter of the 15th. He comments that he will keep watch for the enemy and will keep the small arms factory in Fredericksburg operating using his own credit for supplies. Note: the small arms manufacturing business had been created by Virginia in 1775. This is presumably James Maury, Jr., son of the Reverend James Maury. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1652 - 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume I, published in Richmond, VA, in 1875. p. 455.


Letter by Louisiana Hubard to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, undated.

Louisiana mentions John W. Maury in an undated letter, writing in part:


“Have you seen B. Maury and Lia she inquired after ? . . . . .Mama [Susan Wilcox Hubard Maury] was at Uncle Bollings [Leneaus Bolling] today but he has not returned from Nelson yet and I expect he went by Albemarle.”....


John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker.

Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


Letter by Robert Thurston Hubard to Wilcox Hubard, December 1, 1814.

Letter written by Robert Hubard in Saratoga on December 1, 1814, to Wilcox Hubard, which states in part that:


“I suppose Philip [Judge Philip Bolling, half brother to Susan Wilcox Hubard Maury] told you that Tom and Reuben Maury went to Nelson and carried John W [John W. Maury] to Albemarle. I have not heard anything farther about him. Uncle Bolling and Thornton [attorney for Susan Hubard with regards to her husbands estates, Dr. James Thurston Hubard] have done nothing about the $1000...”


“John W [John W Maury] got Mr. Jones [overseer in Nelson County Plantations] to employ Fontaine to attend to the suits for him. As to the taxes, I do not know whether they are paid or not, the sheriff has not come here for them. Mama [Susan Wilcox Hubard Maury] event up to see Rolf Eldridge [clerk of Buckingham County] a few days ago, and got his advice about trying to take the estate out of JW [John W Maury] hands. Mr. Eldridge says he thinks there is but little doubt, but it can be done and very easy too.”


The referenced John, Tom, and Reuben were children of Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker. Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


Letter by Robert Thurston Hubard to Wilcox Hubard, 13 December 1824.

Letter written by Robert Hubard on 13 December 1824 to Edmund Wilcox Hubard in Saratog that mentions that “John W [John W Maury] I believe is in Albemarle yet. . . .” John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker. Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


Letter by Robert Thurston Hubard to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, January 18, 1825.

Letter dated January 18, 1825, which reads in part:


“ Mr. R. Eldridge [Rolfe Eldridge, clerk of Buckingham] has received an answer from Wickham. Eldridge did not put the proper questions to hime and therefore did not receive a proper answer. He wrote to him requesting him to inform him on (Eldridge) whether John W [John W Maury] had a right to depose of the profits of the estate as he chose and Wickham told him yes he did etc. Which was more than we knew before. Wickham charged $10 for his advice. Mr. Brooke is going to Richmond in a few days and Mama [Susan Wilcox Hubard Maury] has got him to consult with Wickham and see what can be done with respects to the estate etc.”


John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker.

Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


Letter by Robert Thurston Hubard to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, March 22, 1825.

This letter reads in part:


“Uncle Bolling [Leneaus Bolling son of Robert Bolling and Susanna Wilcox, the elder] left home Sunday for Lynchburg and has declined the idea of going by Nelson to see JW [John W Maury].”


John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker.

Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


Letter by Susan Hubard to John Maury, March 28, 1819.

Letter written by Susan Hubard on March 28, 1819, to her husband John Maury, which mentions that cousin Polly is to be married the 8th of April 1819. She says to give her "love to brother Tom and all my Ky brothers and sisters." Apparently, John was visiting his brother Tom and other Maury family members who were living in Louisville, Kentucky. John was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker.

Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


“Letter from Abram Maury to Governor Henry Lee, June 1, 1793.”

Maury wrote on June 1, 1793, from Orange, Virginia, explaining that he had offered himself as a candidate for the Adjutant-General’s place in Virginia. He wrote to ask for the favor of the governor’s good offices on his behalf. Maury cites his service in the Continental Army for several years. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. p. 343.


“Letter from Colonel John Syme to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Mentions William Fontaine, April 20, 1781.”

Reprint of a letter from Col. Syme to Virginia Governor Thomas Jefferson in which he complained that a certain Thomas Birch Hulett, at the direction of Mr. William Fontaine, seized two plow horses of his and took them for about a week. Other gentlemen in the county provided nothing and it is unfair. He asks Jefferson under what authority Fontaine acted. Letter dated April 20, 1781. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, in Richmond in 1881. p. 57.


“Letter from Colonel William Davies to Governor Benjamin Harrison, in Council, Mentions James Maury, February 28, 1782.”

Colonel Davies wrote to the Governor on February 28, 1782, in the War Office. He submits with his letter a plan on behalf of the officers of the Virginia Continental and State lines, to seek the countenance of the Council to support measures they have adopted to preserve the credit of their certificates. The plan is the only means to secure reimbursement as the certificates were intended. The attached paper stated that on February 10, 1782, Brigadier General Charles Scott and Colonel William Davies published a circular through which Mr. Ross had undertaken to manage their business for them and “generously refuses any compensation for services.” The group regretted seeking assistance but wanted to be reimbursed for their services by subscriptions. Mr. Ross agreed to assist them in negotiating the certificates that they received for the auditors issued to a number of individuals and businesses, includes James Maury of Fredericksburg. James Maury was presumably son of the Reverend James Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, January 1, 1782, to December 31, 1784, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 3, published in Richmond, VA, in 1883. pp. 79-81.


“Letter from Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant-General U.S.A., to General William H. Richardson, January 21, 1860.”

Maury wrote to Richardson on January 21, 1860, from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to tender his services to Virginia, his native state, in the event of war. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 105.


“Letter from Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant-General U.S.A., to Governor John Letcher, April 10, 1861.”

Maury wrote to the Governor on April 10, 1861, from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to tender his service to Virginia, his native state, in the event of war. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 107.


“Letter from Dabney H. Maury, Late Captain of U.S.A., to Governor John Letcher, July 19, 1861.”

Maury wrote to the Governor on July 19, 1861, to tender his services to the State or Confederate Governments. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 186.


“Letter from David Ross to Colonel Davies, Mentions James Maury, July 5, 1781.”

Ross wrote to Colonel Davies on July 5, 1781, from Point of Fork. James Maury reported that Lord Cornwallis agreed to passports for the safe transfer of tobacco to Charleston for the purpose of paying the debts contracted there by Virginia prisoners held by the British, but Cornwallis stipulates that the tobacco cannot come from the James or York Rivers. Ross believes that everything can be arranged, and wants to send a larger quantity. James Maury was presumably son of the Reverend James Maury. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 201.


Letter from David Ross to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Reports on Meeting with James Maury, May 5, 1781.

Ross wrote to Jefferson on May 5, 1781, from Point Fork. He reported that James Maury had just called upon him and told him the fate of his ship [the Alert, seized by British troops]. Ross indicates that Maury wants to go to Charleston with a flag of truce to resolve the issue but Ross recommends to the Governor that the issue be put before Sir Henry Clinton in New York. James Maury is presumably James Maury, Jr., son of the Reverend James Maury. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, in Richmond in 1881. pp. 87-88.


“Letter from David Ross to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Mentions James Maury, Includes a Letter from Maury, May 26, 1781.”

On May 26, 1781, Ross wrote to the Governor in Charlottesville, enclosing a letter from James Maury. Ross explains that Maury is ready to sail [for Charleston] and has £10,000 for his expenses. Maury is first going to Richmond for a few days per a letter from the Marquis [de Lafayette]. James Maury is presumably the son of the Reverend James Maury. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, for April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. p. 121.


“Letter from David Ross to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Mentions James Maury, Bearer of this Letter, May 28, 1781.”

Ross wrote to the Governor in Point of Fork on May 28, 1781. He provides details on arms being obtained in Philadelphia and explains that James Maury, the bearer of this letter, has more details. Ross also reports that Maury thinks there is a fair prospect of negotiating matters with Lord Cornwallis for sending tobacco to Charleston [to provide for Virginia prisoners of war to pay their debts there while held by the British]. Maury wants to go on the vessel with the flag of truce, on this business. James Maury was presumably son of the Reverend James Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 127.


“Letter from David Ross to Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr., Reports on Activity of James Maury, July 25, 1781.”

Ross wrote to the governor on July 25, 1781, from Richmond. He reported that about two weeks before, he had sent Mr. Maury to the Northern Tobacco Inspectors with orders for the tobacco for Charleston. Maury had recommended that all the county lieutenants “where there are publick Tobaccos” help his agents in moving it. Maury had also sent a receipt for £20,160, a little more than he had mentioned in his letter. James Maury was presumably son of the late Reverend James Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 251.


“Letter from Fielding Lewis to Colonel George Brooke, Treasurer of Virginia, Mentions James Maury, February 9, 1781.

Lewis wrote in this letter dated February 9, 1781, that he had advanced his own money to Mr. [Charles] Dick to keep the gun factory operating [in Fredericksburg]. He had lent the State a sum of £7,000 to establish the factory and now cannot afford to pay his own taxes. He asks that Brooke send him the money that the state owes him via Mr. James Maury, who has the warrant. This is presumably James Maury, Jr., son of the late Reverend James Maury. Included in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1652 - 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume I, published in Richmond, VA, in 1875. pp. 502-503.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury, Mayor, to Governor Henry Lee, September 17, 1793.”

Maury wrote to the Governor on September 17, 1793, from Fredericksburg. He reported that there was a danger of infectious fever in Fredericksburg brought by the many vessels coming there from Philadelphia. He asked the governor to take such steps as necessary to eliminate this threat by the improper conduct of the masters’ of the vessels. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. pp. 536-537.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor Henry Lee, September 22, 1793.”

Maury wrote on September 22, 1793, from Fredericksburg to thank the governor for his two letters of the 18th and states that it appears from letters from Philadelphia that the fever there is much less fatal than initially thought, but that he has no fully satisfactory information. He enclosed a copy of one such letter. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. p. 542.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor Henry Lee, October 6, 1793.”

Maury wrote to the Governor on October 6, 1793, from Fredericksburg, asking him to write to Benjamin Sykes of Norfolk with a certificate that he [Maury] was an American citizen. Maury was departing for Norfolk and needed the certificate [a passport] to board a vessel destined for Liverpool. In the letter he references an enclosed letter from Liverpool, but this enclosure has not been found. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. p. 582.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor Henry Lee, Enclosing Letter from Lawrence Muse, September 26, 1793.”

Maury wrote to Governor Lee from Fredericksburg on September 26, 1793, forwarding a September 23 letter from Lawrence Muse in Tappahannock. Muse wrote that a vessel commanded by John Jackson had arrived from Philadelphia, wanting to dock. Under the quarantine orders of the governor [because of the fever in Philadelphia], he was not allowed to dock. Jackson was outraged and said that he would land where ever he pleased. Muse wrote to Maury to inform him that Jackson had sailed and may try to dock in Fredericksburg. Published in Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from August 11, 1792, to December 31, 1793, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 6, published in Richmond, VA, in 1886. pp. 549-550.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor James Monroe, August 23, 1802.”

Maury wrote to the Governor on August 23, 1802, from New York City. He reported that three French ships of war had arrived there from Guadeloupe, where they had tried to sell or dispose of 1,500 renegade Negroes. The Spanish Government refused to allow them to be landed in Guadeloupe. Maury wrote to warn the Governor, as he indicated that it seemed likely that the French may try to sell or land them clandestinely along the Southern U.S. coast, and suggested that the Governor may want to take what steps may be necessary to “protect the peace and tranquillity of the State.” Maury further reported that many of the Negroes were ill. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1799, to December 31, 1807, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 9, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. pp. 317-318.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor James Wood, August 10, 1798.”

Maury wrote to Governor Wood from Fredericksburg on August 10, 1798, to recommend Dr. David C. Ker for appointment to whatever line he desires. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from May 16, 1795, to December 31, 1798; Embracing the Letters and Proceedings of the Committee of Correspondence and Inquiry of Virginia and the Other Colonies, from March 12, 1773, to April 7, 1775; also the Journal of the Committee of Safety of Virginia, from February 7, 1776, to July 5, 1776, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 8, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. p. 508.


“Letter from Fontaine Maury to Governor Robert Brooke, March 28, 1796.”

Maury wrote to the governor from Fredericksburg on March 28, 1796, enclosing a paper at the request of the town residents. The paper reports that some person appears to be determined to destroy the tobacco warehouses, so a guard had been in place every night since the initial attempt was made and would remain in place until the person is caught. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from May 16, 1795, to December 31, 1798; Embracing the Letters and Proceedings of the Committee of Correspondence and Inquiry of Virginia and the Other Colonies, from March 12, 1773, to April 7, 1775; also the Journal of the Committee of Safety of Virginia, from February 7, 1776, to July 5, 1776, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 8, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. p. 358.


“Letter from Frank Carn to William Wirt, Mentions Thomas W. Maury, January 19, 1802.”

Carn wrote on January 19, 1802, from Williamsburg, about information received in the town the previous day that an insurrection by Negroes was planned. He reported that a meeting was held in the town hall and decided to send out a patrol of six to raise the alarm. The townspeople were concerned, because they had no arms. This information came from overheard conversations between Negroes, plus one Negro told Thomas W. Maury in the street the previous evening that left no doubt that an insurrection was planned. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1799, to December 31, 1807, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 9, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. pp. 274-275.


“Letter from George Blacknall to Matthew Fontaine Maury, May 25, 1861.”

Blacknall wrote to Maury on May 25, 1861, from Norfolk, requesting aid in procuring the release of Lieutenant William H. Murdaugh, believed to be detained as a prisoner of war in New York. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 134.


“Letter from Governor John Letcher to the Convention of Virginia, Nominating Captain Matthew Fontaine Maury as a Member of the Council, April 21, 1861.”

The Governor wrote to the Convention from Richmond on April 21, 1861, nominating Captain Matthew Fontaine Maury as the third member of the council authorized by ordnance of the 20th. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 110.


“Letter from Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr., to Count de Grasse, Mentions James Maury, Deliverer of This Letter, October 5, 1781.”

The Governor wrote to the Count on October 5, 1781, from his camp before York. Nelson wrote that James Maury, the deliverer of the letter, was to wait to be informed of the circumstances of the detention of the flag vessels carrying tobacco to Charleston. Maury was empowered to purchase for the State any vessels captured under [French admiral] de Grasse’s command and asks for de Grasse’s assistance for Maury to transact this business. James Maury was presumably son of the Reverend James Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 525.


“Letter from Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr., to James Maury, Esq., ‘Agent of the Flag Vessels Bound to Charlestown,’ September 27, 1781.”

Governor Nelson wrote to Maury on September 27, 1781, from Williamsburg, instructing Maury that, based on the current situation in their affairs, it was improper for the vessels under his charge to proceed. He further instructed Maury to direct the vessels to return to their posts until further orders. James Maury was presumably son of the Reverend James Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, published in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 501.


“Letter from James Keith to Governor James Monroe, Mentions Arms Held by Fontaine Maury, November 13, 1801.”

Keith wrote to the Governor on November 13, 1801, from Alexandria, in which he included a list of the distribution of public arms. The arms for Spotsylvania (77 arms), Fredericksburg (140 arms), Stafford (72 arms), and Falmouth (37 arms) were held by Fontaine Maury in Fredericksburg, for members of the 16th and 45th Regiments. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1799, to December 31, 1807, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 9, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. pp. 218-219.


“Letter from James Monroe to Dr. Charles Everett, Mentioned Mr. Maury, November 13, 1823.”

Monroe wrote to Dr. Everett on November 13, 1823, from Washington. He asked Everett, who lived near Milton, Virginia, to join him while he was in office [as President]. Mr. Maury and Mr. Muston would copy his messages, so that all Everett would have to do was to deliver them to the Congress. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 5, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1923. pp. 21-22.


“Letter from John Clarke to Governor James Monroe, Mentions Arms in Possession of Fontaine Maury, undated letter.”

Clarke sent an undated letter to the Governor, seeking authorization of his plan to distribute public arms to several counties, so that people may safely obtain arms when needed for their respective regiments while saving money for the State. In Fredericksburg the arms would be in the possession of Fontaine Maury. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1799, to December 31, 1807, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 9, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. pp. 122-123.


“Letter from Jonathan Winston to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Mentions Lieutenant Colonel William Fontaine, January 24, 1781.”

Reprint of a January 24, 1781, letter from Jonathan Winston to Virginia Governor Thomas Jefferson about his being in command of the Hanover [previously listed “Henry” which is incorrect] County militia during the absence of Lieutenant Colonel William Fontaine [b. 1753, grandson of Rev. Peter Fontaine] and his dire need for ammunition. He asks Jefferson to arrange sending supplies. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, 1651-1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 1, in Richmond, VA, in 1853. p. 457.


Letter from Louisiana Hubard to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, August ? 1825.

She wrote in part that:


“Uncle Bolling [Leneaus Bolling] returned from Nelson last Friday evening and has succeeded in getting JW [John W Maury] to give up this estate and the Buffaloe and everything in Buckingham provided Mama [Susan Wilcox Hubard Maury] would pay half of the debt and half the thousand dollars. Mama thinks it a hardcase that she should have anything to pay but in my opinion it has turned out as well as could be expected.”....


John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker. Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


“Letter from Major Charles Dick to Governor Thomas Jefferson, Asked For Money for Small Arms Factory, to Provide to Captain Abraham Maury, April 21, 1781.”

Major Dick wrote to the Governor on April 21, 1781, from Fredericksburg. He cites that he had written three weeks earlier about the need for money to operate the small arms factory but had heard nothing in reply. He asked Jefferson to provide £100,000 to Captain Abraham Maury, who waited for Jefferson’s reply. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, in Richmond, VA, in 1881. p. 62.


“Letter from Nathaniel Nelson to the Honorable David Jameson, Regarding Horse Taken by Colonel William Fontaine, December 2, 1781.”

Reprint of a December 2, 1781, letter from Nathaniel Nelson to David Jameson, applying for written authorization to recover a horse taken by Colonel [William] Fontaine for service when there was a great demand for wagons and saddle horses. Written in Hanover County, Virginia. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, in Richmond, VA, in 1881. p. 634.


Letter from Philip Ludwell to the Bishop of London about Rev. James Fontaine, July 10, 1716.”

In a letter from Philip Ludwell to the Bishop of London written in Virginia on July 10, 1716, he mentions Mr. John Fontaine [meaning Rev. James Fontaine] who teaches a private academy in Dublin and has been recommended. Ludwell wrote that he had written to Fontaine, suggesting that he apply to the Bishop for a position in the office of the governors of William and Mary. The article further notes, in a footnote, that Fontaine did not come to Virginia, and Rev. Hugh Jones was made professor of mathematics. “Unpublished Letters at Fullham, in the Library of the Bishop of London,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1901. p. 219.


Letter from Reverend James Maury to Philip Ludwell, on Defence of Virginia Frontiers, February 10, 1756.

This long letter was from the Reverend James Maury, written in Louisa County, Virginia, on February 10, 1756, to Philip Ludwell. It is fully transcribed in this article. A footnote explains that Rev. Maury was minister of Fredericksville parish in Louisa County from 1754 until his death in 1770. It states that he was “an energetic man of high character and scholarly attainments, and was one of the most prominent of the colonial clergy of his time. He is now best-known as the plaintiff in the suit in Hanover, under the “Two-penny Act,” in which Patrick Henry first attained public note. He was ancestor of Matthew F. [Fontaine] Maury. Philip Ludwell, to whom the letter was written, was a member of the Council. The expedition under Major Andrew Lewis, referred to, was what was known as the ‘Shawnee Expedition,’ and as Mr. Maury suspected would be the case, it had little effect. At the session of March, 1756, the Virginia Assembly directed the building of a chain of forts. . . .” “Letter of Rev. James to Philip Ludwell, on the Defence of the Frontiers of Virginia, 1756,” was contributed by Worthington Chauncey Ford and published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1911. pp. 292-304.


“Letter from the Right Honourable Botetourt to Mr. Norton, Merchant, London, Mentions Rev. Matthew Maury, January 6, 1770.”

Botetourt wrote to Mr. Norton on January 6, 1770, from Williamsburg. He thanked Norton for his letter of December 8 (1769) and assured him that the Reverend Matthew Maury [son of the Reverend James Maury] stands in good favor with friends in England and in Virginia. He cites that Maury had dined with him the previous Sunday after his arrival and then preached in the afternoon to the great satisfaction of his audience. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 7, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1925. p. 95.


Letter from Robert Thurston Hubard to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, July 24, 1824.

Robert Hubard sent this letter from Saratoga and read in part:


“Uncle Bolling [Lenaus Bolling] has (misabile die ter) at last started to Nelson to see JW [John W Maury]. He went last Friday and I expect will return about the last of the week”


John Maury (born 1789) was married to Susan Hubard. He was a son of the Reverend Matthew Maury (1744-1808) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Simms Walker.

Letter in the Hubard Family Papers, 1741-1907, Manuscripts Department, Southern Historical Collection, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, collection #360. Courtesy of Page Nichols.


“Letter from S. T. Abort to Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury, April 27, 1861.”

Abort wrote to Maury on April 27, 1861, from Washington, D.C., to solicit an appointment as an engineer. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 117.


Letter from Sarah Fontaine Floyd to Isaac Shelby, May 31, 1851.

Sarah Floyd [wife of George Rogers Clark Floyd] wrote to her nephew from Jeffersonville on May 31, 1851, asking that he send her a feather bed. The text of the letter reads:


“My dear Isaac

You will perhaps be somewhat astonished at the reception of a letter from one whom you have doubtless thought dead—or whom perhaps you have never thought of at all—but your old aunt is still in the land of the living, although weak, feeble and very poor,--I am living across the river from Louisville in a little town in very reduced circumstances, my daughter and her three children are living with me. You have doubtless heard of our misfortunes—they have been many and very sad, but hope with the help of the Almighty God to forget the past and to struggle along with our difficulties with an undaunted spirit and at last taken at his will to call me hense. I shall be prepared. Your grandfather came over with Sister Pope a few days since to see me—he told me to write you to send me one of his feather beds and as I have only one. I am extremely thankful to him for it, and would greatly oblige me dear Isaac by sending it down on Louisville to the care of Dr. Way. This is perhaps asking a great deal of you my dear relative but I feel that you will not refuse. Give my love to your father, Mary and Elizabeth, and accept for yourself the same affection of your old aunt.

Sarah F. Floyd.”


This letter is contained in the Shelby Family Papers, 1850-1853, Folder 16, in the University of Kentucky Manuscript Collection, Call Number 54W3, in Louisville, Kentucky.


“Letter from William Barksdale to Colonel William Fontaine, December 1, 1789.”

Reprint of a letter written on December 1, 1789, in Petersburg from Barksdale to Fontaine, explaining the cruel treatment of a convicted slave named Robin who was chained to a wall standing up in a cold cell. In October this slave, property of Humphrey Traylor, was convicted of stabbing Bottom Steagall of Brunswick County and stealing his gun. Some of the jurors asked for leniency. Barksdale wrote of the dismal conditions in which Robin was kept and reported that he was to be released with suspension, pending the payment of a fine by Traylor, but Steagall swears he will kill Robin upon his release. Barksdale wrote Fontaine that something decisive must be done or Robin would be dead from cold and maltreatment before the date of his release. Published by William P. Palmer and Sherwin McRae, Arrangers and Editors of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from July 2, 1790, to August 10, 1792, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 5, in Richmond, VA, in 1885. pp. 49-50.


“Letter from Colonel William Fontaine to ______, October 26, 1781.”

Reprint of a letter written by Colonel William Fontaine on October 26, 1781, in which he provides a detailed account of the surrender of the British at Yorktown. Mentions that he is going to Europe as soon as he can arrange passage, and will likely need to go by way of the West Indies. Sends his love to his sisters Sarah and Mary and their families. He mentions enclosing two yards of ribbon for each of them and for little Bess, if Mary was absent. Unknown to whom it was written. Published by William P. Palmer, Arranger and Editor of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from April 1, 1781, to December 31, 1781, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 2, in Richmond, VA, in 1881. pp. 567-569.


“Letter from Willis Wilson to the Governor, Mentions Mr. Maury, April 10, 1784.”

Wilson wrote to the Governor on April 10, 1784, from Portsmouth. He reported that a brigantine owned by Mr. Fitzsimons of Congress and commanded by Mr. [James] Maury had dropped down from Portsmouth to Hampton Roads in order to go to Jamaica, an open violation of the embargo and in defiance of repeated orders by officers of the Customs house. Wilson sent a militia of 30 men in a schooner after him and seized him in Hampton Roads, bringing the ship back. Wilson indicated that he would try to make this violator pay the expense. Published in Sherwin McRae and Raleigh Colston’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1794, to May 16, 1795, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 7, published in Richmond, VA, in 1888. p. 105.


“Letters of the Byrd Family, Mentions Death of Reverend Peter Fontaine, August 16, 1759.”

In a letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Carter Byrd to Colonel William Byrd, dated August 16, 1759, she states in part that “our poor old good Minister [Peter] Fontaine has left this Staige [sic]. He died not one Shiling [sic] in debt as people say.” Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 37, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in July 1929. p. 248.


Letter to Mr. Walker Maury in Norfolk from William (?) Lee, February 7, 1787.

William (?) Lee wrote from Green Spring on February 7, 1787, to Mr. Walker Maury in Norfolk, saying that he regretted that he did not know that Maury had intended to leave Williamsburg, as he had sent for his son’s bed and bedding but his servants had been unable to obtain only two blankets and a quilt. Cited Lee Letter Book V, p. 358. Taken from a continuation article, “Some Notes on ‘Green Spring’ Formerly the Home of Sir William Berkeley, Ludwells and Lees,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 38, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1930. p. 50.


Letters of Dabney Herndon Maury, 1862-1863.

These two letters are in the Archival Manuscript Materials Collection, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., purchased in 1909.


“Letters to the Byrd Family – Mention of Peter Fontaine, Chaplain to the Virginia Commission, July 1728.”

In a letter from Colonel William Byrd to Colonel Bladen, written in July 1728, Colonel Byrd states that he hopes that a bounty will be extended to the Virginia Commission’s Chaplain, Mr. Peter Fountain [Fontaine]. The Commission surveyed the borders between North Carolina and Virginia. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 36, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1928. p. 115.


Lieutenant Abraham Maury, Original Member of the Virginia Chapter of the Society of the Cincinnati.

Lieutenant Abraham Maury appears on a list of the original members of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Virginia, taken from the list in the possession of the Secretary-General and the original minute-book of the Society. Compiled by John Cropper, Esq., “Virginia Society of the Cincinnati,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 6, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1898. p. 26.


Lieutenant Maury’s Investigations of the Winds and Currents of the Sea.

Lieutenant William Fontaine Maury, Author. Published by authority of the Honorable William A. Graham, Secretary of the Navy, and of Commodore Lewis Warrington, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, of the U.S. National Observatory. Originally published in the appendix of the Washington astronomical observations for 1846. Published in Washington, D.C., by C. Alexander, Printer, in February 1851. 126 pages.


Life and Letters of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Jaquelin Ambler Caskie, Author. Published in Richmond, VA, by the Richmond Press, Inc., in 1928. 191 pages.


“Lightfoot Family – William Lightfoot Married Catherine Maury of Albemarle County.”

Mentions that William Lightfoot married Catherine Maury of Albemarle County. The article extracted this information from Rev. Philip Slaughter’s books, Memoirs of Colonel Joshua Fry and History of St. Mark’s Parish. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 2, No. 1, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in July 1893. p. 205.


“Lighthouse of the Skies: The U.S. Naval Observatory Has Blazed a Path Between Sea and Sky Since Its Birth in the Mid-19th Century.”

An article by Geoff Chester on the U.S. Naval Observatory that includes several paragraphs on the role of Matthew Fontaine Maury in its history. Published in Astronomy magazine, Volume 35, Number 8, in August 2007, pp. 58-63. Maury is mentioned on page 60-61.


“List of Assistant Surgeons Attached to the Provisional Army of Virginia, Includes T. F. Maury.”

In these Civil War records, John B. Fontaine of Louisa County, Virginia, is listed in the Cavalry at Manassas. T. F. Maury of Caroline County, Virginia, is listed in the 1st Regiment of Virginia Volunteers at Manassas. Included in H. W. Flournoy’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume XI, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 141.


“List of Dabney Carr’s Library, Includes ‘Tales of a Huguenot Family’ by Jaques Fontaine.”

Article about Dabney Carr (1743-1773) of Louisa County, Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses and was a brother-in-law of Thomas Jefferson. On a list of books in his library was Tales of a Huguenot Family by Jean de la Fontaine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 2, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1894. p. 226.


List of French and Swiss Who Settled in Charleston, on the Santee, and at the Orange Quarter in Carolina.

Daniel Ravenel, Author. This 2012 reprint of the 1888 edition that documents one of the earliest lists of Huguenot emigrants to South Carolina and details on their lives in South Carolina. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“List of Men in the 14th Brigade Artillery, Includes Carter B. Fontaine, August 20, 1794.”

This list includes the names of fifty men in this brigade on August 20, 1794. It includes Carter B. Fontaine. Published by William P. Palmer and Sherwin McRae, Arrangers and Editors of the Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1794, to May 16, 1795, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 7, in Richmond, VA, in 1888. p. 271.


“A List of Parishes, and the Ministers in Them – Includes Matthew Maury, James Maury Fontaine, 1774.”

Based on Purdie & Dixon’s Virginia almanac for 1774, Matthew Maury was minister in Frederickville Parish, Ablemarle County, and James M[aury] Fontaine was minister in Ware Parish, Gloucester County. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1897. pp. 200, 201.


The Liturgy, or Forms of Divine Service, of the French Protestant Church of Charleston, South Carolina: Translated from the Liturgy of the Churches of Neufchatel and Vallangin.

1737 and 1772 Editions. 5th Edition. Charleston, S.C.: The Ravenel Family. 1988.


“A Lost Opportunity, a Tribute to Matthew Fontaine Maury, Includes a Letter from Maury in Mexico, February 23, 1866.”

A tribute to Matthew Fontaine Maury. It includes the transcript of a letter that Maury wrote from Mexico on February 23, 1866. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 21, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1939. pp. 1-5.


Louis XIII: The Making of a King.

Elizabeth Wirth Marvick, Author. History of Louis XIII’s life and reign and impact on 16th century France. Includes bibliography and index. New Haven: Yale University Press. 1986. 278 pages.


Madame Catherine.

Irene Mahoney, Author. A biography of Catherine de Médicis, Queen and consort of Henry II, King of France, 1519-1589. Includes bibliography and index. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, Inc. 1975. 381 pages.


“Major Robert Beverley and His Descendants – Includes Excerpts from John Fontaine’s Journal.”

W. G. Stanard, Author. In this article there are excerpts from the diary of John Fontaine, preserved in Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, which give an account of his visit to Robert Beverley’s house, Beverley Park, in 1715. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1895. pp. 171-172.


The Manakin Experiment: A French Protestant Colony in the New World.

Robert L. Crewdson, Author. Published in the Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, LX, #1. March 1986, 203-12.


Manual of Geography: A Complete Treatise on Mathematical, Civil, and Physical, Geography.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Published in New York and Baltimore by the University Publishing Co. in 1870. 162 pages. Other editions of this textbook are known to have been published in 1880, 1887, 1892, 1895, and 1899.


Map Showing the Economic Minerals Along the Route of the Chesapeake & Ohio Rail Way to Accompany the Geological Report of Thomas S. Ridgway.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Cartographer. Map covers area from Richmond, VA, to the Ohio River along the route of the railroad and shows the geological sections in which minerals are found. Consolidated from the Virginia Central and Covington and Ohio Railroads in August 1868. Published in 1872. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


“The March of the First Regiment of Artillery 1778 – Mentions Mildred Thornton, Wife of Colonel Abraham Maury.”

Author of this paper is unknown and it had only partially survived. It mentions Mrs. Anne Thornton, daughter of the Reverend John Thompson and his wife, Butler Brayne, widow of Governor Alexander Spotswood. Mrs. Thornton’s daughters are mentioned, including Mildred Thornton, who married Colonel Abraham Maury of Madison County, Virginia. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 14, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1932. p. 15.


Marriage of George C. Armistead and Alice Virginia Fontaine, Daughter of Carter Fontaine, 1831.

A marriage notice for George C. Armistead of Alabama and Alice Virginia Fontaine, youngest daughter of the late Carter Fontaine of Prince William County, Virginia, were married in Aldie, in Loudoun County, Virginia, on November 7, 1831, by the Reverend Mr. Cutter. Notice published in the November 12, 1831, issue of The National Intelligencer. Notice included in book by George A. Martin and Frank J. Metcalf, Marriage and Death Notices from The National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.) 1800-1850, published in Washington, D.C., by the National Genealogical Society, in 1976 in NGS Special Publication No. 41, p. 571.


“Marriage Bond for James Maury Fontaine and Betty Carter Churchill in Middlesex County, December 31, 1777.”

James Maury Fontaine and Betty Carter Churchill, December 31, 1777. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 7, No. 3, published in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1899. p. 193.


Marriage Bond for Metcalfe De Graffenreidt and Mary Ann Maury, Daughter of Abraham Maury, 1783.

June 1783, Metcalfe De Graffenreidt and Mary Ann Maury marriage bond, includes a letter of consent from Abraham Maury for his daughter Mary Ann. “Marriage Bonds in Lunenburg Court-House,” compiled by Lyon G. Tyler, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1901. p. 176.


Marriage of Aaron Fontaine, Barbara Terrell, Their Births and Those of Their 12 Children.

Lists the birth of Mrs. Barbara Tyrel Mrs. Fountain as Sept. 3, 1756, the birth of her husband Aaron Fountaine on Nov. 30, 1756, and their marriage date of May 19, 1772, along with the register of births for their twelve children: (1) Peter Fontaine (b. 1774); (2) James Tyrel Fontaine (b. 1776); (3) Mary Ann Fontaine (b. 1778); (4) Elizabeth Fontaine (b. 1780); (5) Matilda Fontaine (b. 1782); (6) Patsie Minor Fontaine (b. 1785); (7) Sallie Sarah Fontaine (b. 1787); (8) Moriah Fontaine (b. 1789); (9) America Fontaine (b. 1791); (10) Will Maury Fontaine (b. 1793); (11) Barbara Ker Fontaine (b. 1794); and (12) Ann Overton Fontaine (b. 1796). Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 254.


Marriage Record of Fortunatus Cosby and Mary Anne Fontaine in Louisa, November 1795.

In the Marriages section is listed the November 1, 1795, marriage of Fortunatus Cosby and Mary Anne Fontaine, in Louisa. “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1906. p. 34.


Martha Bickerton Greenhow, Granddaughter of John Greenhow (1724-1787), Married Robert H. Maury.

In the end-notes of this article is included genealogical information on different individuals. It includes several paragraphs on the John Greenhow family. A granddaughter of this John Greenhow (1724-1787), Martha Bickerton Greenhow, married Robert H. Maury. Martha was the daughter of George Greenhow and his wife Elizabeth Ambler Lewis. “Old Virginia Editors,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 7, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1898. p. 17.


Martha Waller Christened by the Reverend Francis Fontaine, Sunday, December 6, 1747.

Benjamin Waller (b. 1716) and Martha Hall (b. 1728) had a daughter, born Saturday, November 28, 1747, and was christened on Sunday, December 6, 1747, by the Reverend Mr. [Francis] Fontaine, by the name Martha. She later married William Tayloe in March 1767. “Records of the Waller Family,” contributed by Robert Page Waller of Norfolk, Va., from a copy of Benjamin Waller’s Bible, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1905. p. 175.


“Mary Fontaine, Granddaughter of Reverend Peter Fontaine, Wife of Bowles Armistead.”

Query by Eliza S. Washington of Charles Town, Jefferson County, West Virginia. She cites Mary Fontaine, granddaughter of Rev. Peter Fontaine, emigrant, and wife of Bowles Armistead. She was seeking the parents of Bowles Armistead. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1896. p. 329.


“Mary Fontaine Married George W. Hardwick; Warren County, Georgia, 1810.”

Mary Fontaine and George W. Hardwick are listed as married on 27 June 1810 in Warren County, Georgia. Mary Fontaine was the daughter of Thomas Fontaine (1752-1808) and his first wife, believed to be Clarissa Bruton. This entry appears in the Reverend Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., book, Some Georgia County Records, Volume I, published in Easley, South Carolina, by Southern Historical Press in 1977.


“Mary Fontaine Married John McCoy; Warren County, Georgia, 1797.”

Mary Fontaine and John McCoy are listed as married on 15 April 1797 in Warren County, Georgia. This appears on p. 43 of Frances T. Ingmire’s Colonial Georgia Marriage Records from 1760-1810, self-published by the author in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1985.


Mary Goode Thornton Married Twice, First with Lt. Alex. C. Maury.

Mary Goode Thornton, born 1813, married first with Lieutenant Alex. C. Maury, U.S. Navy, and then with Rev. J. Jackson Scott of Pensacola. She was one of four children of George Washington Thornton and his wife Mary Randolph. Included in a continuation article by W. G. Stanard, “The Thornton Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1898. p. 239.


Mary Grymes, Wife of the Reverend Walker Maury.

In the “Historical and Genealogical Notes” section, the magazine queried readers about the parentage of Mary Grymes, the wife of Rev. Walker Maury. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1896. p. 280.


Mary M. Fontaine Married Major Thomas L. Broun in Richmond, June 10, 1866.

Alfred Huger wrote a letter from Charleston dated June 10, 1866, to Major Thomas L. Broun of Richmond, VA. His letter, transcribed in the article, was a reply to an invitation sent to him to attend the marriage of the major with Miss Mary M. Fontaine in St. James Church in Richmond on June 7, 1866. “Letters from Alfred Huger, Edward McCrady and Dr. William H. Huger, of South Carolina,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 20, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1911. p. 64.


Mary Minor Married Joseph Herndon, Son Dabney Married Elizabeth Hall, Their Daughter Ann Herndon Was the Mother of Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Mary Minor, the fourth child of John Minor, married Joseph Herndon, and they had children, the first born in 1766. One of these children was Dabney Herndon, who married Elizabeth Hall, and had a daughter, Ann Herndon, who married Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury. It cites the book The Meriwethers and Minors.” Continuation of an article, “The Minor Family,” with corrections, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1901. p. 180.


Mary Prather, daughter of Thomas Prather and Miss Fontaine of Louisville, KY, Married Worden Pope Churchill (1804-1830).

Worden Pope Churchill (1804-1830) married Mary Prather, daughter of Thomas Prather and his wife, Miss Fontaine, of Louisville, Kentucky. They had one son, Worden Pope Churchill, who married young, was soon left a widower, and was living in 1900 without issue. “Armistead Churchill, the Fifth Son, and Probably the Sixth Child, of Armistead Churchill and Hannah Harrison, and His Descendants,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1901. p. 248.


Master Index to The Huguenot: The Biennial Publications of the Huguenot Society, Founders of Manakin in the Colony of Virginia and Index to Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia 1707-1750.

Langston James Gorree and Janice Curtis Pampell, Editors. Bryan, TX: Family History Foundation. 1986.


Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Charles Alphonso Smith, Author. Reprinted from the alumni bulletin of the University of Virginia, January 1924. 10 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Matthew Fontaine Maury Association Report, 1917.

This article lists the officers and advisory board of the newly created Matthew Fontaine Maury Association, citing that it was organized on May 11, 1915, to honor Maury. The association was working to have Maury added to the Hall of Fame in New York City; request the State Board of Education to appoint Maury’s birthday, January 14, as Maury Day in schools, which approved this request in July 1916; and to pursue adding a bronze statue of Maury in Richmond. The article closes by soliciting support and membership, which was $1 per year or $10 for a lifetime membership. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 25, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1917. pp. 405-406.


Matthew Fontaine Maury & Joseph Henry, Scientists of the Civil War.

Patricia Jahns, Author. Published in New York by Hastings House in 1961. 308 pages.


Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1806-1873, Pathfinder of the Seas; the Development of Oceanography.

Columbus O'Donnell Iselin, Author. Published in New York by the Newcomen Society in North America in 1957. 28 pages.


New! Matthew Fontaine Maury, Father of Oceanography: A Biography 1806-1873.

John Grady, Author. This is the newest biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury and includes details on his life growing up in Tennessee. Published in 2015 in Jefferson, North Carolina, by McFarland & Co., 354 pages that includes a bibliography and index.


Matthew Fontaine Maury Listed as One of Three Great Virginia Scientific Inventors.

In a book review of George M. Beltzhoover Jr.’s book, James Rumsey, the Inventor of the Steamboat (published by The West Virginia Historical and Antiquarian Society), it mentions James Rumsey as one of three great Virginia scientific inventors. The others cited are Leander J. McCormick, inventor of the reaper, and Matthew F. [Fontaine] Maury, who charted the winds and currents of the seas. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1900. p. 137.


Matthew Fontaine Maury: The Pathfinder of the Seas.

Charles Lee Lewis, Author. Published in 1927 in Annapolis, MD, by the United States Naval Institute. Reprinted in 1980. 92 pages.


“Matthew Fontaine Maury, Pathfinder of the Seas.”

This 74 page book was written by Howard J. Cohen of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (now renamed National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency), a U.S. Department of Defense agency responsible for managing and providing imagery and geospatial information for diverse military, civil, and international needs. The book includes a summary of tributes to Maury, including photographs of Maury, buildings, ships, and places that carry Maury’s name, and provides a brief bibliography. A first edition was published in 2003, this more comprehensive version was published in 2006 by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, Bethesda, Maryland.


Matthew Fontaine Maury, Scientist of the Sea.

Frances Leigh Williams, Author. A definitive biography of Maury. Includes a bibliography of the published works of Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in New Brunswick by Rutgers University Press in 1963. 720 pages, including charts and a full bibliography.


Matthew Fontaine Maury, Trail Maker of the Seas

Hildegarde Hawthorne, Author. Published in 1943 in New York by Longmans, Green and Co. 226 pages.


Matthew Maury Land Petition Along Pidgeon River, December 23, 1768.

On December 23, 1768, Matthew Maury appears on a list of petitions for patents and grants issued. It reads “Matthew Maury and 51 others, for 52,000 acres above the mouth of Pidgeon River.” List compiled under an order issued November 29, 1769, by the House of Burgesses for “List of Early Land Patents and Grants Petitioned for in Virginia up to 1769, preserved among the Washington Papers,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1898. p. 243.


“Maury Association.”

This announcement from the Maury Association cites Matthew Fontaine Maury as a great scientist and that Virginia had made his birthday a public holiday. The Association wanted to erect a monument to him in Richmond, and provided details in this announcement on how people could make contributions. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 5, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1923. pp. 70-71.


“Maury Bible Records.”

A letter by Joseph Leidy of Philadelphia, dated October 14, 1918, provides details from the Bible of James Maury (1746-1840), first American Consul to Liverpool, who was son of Rev. James Maury, defendant of the “Parson’s Cause” in 1765. The letter includes information from the Bible on his parents, his maternal grandparents, James Walker and Ann Hill, and all of his siblings. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 27, Nos. 3 & 4, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in July and October 1918. pp. 375-376.


Maury Family from Virginia in Northern Alabama.

The Maury family is mentioned as one of the early settlers to northern Alabama who had Virginia origins, as mentioned in a book review of Early Settlers of Alabama by Col. James Edmonds Saunders of Lawrence County, Al, with notes and genealogies by his granddaughter Elizabeth Saunders Blair Stubbs (published in New Orleans, 1899). The review was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 7, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1900. p. 446.


The Maury Family Tree: Descendants of Mary Anne Fontaine (1690-1755) and Matthew Maury (1686-1762) and Others.

Sue Crabtree West-Teague, Author. Includes coats-of-arm for both the Fontaine and Maury families. Self-published in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1979, 1983, and 205. 572 pages, indexed.


Maury Family Papers, ca 1770 to 1915.

Private and business correspondence of the Albemarle County, Virginia, Maury family, primarily of James Maury. There are about 600 items covering the period from around 1770 to 1915. Most of materials are on business matters but include family details and information on family slaves. Available in Acc. 3888 in the University of Virginia Library’s Manuscripts Division in the Special Collections Department.


“Maury Had Army in the Field at Time of General Robert E. Lee’s Surrender, 1865.”

In an article by Dr. Lyon Gardiner Tyler, he mentions that Maury still had an army in the field in Virginia at the time of General Lee’s surrender [this is presumably Dabney Herndon Maury]. An article “Jefferson Davis,” by Dr. Lyon Gardiner Tyler, published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 17, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1936. p. 206.


Maury Maverick, a Political Biography.

Richard B. Henderson, Author. Biography of Fontaine and Maury descendant Maury Maverick, an attorney, U.S. Congressman in the 1930s from Texas, and mayor of San Antonio. He is famous for coining the phrase “gobbledygook” for bureaucratic language. Published in Austin, Texas, by University of Texas Press. 1970. 356 pages.


“Maury-Moore-Grymes-Dawson.”

Rev. James Maury was the father of Rev. Walker Maury, who married Mary Grymes, daughter of Ludwell and Mary Dawson Grymes. This article provides proof that Mary Grymes was the daughter of Ludwell Grymes and not Benjamin Grymes, as frequently cited. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1897. pp. 208-209.


“Maury on Longstreet.”

This is a reprint of a letter written by General Dabney H. Maury on July 11, 1893, from Richmond, that was originally published in The New Orleans Times-Democrat. It was contributed by William Buckner McGroarty for publication in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 18, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1936. p. 5.


Maury-Simonds Physical Geography.

Frederic William Simonds and Matthew Fontaine Maury, Authors. A textbook on physical geography. Published in New York, Cincinnati, etc., by the American Book Co. in 1870. 347 pages.


Maury’s Physical Geography.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Outlines and syllabi on physical geography. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. in 1882. 26 pages.


“Maury’s Sailing Directions.”

Review of Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury’s book reprinted from the August 13, 1853, issue of The Examiner. Published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser, Volume 6, Number 4, in Richmond, VA, by MacFarlane & Fergusson, 1853. pp. 231-232.


Maury’s School in Albemarle County, Virginia, Early 1800s.

In a brief biography of George E. Harrison (b. 1797), it cites that George was sent to the school of John Wyle of Frederick, where he remained for several years. When that school was discontinued, he moved to the school of Mr. Maury of Albemarle County, where he remained until he went to John Wood for preparation for college. Part of a continuation article “Harrison of James River,” in a section called “Sketch of our Grandfather, George E. Harrison, as Written by His Sister, Mrs. Taylor, and Copied by George,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 36, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1928. p. 391.


Maury’s Wind and Current Charts: Gales in the Atlantic.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Charts of wind and ocean currents. Published by the U.S. Naval Observatory in 1857. 24 maps.


May 1783 Letter by Benjamin Harrison Mentions a ‘Mr. Maurie.’

On May 31, 1783, Benjamin Harrison wrote a letter to the Virginia Council, informing them of a mutiny in Baylor’s Regiment. He mentions in the letter than he has enclosed a letter that he asks be forwarded to “Mr. Maurie.” “Selections from the Campbell Papers,” within the Virginia Historical Society Collection, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 9, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1901. p. 73.


Memoir Concerning the French Settlements and French Settlers in the Colony of Rhode Island.

Elisha R. Potter, Author. This 1996 reprint of the 1879 edition lists information on fifteen “Frenchtown” plantation families. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Memorial Windows in the Washington Cathedral to Lieutenant Matthew Fontaine Maury, U.S.N., the Honorable Myron T. Herrick, and James Parmelee, Esq.

Privately published in 1940 in Washington, D.C. 18 pages.


Memorials of Huguenots in America.

Ammon Stapleton. This 2005 reprint of the 1901 edition documents the role of the Huguenots in the Palatine exodus to Pennsylvania with information on about 1,000 Huguenot refugees. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Mémoires d’une famillle huguenote, victime de la Révocation de l’Edit de Nantes.

Jacques Fontaine, Author, Bernard Cottret, Editor. Interpretation of Jaques de la Fontaine’s memoirs and history of the Fontaine and Maury families. Published in Montpellier, France, by Max Chaleil, Presses du Languedoc, in 1992. 269 pages, plus bibliography.


“Memoirs of a Huguenot Family.”

Book review of Ann Maury’s translation and compilation of Rev. Jacques Fontaine’s memoirs. Mentions Rev. James (Jacques) Fontaine and several of his family members - - John Fontaine’s diary, letters of Reverend Peter Fontaine of Westover, and Reverend James Maury of Fredericksburg Parish in Louisa County. Article published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser, Volume 4, Number 1, in Richmond, VA, by MacFarlane & Fergusson, Printers, in 1853. p. 48.


Memoirs of the Reverend Jaques Fontaine 1658-1728.

Dianne W. Ressinger, Editor. Ressinger prepared, edited, and annotated this complete English text of Jaques Fontaine’s memoirs. Published by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, New Series No. 2, in London in 1992.


Mention of Matthew Fontaine Maury’s Burial Place, Brief Biography.

Commodore [Matthew Fontaine] Maury is mentioned in a book review of Dora C. Jett’s book, Minor Sketches of Major Folk and Where They Sleep. The Old Masonic Burying Ground, Fredericksburg, Va (Richmond: Old Dominion Press. 1928). The review credits Ms. Jett with creating almost a biographical dictionary of Fredericksburg “worthies.” The review was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 36, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1928. p. 400.


Mention of Matthew Fontaine Maury’s Contribution to the Development of Commerce.

In the introduction of this article about Peter Francisco, it mentions many historical and scientific developments, including the development of commerce by men like [Matthew Fontaine] Maury and Morse. “Peter Francisco, The American Soldier,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1905. p. 213.


Mildred Washington Thornton Married Colonel Abraham Maury of Madison Co., VA.

Mildred Washington Thornton married Colonel Abraham Maury of Madison County, Virginia. She was the daughter of Francis Thornton of “Fall Hill” in Spotsylvania County and his wife Ann Thompson. In Francis’ will dated February 13, 1794, and proved in Spotsylvania Co. on April 8, 1795, he left his personal property and 200 acres to his wife for use in her life, other land to his son Francis where he lived, and the reversion of the estate left to his wife to his daughters Elizabeth Gregory Thornton, Mary Thornton, and Dorothea Thornton £500 each in specie, to daughter Frances Buckner a mourning ring, and to daughter Mildred Washington Maury £100 in specie. Included in a continuation article by W. G. Stanard, “The Thornton Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1896. p. 59.


Militia Pay Stubs – Colonel Abraham Maury Received Pay, September 1758.”

In September 1758 in Halifax County, Virginia, Colonel Abraham Maury received £42.1.0 for pay to Lieutenant Thomas Green and a company of militia under Green’s command, and £414.11.4 for pay to Captain James Dillard and a company of militia under Dillard’s command. Published in William Waller Hening’s The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws fo Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619, Volume 1, in New York by R. & W. & G. Bartow in 1823. pp. 218, 219.


“Mills Family – William Mills and Elizabeth Fontaine Had a Son, George Mills, April 11, 1782.”

According to miscellaneous records in the Douglas registers, William Mills and Elizabeth Fontaine had a son, George Mills, born on April 11, 1782. An article, “Mills,” by Mrs. P. W. Hiden of Newport News, Virginia, published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 15, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1933. p. 63.


Minor and Maury Connections.

This article mentions that Major Minor’s daughter, Diana Minor, married Richard Maury and was the mother of Commodore Matthew F. [Fontaine] Maury and the grandmother of General Dabney H. Maury. The article, by Charles M. Blackford of Lynchburg, Va., “Four Successive John Minors,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1902. p. 204.


Minor Doodes; His Descendant, Col. Richard Lancelot Maury.

In a clarification about two early settlers in Virginia, Minor Doodes and Doodes Minor, both men were naturalized in October 1675. The article’s author explained that Minor Doodes was not a member of the Minor family. He cites some early documents in the possession of one of Doodes’ descendants, Col. R. L. [Richard Lancelot] Maury, as evidence. Article by B. B. Minor, “Some Minors in Virginia,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1900. p. 249.


The Minor Family of Virginia.

John B. Minor, Author. Documents the descendants of Doodes Minor. Also includes information on the Coleman, Dabney, Holladay, Lewis, Maury, Meriwether, Quarles, and Trice families. Published in 1923 by the author. Indexed. 63 pages. Available from the National Genealogical Society library in St. Louis, MO, via interlibrary loan.


“Minutes of the Consistory of the French Church of London, Threadneedle Street, 1679-1692: Calendared with an Historical Introduction and Commentary.”

Article by Dr. Robin D. Gwynn in the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland Quarto Series, Volume LVIII, 25, published in 1994 in London by the Huguenot Society, in Threadneedle Street and French Protestant Refugees, c. 1660-1700, CD of the Huguenot Society Quarto Series, Volumes XXI, XLIX, and LVIII, in 2004 in London by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Mississippi and Pacific Railroad.

Matthew Fontaine Maury and John T. Trezevant, Authors. Early Pacific railroad projects. Published in Memphis by Twyman & Tannehill, Printers, in 1849. 24 pages.


Mississippi Home Places: Notes on Literature and History.

Elmo Howell, Author. Discusses Edward Fontaine and his son Charles Fontaine of Pontotoc, Mississippi. Self-published in Memphis in 1988. 266 pages, includes bibliography.


Mollie Fontaine Married William Wood Taylor; One Daughter, Virginia Wood.

Lists that William Wood Taylor had married Mollie Fontaine and they had one child, Virginia. This information comes from a Wood Genealogy, compiled by William S. Wood and published in Worcester, MA, in 1885 and added to by Miss Annebel Moore of Brownsville, TN. These Woods descend from Jane Proudfit, who married Jonathan Wood. Continuation article, “The Roane Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 18, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1910. p. 270.


Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error.

Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Author. Translated by Barbara Bray, the original title is Montaillou, village occitan de 1294 B 1324. The book is a history of the village of Montaillou and the surrounding mountainous region of Southern France in the early 1300s. The area was full of heretics. When Jacques Fournier, Bishop of Pamiers, launched an elaborate Inquisition to stamp them out, the peasants and shepherds he interrogated revealed, along with their position on official Catholicism, many details of their everyday life. This study is based on carefully recorded statements of peasants who lived more than 600 years ago. The book includes several pages on the family of Raymond and Alazais Maury, along with their children: Guillaume; Pierre; Jean; Arnaud; Raymond; Bernard; Guillemette; and Raymonde. It has been undetermined if this early Maury family has any connection to the family of Matthew Maury. Includes bibliography and index. Originally published in 1975 in France by Editions Gallimand. Published in New York by Vintage Books Ltd. in 1979. 353 pages.


“A Monument to Sir Edwin Sandys – Letter to Editor to Suggest Also Naming in Honor of Matthew Fontaine Maury.”

In this letter to the editor by Helen Gray of London, she encloses a donation for the planned monument in Virginia to Sir Edwin, an early founder of Virginia, and suggests that a fund should be created to establish at a Virginia institution a Chair of Economics and Political Science that could be named for both Sandys and Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 10, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1929. p. 168.


Mr. and Mrs. Maurye Mentioned in Letter Written by Polly Davis in Spotsylvania Co., VA, October 27, 1789.

Transcription of a letter written on October 27, 1789, by Polly Davis, of “Broadfield” in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, to her sister-in-law, Mrs. Sussanah Davis, wife of Thomas Davis her brother, in Woodford County, near Lexington Kentucky. Polly wrote to Sussanah that she had seen “Mr. and Mrs. Maurye” at church and they had asked about her and how she liked the land in Kentucky. From an article “Two Old Letters” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 12, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in April 1905. p. 435.


Mr. Fontaine, Three Others, Assigned a Room in the New Dormitory, William and Mary College, February 1773.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on February 26, 1773, it was resolved that Mr. Eggleston, Mr. Fontaine, Mr. White, and Mr. Clay [presumably Thomas Clay] have the room at the head of the new dormitory staircase. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Dixon, and Mr. Gwatkin, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1905. p. 27.


“Mr. Rives’ Address, Mentions Letter by Colonel William Fontaine at British Surrender, January 14, 1849.”

Speech by William C. Rives, President of the Virginia Historical Society, at 2nd Annual Meeting in the Hall of Delegates in Richmond, VA, on January 14, 1849. Rives mentions in his speech that he had in his possession a letter written by Colonel William Fontaine written at the time of the surrender of the British at York Town in 1781. Published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser, Volume 2, No. 1, in Richmond, Virginia, by MacFarlane & Fergusson, Printers, in 1849. p. 10.


“Mrs. Corbin’s Biography of Commodore Maury.”

In this book review of Susan P. Lee’s biography of her father entitled Memoirs of William Nelson Pendleton, Rector of Latimer Parish, Lexington, Va., Brigadier General and Chief of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia (published by J. B. Lipincott & Co. in Philadelphia in 1893), it cites that Mrs. [Diana Fontaine Maury] Corbin’s book on the life of Commodore [Matthew Fontaine] Maury is one of three best recent biographies by Southern women. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 2, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1894. p. 117.


Mrs. Mary Mauzy/Maury Married Joseph Waugh, after 1718, Had a Daughter Mary.

Mrs. Mary Mauzy (Maury) patented land in 1718 (Richmond Land Grants, No. 5, folio 196). She married Joseph Waugh after that date, and had a daughter named Mary. Included in a short article by A. F. Klemm, “A Few Waugh Notes,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 37, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1929. p. 162.


“Muster Roll of Dobbs County, North Carolina, Militia, 1771.”

Peter Fountain is listed as #31 on the 28 November 1771 muster roll for the Dobbs County, North Carolina, militia, commanded by Martin Caswell. This appears in Mary E. Spiron’s Old Dobbs County Records, Volume I, published in 1986 in Goldsboro, North Carolina, by the Old Dobbs County Genealogical Society.


Myths About The St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacres, 1572-1576.

Robert McCune Kingdon, Author. An assessment of the Huguenot wars, 1562-1598. Includes bibliography and index. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 1988. 269 pages.


“Nancy Belle (neé Fountain) Massey.”

Obituary for Nancy Massey, age 69, of Chantilly, Virginia, daughter of the late James Warren and Frances Marie (neé Gee) Fountain. The obituary provides details on her husband, children, grandchildren, and siblings. Published in The Herald-Dispatch of Huntington, West Virginia, on Tuesday 25 May 2005. Notification courtesy of Adele Fountain-Salera.


“Nathaniel Hutcherson Land Sale to George Hargraves, Warren County, Georgia, 1811.”

Nathaniel Hutcherson appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to George Hargraves dated 7 January 1811. Adjoining landowners were Abram Greason, Mountain Hill, and Walter Newman. The land was originally granted to Darling McDaniel, other previous owners were Philip Brantley and Isaac Pate. David Golden is listed as deceased but it is unclear if he had been a previous landowner or owned adjoining property. Witnesses to the transaction were Hamilton Goss, John Fontaine, and George Granbery. This abstract appears on page 241 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, page 430.


National Huguenot Society Bible Records Abstracted from the Files of the Society.

Arthur Louis Finnell. This 2004 reprint of the 1996 is comprised of extracted Bible records from the Society’s files. It includes over 2,500 surnames and 25,000 people of likely Huguenot heritage. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“Navy’s Renowned Mapmaker.”

Article in John Kelly’s Washington column answers a query about the origins of the name of Maury Circle at 23rd and D Streets, N.W., in Washington. Kelly provides a brief biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury, from his birth near Fredericksburg in 1806, his travels in the Navy, his leg injury in a stagecoach accident in 1839 that left him partially disabled in that leg for life, and his life’s work of charting the seas. Kelly cites Maury’s 1855 oceanographic textbook, Physical Geography of the Sea, his role in the Confederacy, living after the war in Mexico and eventually returning to Virginia to tech at VMI, and his death in 1873. Published in “John Kelly’s Washington” column in the Washington Post, page C3, on Sunday, June 24, 2007.


De la nécessité d’un systéme général d’observations nautiques et météorologiques.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. “Of the Necessity of a General System for Meterological and Nautical Observations.” Published in Brussels, Belgium, by M. Hayez in 1860. 20 pages.


“The New South and the Old South: Myths and Mythmakers.”

Mentions the standing of Southern scientists like Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 7, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1926. p. 150.


A New Theoretical and Practical Treatise on Navigation.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. On nautical astronomy and mathematics. Published in Philadelphia, PA, by Key and Biddle in 1836. Another edition was published in 1845. 174 pages.


A New Voyage to Carolina.

John Lawson, Author. This 1709 book published in London contains a description of the French Huguenot settlements in North Carolina. John Lawson was an exporter and surveyor. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Newspaper Death Notice for Reverend Walker Maury, 1788.

Listed in this article were notes compiled from the newspaper file at the Library of Congress, from The Gazette of Fredericksburg, VA, a Federalist paper in politics. It lists that on Oct. 23, 1788, “died in Norfolk on the 11th inst. in his 36th year, Rev. Walker Maury, minister of Elizabeth River parish and Master of the Norfolk Academy & co.” From the article “Memoranda from the Fredericksburg, Va., Gazette, 1787-1803,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 13, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in April 1906. p. 426.


Nicholas Fontaine’s Service on board the ‘Frigate South Carolina’ in Revolution.

Nicholas Fontaine is listed in documents relating to a lawsuit relating to his and others’ service on the Frigate South Carolina on behalf of South Carolina in the Revolution. Documents found in the Combined Index to 28 Record Series, 1675-1929, in the South Carolina Department of Archives and History in Columbia, SC. It is unknown what connection, if any, this Nicholas Fontaine has to extended Fontaine family.


“North Carolina Revolutionary Army Accounts: Peter Fontaine.”

Peter “Tontain” appears in North Carolina army accounts for service as “Peter Tontain & Horse (Private) 36 Days, 5/…9.__.__” in 1775/1776 which means he and his horse saw service for 36 days for which he was owed payment. He is listed lower down the page from Henry Darnald who served as adjutant to the New Bern Battalion of Minute Men. Further down the page is George Brewton “do” for 36 days and the same pay. Listed in Weynette Parks Haun’s North Carolina Revolutionary Army Accounts, Secretary of State, Treasurer’s and Comptroller’s Papers Journal ‘A’ (Public Accounts), 1775-1776, Volume I, published in Durham, NC, by the author in 1988, p. 115.


Obituary of Reverend James Maury in the ‘Virginia Gazette.’

A long obituary of Reverend James Maury, who had recently died in Albemarle County. He was the Rector of Fredericksville. The excerpts read “Let it not therefore be thought impertinent to tell the public that the gentleman here spoken of was born in Virginia and brought up at William and Mary College, and was an honour both to his country and the place of his education . . . . It might have been hard to say whether he was more to be admired as a learned man or reverenced as a good man. Appeared in the August 24 issue. “Personal Notices from the Virginia Gazette, January 1769-January 1770,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1900. p. 188.


Ocean Pathfinder; a Biography of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Frances Leigh Williams, Author. Published in New York by Harcourt, Brace & World in 1966. 192 pages, includes a bibliography.


Old Families of Staten Island.

Robert F. Clute, author. This is a 2003 edition with excerpts from Clute’s 1877 book, Annals of Staten Island from Its Discovery to the Present Time, with genealogical essays or notes on 80 early Staten Island families, many with Huguenot heritage. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Old King William Homes and Families: An Account of Some of the Old Homesteads and Families of King William County, Virginia, from Its Earliest Settlement.

Peyton Neale Clarke, Author. Includes a genealogical outline of the Fontaine family, from Jean de la Fontaine through Mary Anne Fontaine Maury to Theophilus Tatum. A review of this book and mention of the Fontaine family is included in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 5, No. 3, in January 1898, p. 357. Published in Baltimore, MD, by Regional Publishing Co., Inc., in 1964. pp. 51-54.


“Officers of the ‘French Church of London, 1643-59.”

Article by Robin D. Gwynn, editor, published as Appendix I in “A Calendar of the Letter Books of the French Church of London from the Civil War to the Restoration, 1643-1659,’” published in the Huguenot Society of London Quarto Series, Volume LIV, in 1979 London by the Huguenot Society, Consistory and Administrative Records, c. 1560-1660, published in 2004 in London on CD by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


On the Establishment of a Universal System of Meteorological Observations, by Sea and Land.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Meteorology observers’ manual. Published in Washington, D.C., by C. Alexander, Printer, in 1851. 30 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


On the Probable Relation between Magnetism and the Circulation of the Atmosphere.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. An article on winds and geomagnetism published in the appendix to the Washington astronomical observations for 1846. Published in Washington, D.C., by C. Alexander, Printer, 1851. 17 pages.


One American Family: Some Maury Memories, Legends and Records.

Lydia Lowndes Maury Skeels, Author. A history of the Maurys from the original emigrants, Matthew Maury and Mary Anne Fontaine, through a number of their descendants, including Matthew Fontaine Maury the oceanographer, his brother John Minor Maury, and nephew Dabney Herndon Maury, the impact of the Civil War, and twentieth century family members including Ellen Maury Slayden, Elizabeth Maury Coombs, Maury Maverick, and Henry Lowndes Maury. Includes information on the Perkins, Henderson, Watson, Price, Norris, Opie, and Kelly families. Self-published by the author by Parousia Press in Storrs, Connecticut, in 1981, as a limited edition with 200 copies. 299 pages, references, and a pull-out genealogical chart. No index.


Original 1752 Appointment Paper of John Maury as Surveyor for Prince Henry Co., VA.

In the “Gifts” section of the annual report, it lists that the late Charles H. Conover of Chicago had given to the Society the original official appointment dated December 6, 1752, of John Maury as surveyor of lands in Prince Henry County, Virginia, signed by Colonel William Fairfax (cousin and agent of Thomas, Lord Fairfax). In the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on March 20, 1916, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 24, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in 1916. p. vii.


“Original Records of the Phi Beta Kappa Society: Brief Personal Sketches, Mentions Rev. William Fontaine.”

Includes information on William Cabell of Nelson County, who was born in 1759. He went first to private schools taught by Rev. William Fontaine and Mr. Robert Buchan, and then in 1777 he attended the Hampton-Sidney Academy. Abstracted from Alexander Brown’s book, Cabells and Their Kin. Article published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1896. p. 250.


“The Origin of the Word Huguenot.”

Article by Janet Gray in Sixteenth Century Journal, Volume 14, Number 3, published in 1983, pp. 349-359. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Our Navy.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. A brief history of the U.S. Navy. Published in Washington, D.C., at the Madisonian Office in 1840. 16 pages.


Owen Fountain, Sheriff in Emanuel County, Georgia, 1824.

Owen Fountain appears in three issues of the Georgia Journal as sheriff of Emanuel County, Georgia. He appears in abstracts of the Tuesday, March 16, Tuesday, June 1, and Tuesday, June 29, 1824, issues of the Georgia Journal on pages 50, 100, and 113, respectively, in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 3: 1824-1828, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Paper on the Gulf Stream and Currents of the Sea.”

Written and read by Matthew Fontaine Maury before the National Institute at its annual meeting on April 2, 1844. Published in the Southern Literary Messenger, Volume X, Issue No. VII, in July 1844 in Richmond.


“Papers Concerning the College.”

Based on the Virginia almanac for 1772, Rev. James Maury Fontaine was on a list of governors and visitors of the college. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 2, No. 1, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in July 1893. p. 37.


Papers of Betty Herndon Maury Maury, 1861-1863.

Diary (June 3, 1861, through February 18, 1863) written chiefly at Fredericksburg, VA, containing detailed comments on the progress of the Civil War, especially in the local area, hardships suffered by Confederate soldiers, and military activities of Mrs. Maury’s father, Matthew Fontaine Maury (including the abortive attempt to capture the U.S.S. Pawnee), her cousin, General Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), and other members of the Maury family. Gift of Mrs. James Parmelee to the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection in 1928. A new published version annotated by Carolyn Carpenter and accompanied by a Who’s Who identifying people mentioned by Betty in her diary was published in 2010 in Volume 9 of Fredericksburg History and Biography and available from the Central Virginia Battlefield Trust.


Papers of Buckingham Smith, Lawyer and Diplomat, 1702-1857.

41 items in 1 container (1 microfilm reel) in the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection. Includes correspondence, book extract, index, and a map relating to Smith’s study of the history of Florida. Correspondents include Alexander Dallas Bache, George Bancroft, John Beard, Thomas H. Benton, John C. Frémont, K. B. Gibbs, Theodore Irving, Matthew Fontaine Maury, Jackson Morton, Henry C. Murphy, A. J. Pickett, Henry R. Schoolcraft, Jared Sparks, George Ticknor, and Mariano Velasquez. The Library of Congress purchased these papers in 1867.


Papers of David Glasgow Farragut, 1816-1869.

400 items in 1 container in the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection. Includes correspondence (including letterbooks), a biographical file, invitations, and other material, chiefly for the period of 1834-1860, relating primarily to Farragut’s naval activities, especially his role in the protection of American interests in Mexico during the pre-Civil War period. Includes letters to Farragut from Charles Folsom and copies of letters from Farragut to James Barron, Charles Baudin, Alexander J. Dallas, John A. Dahlgren, Lyman Copeland Draper, Duncan N. Ingraham, William D. Jones, John Lenthall, Stephen R. Mallory, Matthew F. Maury, Charles Morris, James K. Paulding, Antonio López de Santa Anna, and Isaac Toucey. The Naval Historical Foundation deposited these papers in 1969. They were converted to a gift to the library in 1998.


Papers of Henry Hotze, 1861-1865.

187 items in 1 container in the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection. Biographical information on Henry Hotze, a diplomat, commercial agent, and journalist. Collection includes general and business correspondence relating to the Confederate States of America Commercial Agency in London, England. Correspondents include Judah P. Benjamin, James D. Bulloch, George Eustis, R. M. T. Hunter, George McHenry, C. J. McRay, A. Dudley Mann, Matthew Fontaine Maury, and John Slidell. Collection donated to the Library of Congress by Henry Vignand in 1929.


Papers of Jubal Anderson Early, 1829-1930.

5,000 items in 16 containers plus one microfilm reel in the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection. Includes correspondence, diaries, military papers, speeches and articles, clippings, a scrapbook, printed matter, maps, and extensive Civil War material. The bulk of the collection contains post-war material, relating to Early’s business affairs, his activities in the Southern Historical Society, and aid extended by Early to Confederate families, including that of Jefferson Davis. Includes correspondence with G. T. Beauregard, Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Bradley T. Johnson, Joseph E. Johnston, Fitzhugh Lee, Robert E. Lee, Dabney Herndon Maury, John Singleton Mosby, and Earl Van Dorn. The collection is comprised of a gift to the Library of Congress by A. S. Perham and Ruth H. Early in 1923, plus other gifts and purchases since 1932.

 

Papers of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Collection of Maury’s personal correspondence (about 148 items) with various members of his family, including daughter Diana Fontaine Maury Corbin, son-in-law Spotswood Wellford Corbin, and wife Ann Herndon Maury. Other correspondents include Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, and Empress Carlotta. In addition to personal/domestic matters, topics include Maury’s lecture series, his career at the National Observatory in Washington, D. C., Confederate service in Richmond, activities in England, colonization efforts in Mexico, and his professorship at the Virginia Military Institute. Available in the Virginia Military Institute Archives in Lexington, VA.


Papers of Matthew Fontaine Maury, 1825-1960 (bulk 1830-1880).

14,650 items in 65 containers in the Library of Congress/Archival Manuscript Collection. Includes correspondence, letterbooks, diaries, journals, drafts and printed copies of speeches, articles, and other writings, notebooks, electrical experiment book, charts, and printed material relating chiefly to Maury’s naval career, scientific activities and interests, service as a Confederate agent in England, and work as an immigration official for Southern expatriates in Mexico, and to the Maury family. Also includes papers of Charles Alphonso Smith regarding Maury and a typescript of a life of Maury by Catherine Cate Coblentz. It also contains correspondence from Maury’s wife Ann Maury; his children Nannie Corbin and her husband Wellford Corbin, Matthew Fontaine Maury, Jr., Richard L. Maury, Mary Werth, and Eliza Withers; his cousins Ann Maury and Rutson Maury; and his kinsman Franklin Minor. Other correspondents include William M. Blackford, William C. Hasbrouck, Nathaniel J. Holmes, Marin H. Jansen, Maximilian (Emperor of Mexico), James Hervey Otey, Francis Henney Smith, and F. W. Tremlett. The Maury family donated many of these items to the Library of Congress in 1912. The Library has purchased a number of other items in the collection from 1913 to 1996.


Papers of the Albemarle County Historical Society.

In Volumes 1 (1940-1941) and 2 (1941-1942), a paper entitled A Dissertation on Education in the Form of a Letter from James Maury to Robert Jackson, July 17, 1762, is mentioned. The multi-volume series was published in Charlottesville by the Society. A review of this series was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 24, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1943, p. 236. These books are available in the Library of Virginia in Richmond.


Papers of the Shelby Family, 1789-1947.

Approximately 6,500 items in 17 boxes in the University of Kentucky’s Manuscript Collection in Louisville, Kentucky. Boxes 1 through 6 contain individual family members’ papers, while boxes 7 through 17 contain unarranged miscellaneous and genealogical materials. Includes a 1851 letter by Sarah Fontaine Floyd, wife of George Rogers Clark Floyd, to Isaac Shelby (transcribed elsewhere in this bibliography). There are also several letters that relate to the Bullock-Fontaine families, including one dated 1802 from Sally Travis Fontaine to M. A. Bullock.


“The Parson’s Cause, 1755-1765.”

This two-part article, by Glenn Curtis Smith, is a careful analysis of the Parson’s Cause, a case involving the Reverend James Maury and Patrick Henry’s first case. It includes extensive footnotes. This is an excellent history. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine. The first installment of the article appears in Volume 21, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1939, pp. 140-177. The second installment and conclusion appears in Volume 21, Number 4, published in April 1940, pp. 291-306.


The Parson’s Cause, 1763.

This is an excellent short summary of the Parson’s Cause involving the Reverend James Maury as the plaintiff and Patrick Henry as the defendant’s counsel in his first court case. “The Parson’s Cause,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 20, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1912. pp. 172-173.


The Path Finder of the Seas: The Life of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

John W. Wayland, Author. Published in 1930 in Richmond, VA, by Garrett & Massie. 191 pages.


Patrick Henry, the ‘Parson’s Cause’ Case Brought by Rev. James Maury, and the Move Toward Revolution.

Provides a summary of the famous “Parson’s Case” which was Patrick Henry’s first court case. It was brought by the Reverend James Maury against his vestry for damages caused by the “Two Penny Act.” The focus of the summary is on Patrick Henry and actions taking place that helped lead to Revolution. “Williamsburg – The Old Colonial Capital,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 16, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1907. p. 24.


“Patrick Henry’s Paper Cutter.”

This article includes an 1859 account by William Winston Fontaine, great-grandson of Patrick Henry, of the Convention of March 1775, as told by ex-President Tyler, who had heard the story from his father, Judge John Tyler. Patrick Henry held a paper cutter in his hand during his oratory in that Convention. Fontaine visited Richmond in 1861 at the time of the Secession Convention and showed Tyler the paper cutter. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 8, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1927. pp. 174-175.


Patsy Minor Fontaine, born to Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell, March 14, 1785.

To Aaron Fontain and Barbara Terrell was born a daughter, Patsy Minor, born March 14, 1785. Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 249.


The Peasants of Languedoc.

Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie, Author. A history of the peasantry and economic aspects of Languedoc, France. Translated from the French by John Day. Includes a bibliography. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 1976. 370 pages.


“Pennington.”

A history of the descendants of Sir John de Pennington of Kent, a servant of King Henry VI. One of his descendants, Sophia Clapham Bruce (born 1864), one of six children of Catherine Cook (born 1840) and Wilkins Bruce (1838-1906), married Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 3, originally published in Baltimore in 1912, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 392.


“Peter Perkins (estate) Sale to John Wilkins, Warren County, Georgia, 1802.”

Peter Perkins is listed in an abstract in which he sells land to John Wilkins; based on an 1801 comparable entry for his estate, the sale was likely by his administrators. Adjoining landowners named were Joseph White, Solomon Thompson, and Thomas Fontaine. Solomon Thompson witnessed the transaction. This appears on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, page 396.


“Peter Perkins, Deceased, Estate Sale of Land to Jethro Darden, Warren County, Georgia, 1801.”

Peter Perkins, deceased, is listed in an abstract in which John Torrence and John Baker are selling land to Jethro Darden that had been originally granted to Dread Wilder. Adjoining landowners identified are Ignatius Few, William White, Timothy Matthews, estate of Robert Parker, James Matthews, William Wilkins, and Thomas Fontain. Witnesses were Robert Hill and Debeca Chapman. This appears on page 201 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, page 214.


Petition of Subscribers to Governor Beverly Randolph, Esq.

This petition was dated October 12, 1791, in Fredericksburg. It states that the signatories had known Humphrey, a slave now a condemned prisoner in jail in Fredericksburg after being found guilty of a crime, was an honest and faithful slave and his guilt was the result of the wickedness of others, so asked the governor for a pardon. It was signed by 38 people, including Fontaine Maury. Published in Dr. William P. Palmer and Sherwin McRae’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from July 10, 1790, to August 10, 1792, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 5, published in Richmond, VA, in 1885. p. 378.


Petition of Sundry Citizens of the County of Albemarle and Others, Attending the Sale of the Estate of the late Thomas Jefferson at Monticello.

The petitioners recommended that the State of Virginia buy the bust of Jefferson by Cerachi and place it at the library of the University of Virginia. It was signed on January 17, 1827, at Monticello. Among the 94 signatures was Thomas W. Maury. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 8, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1927. p. 245.


Petition from Lawrence Brooke, John T. Brooke, and Many Citizens of Spotsylvania to Governor James Wood.

A group of Spotsylvania, VA, citizens sent a petition to the Governor on July 1, 1799, requesting the pardon of a Negro man named John who was convicted in the Spotsylvania court of the arson of Fontaine Maury’s property. He was convicted on June 4, 1799, and condemned to be hanged on July 5, 1799. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1799, to December 31, 1807, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 9, published in Richmond, VA, in 1890. p. 35.


Peter Fontaine, Jr., of Lunenburg County, Surveyed Halifax, 1752.

Mentions that Peter Fontaine, Jr., who lived in Lunenburg County, and was surveyor of Halifax, noted the deserted Fort Christiana in 1752. “Brunswick County and Fort Christiana,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 9, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1901. p. 217.


Physical Description of the Botetourt Medals Issued 1772-1775; Fontaine Maury Won One in 1774.

A physical description of the two gold medals issued each year for four years by Lord Botetourt, when governor, one for excellence in mathematics and one for excellence in the classics, to students at William & Mary College. Maury Walker received the medal in 1774 for excellence in the classics. “The First Collegiate Medals,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1896. p. 264.


The Physical Geography of the Sea.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. This is a famous publication of Maury. Published in 1856 in London by S. Low & Son. 348 pages, includes maps, charts, and diagrams.


Physical Survey of Virginia: Her Resources, Climate and Production.

Preliminary report No. II by Matthew Fontaine Maury, with notes and additions by his son, Richard L. Maury. A description of Virginia and its economic conditions. The additions by Richard Maury are dated July 1, 1877. The report was prepared by the direction of the Virginia Board of Immigration. Published in Richmond, VA, by N. V. Randolph in 1878. 142 page.


Portrait, Brief Facts of Matthew Fontaine Maury.

A portrait of Matthew Fontaine Maury is one of nine published of famous Virginians. Alongside his portrait are several facts – his birth and death dates and places, and a quote of his last words as he died, taken from Diana Fontaine Maury Corbin’s book, Life of Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 30, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1922. pp. 99, 118-119.


Prison Life of One of The Immortal Six Hundred, by Lamar Fontaine, C.E., Ph.D.

A lively 60-page account of Fontaine’s captivity from August 1864 to June 1865, among 600 Confederate Army and Navy officers held on the prison ship, Crescent City, on Morris Island, Ft. Pulaski, and Hilton Head. Note that Lamar Fontaine is known to be colorful in his writing and it may not be historically accurate. Published in 1910 by Daily Register Print in Clarksdale, Mississippi.. Free for download courtesy of F. J. (“Rocky”) Stewart. The hand-written inscription by Lamar Fontaine on the title page is to Rocky’s great-grandfather.


Probate of Wills of Agnes Manry/Maury, 1797, and Henry Manry/Maury, 1772, Sussex Co. VA.

Agnes Manry’s will is listed as probated in 1797, recorded in Book F, page 66. Henry Manry’s will is listed as probated in 1772, recorded in Book C, page. 31. The index lists both Agnes and Henry as “Maury” and not Manry. Article based on compilation by W. B. Cridlin, “Sussex County Wills (VA), from Organization in 1754 to 1804 (Some Later),” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 21, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1913. p. 269.


“Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society Annual Meeting of January 27, 1912.”

In the introduction of the proceedings, it thanks William Winston Fontaine and others for their contributions to the magazine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 20, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1912. p. xiv.


“Proceedings of the Visitors of William and Mary College 1716.”

Includes several mentions of James Fontaine, who taught a private academy, and was considered for employment at the college. Fontaine’s qualifications were reviewed, and it was decided in a meeting on June 20, 1716, to send him a letter offering him the position of Professor of Philosophy and Mathematics. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 4, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1896. pp. 171-172, 173.


“Professors at William & Mary College.”

Includes a biography on Charles Morris, who was born on April 26, 1826, at his father’s home, Taylor’s Creek, in Hanover County, Virginia. He was the youngest child of Richard Morris and his wife Mary Watts. On his mother’s side, he was related to the Holcomb, Preston, Robertson, and Fontaine families. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 4, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1922, p. 130.


Pronunciation of Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury’s Surname.

This is a critical review of B.W. Green’s book, Word-Book of Virginia Folk Speech (Richmond, published by Wm. Ellis Jones, 1899). The review criticizes the way Green would pronounce such well-known names as Commodore [Matthew Fontaine] Maury. The review was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 7, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1899. p. 220.


Proposed Book on the Seldens of Virginia to Include Many Other Family Connections, Including the Fontaine Family.

Mrs. Kennedy proposes to write a book on Seldens of Virginia by soliciting subscribers. She includes a long list of families that she would include in such a history, including the Fontaine family. “The Seldens of Virginia and Allied Families,” a book proposed by contributions from subscribers by Mrs. Stephen Dandridge Kennedy of Warrenton, Va., published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1905. p. 212. The same notice appeared in Volume 14, No. 1, in July 1905. p. 69.


Protestant Exiles from France in the Reign of Louis XIV, or, The Huguenot Refugees and Their Descendants in Great Britain and Ireland.

David C. A. Agnew, Author. Includes lengthy description of the Fontaine and Maury families, based on the 1853 edition of Memoirs of a Huguenot Family. 2nd edition published in London by Reeves & Turner in 1871. 2 volumes. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


Le Protestant Français.

Émile G. Léonard, Author. A history of Protestants in France. Includes a bibliography. Press Universitaires de France. 1955. 316 pages.


The Quiet Conquest: The Huguenots [in England] 1685-1985.

Museum of London. A “coffee table” book on the Huguenots of England, including their contributions to art, architecture, silver smithing, gun making, medicine, etc. Published in London by the Museum of London in 1985. 326 pages, indexed.


“Quitrent by Francis Fontaine for Property in New Bern, North Carolina, dated 5 September 1783.”

Francis Fontaine, “House Joiner”, “of Edistoe in the State of South Carolina but formerly of the town of New Bern in the County of Craven in the Province of North Carolina” signed a document affirming that he had sold two lots, No. 280 and 281, in the town of New Bern to John Wright Stanly for One Hundred Spanish Milled Dollars on 27 March 1753. The document was signed in the presence of John Risher, Benjamin Risher, Francis Hill, and one other witness whose name was illegible, signed on 5 September 1783. Document reviewed in Craven Co. North Carolina Record of Deeds No. 24 1779-1789, on Family History Microfilm 0018653 by Brian H. Nilsson on 23 November 2013.


“Radford Butt Land Sale to John Butt, Warren County, Georgia, 1812.”

Radford Butt appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to John Butt dated 31 July 1812. The original land grant owner was John Hill. Witnesses to the transaction were John Fontain and Jeremiah Butt. This abstract appears on page 247 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, page 544.


Recent Facts Concerning Physical Geography.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Updated textbook on physical geography. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. in 1887. 4 pages.


“Recollections of Piedmont.”

This typescript copy from around 1940 of the remembrances of Jane Maury Maverick (1858-1954) of “Piedmont,” the Albemarle, Virginia, home of the Maurys. Available in the University of Virginia Library’s Manuscripts Division in its Special Collections Department, Charlottesville, Virginia.


New! Reconstruction at Sewanee: The Founding of the University of the South and its First Administration 1857-1872.

Arthur Chitty, Author. This book was originally written as Chitty’s thesis at Tulane University in 1952. This book includes details about the University’s attempt to recruit Matthew Fontaine Maury as Vice Chancellor after the Civil War. Maury declined the offer and eventually taught at Virginia Military Institute. Published in 1954 in Sewanee, Tennessee, by the University Press, 206 pages including a bibliography.


The Records of Oxford (Massachusetts), Including Chapters of Nipmuck, Huguenot and English History, Accompanied with Biographical Sketches and Notes, 1630-1890; with Manners and Fashions of the Time.

Mary DeWitt Freeland, Author. This is a 2003 reprint of the original 1894 edition. It includes a history of Oxford, Massachusetts, including the 1689 arrival of French Huguenots. The last 150 pages include genealogical and biographical information on over 40 Oxford families. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


“Reddick Mathews Land Sale to Francis Spann, Warren County, Georgia, 1805.”

Reddick Mathews appears in an abstracted transaction for sale (presumably land) to Francis Spann dated 13 December 1805. Witnesses to the transaction were Solomon Mathews, Henry Brannen, Thomas Fontaine, and Solomon Lockett. Francis Spann was a son-in-law to John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 230 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, pages 202-203.


Reference in a Letter to Reverend Walker Maury’s Grammar School in Williamsburg, 1786.

This letter appears to be a reply to a previously published letter and is apparently sarcastic in the first part. The university referred to was William and Mary. Nesbitt’s Academy was probably in Georgia. The Mr. Maury referenced as head of the grammar school in Williamsburg was probably the Reverend Walker Maury. The letter is republished from its original publication on June 28, 1786, in The Virginia Gazette and American Advertizer. The author signed his name as Philomathes. Article entitled “A Defence of William and Mary College and Virginia Grammar Schools, 1786,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1911. pp. 314, 315.


Reference to an Error in General Dabney Maury’s Book Pertaining to Henry Clay.

Cites an error repeated by General Dabney Maury in his book that while attorney general, Governor Robert Brooke taught Henry Clay as a law student. A description of the death of Robert Brooke by a cannon ball is cited from General Maury’s book, Recollections of a Virginian. Continuation of the article by Professor St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgantown, WV, “The Brooke Family,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 19, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1911. pp. 208, 211.


The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century.

Roland H. Bainton, Author, with a foreword and supplemental bibliography by Jaroslav Pelikan. Includes bibliography and index. Originally published in 1952. Boston: Beacon Press. 1985. 278 pages.


Reformation, Revolt, and Civil War in France and the Netherlands, 1555 to 1585.

Philip Benedict, Editor. Addresses the Huguenot wars of 1562 to 1598 and the Dutch wars of independence, 1556 to 1648. Proceedings of the colloquium in Amsterdam on October 29-31, 1997. Includes bibliography and index. Amsterdam: Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science. 1999. 298 pages.


Refraction and Other Tables.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author, U.S. Naval Observatory. Astronomical refraction. Published in Washington, D.C., by J. & G. S. Gideon in 1846. 24 pages.


Le Refuge Protestant dans le Pays de Vaud: Fin XVIIe début XVIIIe s., Aspects d’une Migration.

Marie-Jeanna Ducommun and Dominique Quadroni. Huguenots and religious refugees in Vaud, Switzerland. Includes a bibliography. L’Association pour L'Historie du Refugee Huguenot. Geneva: Droz. 1991.

Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society.

Arthur Louis Finnell, Author. 4th Edition. Bloomington, IN: National Huguenot Society. 1995.


Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society.

Jeannine Sheldon Kallal, Author. 5th Edition, National Huguenot Society, Inc., 2012. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Registers of the French Church of Portarlington, Ireland, 1694-1816.

Huguenot Society of London. Volume XIX. Printed in London by Spottiswoode & Co., Ltd. 1908.


The Registers of the French Church of Threadneedle Street, London, 1637-1685.

Huguenot Society Quarto Series, Volumes IX, XIII, and XVI, published in Lymington, England, by the Huguenot Society of London, 1896-1899, included in the Registers of the French Church of Threadneedle Street, London, on CD, published 2004 in London by the Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Volume I includes 1600-1639, Volume II 1637-1685, and Volume II 1685-1714. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Renaissance and Reformation France, 1500-1648.

Mack P. Holt, Editor. A short history of France in the 16th and 17th centuries. Includes a bibliography and index. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. 2002.


Renaissance Warrior and Patron, the Reign of Francis I.

Robert Jean Knecht, Author. Includes bibliography and index. A biography of Francis I, King of France from 1515 to 1547. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 1994. 612 pages. Table of contents available on-line on the Library of Congress webpage.


Report about the Matthew Fontaine Maury Association to the Virginia Historical Society, 1918.

During the annual meeting, Mr. E. E. Moffett reported on the history and aims of the Matthew Fontaine Maury Association and asked for the Society’s endorsement of the Association. In the proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on March 18, 1918, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 26, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in 1918. p. lii.


Report of Captain S. Barron upon the Naval Defences of the Rivers of Virginia.

Barron worked in the Office of Naval Detail and Equipment. He prepared this report on June 10, 1861, in Richmond. Included on his list of naval defenses was Sewell’s Point, William Lewis Maury, Commander. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. pp. 166-169.


Report of Committee Appointed by Resolution of Council of 3rd Instance to Confer with the President of the Confederate States on Certain Points Embraced in the Terms of the Resolution Adopted.

This report, dated June 4, 1861, in Richmond, summarized the views of the President for troops allowed to enter into service for Virginia. The committee stated that by submitting the report, they did not wish to agree or dissent from the position assumed by the President. It was signed by John L. Allen, Francis H. Smith, and Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts, from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume 11, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. pp. 145-146.


“Report of the Pamunkey Expedition.”

Report by Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart to General Robert E. Lee, written June 17, 1862. Stuart commends Assistant Surgeon J. B. Fontain of the 4th Virginia Cavalry for his reconnaissance efforts and help in completing the construction of a bridge. Stuart appended a recommendation to his report for Fontain to be made surgeon of his regiment. Included in H. W. Flournoy’s book, Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts from January 1, 1836, to April 15, 1869, Preserved in the Capitol at Richmond, Volume XI, published in Richmond, VA, in 1893. p. 220.


Report on the Harbor of Charleston.

Alexander Dallas Bache, Charles Henry Davis, John Newland Maffit, Matthew Fontaine Maury, and John D. Kurtz, Co-Authors. A description of the Charleston Harbor for the Charleston Chamber of Commerce. Published in Charleston, S.C., by Councell & Daggett Printing Office in 1852. 30 pages.


Resources of West Virginia.

Matthew Fontaine Maury and William Morris Fontaine, Authors. Prepared under the direction of the State Board of Centennial Managers, for display at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. The book describes West Virginia and its economic conditions. Published in Wheeling, WV, by The Register Company in 1876. 430 pages, indexed.


Reverend Francis Fontaine in Attendance of Master’s Meeting at William & Mary College, August 1729.

Revd. Mr. Francis Fontaine is listed as attending the meeting of August 16, 1729. He was the son of Rev. James Fontaine, educated at Oxford, came to Virginia in May 1721, was Rector of York-Hampton Parish 1724, died 1749. Francis Fontaine also listed as being in attendance at the meeting of November 6, 1729. He is listed as Professor of Oriental Languages. Continuation of article, “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College - 1729-1784,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 1, No. 3, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in January 1893. pp. 131, 132, 134.


“Reverend Francis Fontaine, Professor at William and Mary College, Mentioned August, November 1729.”

A brief history of William and Mary College. Includes an explanation that by 1729 all but two of the original trustees of the college were deceased, so Sir John Randolph was sent to England to obtain a transfer of the college and all its property to a new set of trustees. Sir John delivered the transfer on August 15, 1729, to Rev. James Blair, President and Trustee, in the presence of three professors, including Reverend Francis Fontaine. Mentions a trustee meeting held in November 1729 with the faculty, which included the Reverend Francis Fontaine, Professor of Oriental Languages. An article, “William and Mary College,” published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser Volume 3, Number 4, in Richmond, VA, by MacFarlane & Fergusson, Printers, in 1850. pp. 194-199.


“Reverend James Fontaine on a List of Carriage Owners, Gloucester County, 1784.”

List submitted by Edward Wilson James. Reverend James Fontaine is included on the list as owner of a post chaise [a lightweight carriage drawn by one or two horses]. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 13, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1906. p. 313.


Reverend James Maury and the ‘Parson’s Cause,’ 1763.

An Act in 1748 reset the value of inspected tobacco from one set in 1696. In 1755, because of a drought, an act was passed to allow debtors to settle in money at the fixed rate. Tobacco was worth more, so the clergy appealed to the Bishop of London in 175, asking that the act be annulled by the King. Many lawsuits followed, most notably the case of the Rev. James Maury, of the Parish of Fredericksville, in Louisa County, who sued to recover the tobacco. Patrick Henry was counsel for the defendants. On November 5, 1763, the court voided the act of 1758 but when the jury settled the amount of damages, after five minutes’ deliberations, they awarded Maury only one penny. Included in James Mercer Garnett’s article, “The Last Fifteen Years of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1761-1776,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 18, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1910. p. 215.


Reverend James Maury Library Inventory, 1774.

The intent of this article was to document how Virginians were readers. It is a compiled lists taken from some Virginia county records, which name persons by county and date of the inventory or probate of will. The list in the article includes the Rev. James Maury, in Albemarle County, 1774, with 400 volumes of books and 44 pamphlets. “Books in Colonial Virginia” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 7, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1900. p. 302. The same entry appears in a clarification article in Volume 10, No. 4, of April 1903, p. 392.


“Reverend James Maury Fontaine on List of Officers in Clergy Organization to Raise Funds for Widows and Orphans of Clergymen, 1774.”

The previous title of this summary omitted the name “Fontaine” which is now corrected. The following text was correct in naming the Reverend James Maury Fontaine, who was a son of the Reverend Francis Fontaine and his second wife, Susannah Brush. The original article was a reprint of a March 24, 1774, announcement of the next meeting of The Subscribers to the Fund for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans of Clergyman on Saturday, April 30, 1774. Lists 9 officers, including Reverend James Maury Fontaine. An article “Gazetteiana” published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser, Volume 6, Number 4, in Richmond, VA, by MacFarland & Fergusson, Printers, in 1853. p. 216.


Reverend James Maury’s Son Appointed as Surveyor of a County, September 1766.

At a meeting of the President and Masters of William & Mary College on September 13, 1766, they resolved that the son of the Reverend James Maury be appointed as surveyor of a county, per Maury’s written request of April 10, 1766, as long as the appointment does not interfere with those already in commission. Those present were the President, the Reverend Horrocks, and Mr. Camm and Mr. Jones. Included in a continuation article, “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1896. p. 189.


Reverend Matthew Maury is Minister for Frederickville Parish, Albemarle Co., VA, 1774.

Reverend Matthew Maury was the minister for the Frederickville parish within Albemarle County in 1774. There were two parishes in Albemarle, Frederickville and Saint Anne. “A List of Parishes, and the Ministers in Them,” taken from Purdie & Dixon’s Virginia Almanac for 1774, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1897. p. 200.


Reverend Peter Fontaine of Charles City Co. Participates in Expedition to Identify VA, NC Border, 1728.

In 1728 William Byrd, Richard Fitzwilliam, and William Dandridge proceeded as commissioners on the part of Virginia to run the line between Virginia and North Carolina. Two experienced surveyors, William Mayo and Alexander Irvine, were directed to wait upon them; a number of other men were made to go on the expedition, and Rev. Peter Fontaine, a chaplain of Charles City County, was made to attend to them. “Hicks Family,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 11, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1902. p. 130.


“Reverend Walker Maury Appointed to Lead The Norfolk Academy, October 3, 1786.”

At a meeting on October 3, 1786, it was resolved that Rev. Walker Maury be appointed to take charge of the Public School of this Borough. An article, “The Norfolk Academy,” by Edward W. James, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 3, No. 1, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in July 1894. pp. 4, 5.


Reverend Walker Maury Leadership of Norfolk School in 1786 through his death 1788.

The Norfolk school was destroyed when it and other buildings burned. In 1786 the Common Council appropriated £300 to rebuild the school. The new building was 60 feet by 22 feet and two stories tall. Rev. Walker Maury, a graduate of William and Mary, was appointed to lead it, under the rules and regulations drawn up by a committee of the council. These provided for instruction in reading, writing, arithmetic, book-keeping, English grammar, world geography, and Latin, Greek and French. A footnote cites a March 7, 1787, letter from Maury to Benjamin Waller of Williamsburg about the usher’s salary. Rev. Maury is cited as dying in 1788 and Rev. Alexander Whitehead, of the University of Glasgow, elected to succeed him. Taken from Part III of an article, “Education in Colonial Virginia: Free Schools,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1897. p. 81.


Richard L. Maury’s Book Added to Virginia Historical Society Collection 1900.

R. L. [Richard Lancelot] Maury’s book, The Huguenot in Virginia, appears in the list of new additions to the Society’s library since the prior annual meeting. Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society held on December 31, 1900, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 8, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in 1900. p. vi.


Richard Lancelot Maury Introduction about the Huguenots at Manakin Town.

Col. R. L [Richard Lancelot] Maury wrote the introduction to this article, providing an overview of the Huguenot colony at Manakin Town in Virginia. Maury ended the introduction by citing that he was fifth in descent from Abraham Maury of Castel Moron, and eighth from Jean de la Fontaine of Le Mans, martyred in 1561. An article translated by Prof. R. H. Fife of Wesleyan University of a book in the possession of Miss Leila Walker, Ft. Estill, KY, “The Vestry Book of King William Parish, VA., 1707-1750,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 11, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in January 1904. pp. 289, 293.


“Richard Lovett Land Sale to Lemuel Lovett, Warren County, Georgia, 1811.”

Richard Lovett appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to Lemuel Lovett dated 14 May 1811. The original land grant owner was Samuel Camp; John Rushing had been a previous owner to Richard Lovett. Witnesses to the transaction were John Fountaine and Hamilton Gross. This abstract appears on page 252 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book D, pages 8-9.


The Rise and Fall of Renaissance France: 1483 to 1610.

R. J. Knecht, Author. 2nd Edition. First published in 1996 in London. A history of the House of Valois, 1328 to 1589, and of the Bourbons, 1589 to 1789. Includes bibliography and index. Malden, MA: Blackwell. 2001.


“Robert Beverley, the Historian of Virginia.”

This article on Robert Beverley discusses the June 1715 visit by John Fontaine to Beverley’s home, where he inspected the vineyards and favorably sampled the wine, Beverley’s recent hobby, as documented in John Fontaine’s journal. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 36, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1928. p. 340.


“Roll of Members.”

In the college’s list of members, it lists William Fontaine, January 1779-October 1780. William is listed as the son of Colonel Peter Fontaine. William was a lieutenant colonel in the Revolution, and married Ann Morris, daughter of William Morris. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 1, No. 1, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in July 1892. p. 21.


Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution.

Cites the military service of Francis Fontaine/Fountaine, who enlisted in the Second Regiment on November 1, 1776, John Fontaine/Fountain who served in the Colleton County Regiment of Militia under a Captain Hardin during 1775, and Peter Fountain who served in the militia under Captains Charles Harden and Peter Youngblood during 1781 and 1782. Book by Bobby Gilmer Moss published in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co. in 1985, pp. 321, 327.


Rouen During the Wars of Religion.

Philip Benedict, Author. The Huguenot wars covering the period 1562 to 1598. Includes a bibliography and index. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 1981. 297 pages.


Sailing Directions from Sea to Sandy Hook.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. A pilot guide for Sandy Hook. Published separately by the authority of the Honorable J. C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy. Published in Philadelphia, PA, by E.C. & J. Biddle in 1855. 8 pages.


“Sale of the Estate of John Fountain dec’d 10 Aug 1758.”

This summary appears in Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.’s book Craven County, North Carolina, Volume 1 – 1737-1766 (Deeds, Wills, Inventories), self-published by the author in Lawrenceville, VA, in 2001, p. 20, entry 145, listed as page 176, which includes Craven County Wills, Deeds, and Inventories for 1749-1777. It states that there were many items listed for the sale but no buyers are named. Included in the sale were 1 negro wench Febe and 1 girl Lucy. The sale was signed by Jos. Carruthers, Sheriff. This John Fountain was John Fontaine, brother of Francis Fontaine, Jr., and son of the Reverend Francis Fontaine. Mr. Bradley notes that these records were abstracted from microfilm reel C.028.80023 and a portion of reel C.028.80024 at the North Carolina State Archives.


“Sally Fontaine Married James Threewits; Warren County, Georgia, 1803.”

Sally Fontaine and James Threewits are listed as married on 8 November 1803 in Warren County, Georgia. Sally was Sarah Fontaine, daughter of Peter or Benjamin Fontaine and his wife, Mary Bruton. This entry appears in the Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., book, Some Georgia County Records, Volume I, published in Easley, South Carolina, by Southern Historical Press in 1977.


“Samuel Davis Appoints James Fontaine Attorney to Receive Bounty Land for Him, 1784 in Georgia.”

Samuel Davis received a certificate from General John Twiggs and Col. E. Clarke on 2 February 1784 that he was entitled to bounty land as a citizen and refugee soldier and requested a grant in Washington County on 27 April 1784. He appointed James Fontaine attorney to receive the land. This appears on p. 65 of Lucian Lamar Knight’s article, “Certificates of Service in the American Revolution – One File in the Office of the Secretary of State, in the State Capitol,” in Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution: Containing a List of the State’s Defenders, Officers and Men; Soldiers and Sailors, Partisans and Regulars, Whether Enlisted from Georgia or Settled in Georgia After the Close of Hostilities, published in 1967 in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co.


Sarah Fontaine, born to Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell, March 17, 1787.

To Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrill was born a daughter, Sarah Fontaine, born March 17, 1787. Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 250.


“Sarah Fountain, Widow of Revolutionary Soldier, on Jefferson County, Georgia, Land Lottery List, 1821.”

Sarah Fountain, Wid., appears on a list of revolutionary soldiers, widows, and daughters in the Jefferson County, Georgia, Ordinary Office in Louisville as entitled to draws in the Lottery of 1821, as copied by Helen M. Prescott. The index lists Jourdan Fountain but there is no Jourdan listed. A Fountain Jourdan appears on a comparable index for land lottery grants in Elbert County, Georgia, but this person does not appear on the actual entries. Sarah Fountain appears on page 315 of Lucian Lamar Knight’s article, “Land Lottery Grants – Jefferson County List,” in Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution: Containing a List of the State’s Defenders, Officers and Men; Soldiers and Sailors, Partisans and Regulars, Whether Enlisted from Georgia or Settled in Georgia After the Close of Hostilities, published in 1967 in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co.


“Sarah Threewitts Applies for Letters of Administration on Estate of Peter Fontain, Deceased, 1815

Sarah Threewitts applied for letters of administration for the estate of Peter Fontain, deceased, in Washington County, Georgia. Recorded on December 3, 1815, by county clerk. This appears in an abstract of the Wednesday, December 20, 1815, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 491 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 1: 1808-1818, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


Second Family of Reverend Peter Fontaine 1691-1757.

Randolph Newell Currie, Author. Self-published in Sylvania, OH, by the author. 7 pages.


Seeker of Seaways, A Life of Matthew Fontaine Maury, Pioneer Oceanographer.

Janice J. Beaty, Author. Published in 1966 in New York by Pantheon Books. 85 pages.


“Selden – Mary Bowles Armistead Selden, Daughter of Bowles and Mary Fontaine Armistead.”

This article provides a history of descendants of John Selden (died 1616) and Margaret Baker of Farring, England. Dr. Wilson Cary Selden (1761-1835), one of eight children of Colonel Wilson Cary Selden (1723-1792) and Elizabeth Jennings, was married on July 17, 1818, with Mary Bowles Armistead, daughter of Bowles and Mary (Fontaine) Armistead and widow of Charles Alexander. She was his third wife. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 1, originally published in New York in 1907, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. pp. 471-472.


Seldens of Virginia and Allied Families.

Mary Selden Kennedy, Author. History of the Seldens and 28 other families, including the Fontaines. Published in 1911 in New York by Frank Allaben Genealogical Co. 2 volumes. 1,363 pages.


“Selections from the Campbell Papers.”

Letter from Dr. George Gilmer to Colonel Theoderick Bland, Jr., dated June 16, 1799. He wrote that Colonel William Fontain informed him that he had about 20 sick men, some seriously, and asks him to come to help. Dr. Gilmer had no horse, so wrote to Colonel Bland to ask if he could borrow one. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 9, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1902. p. 299.


“Septimus Weatherby sale of land to Thomas Fontaine, Warren County, Georgia, 1801.”

Septimus Weatherby is listed in an abstract as selling land to Thomas Fontaine on 31 December 1801 in Warren County, Georgia. Josiah Randol is listed as an adjoining neighbor. This appears on page 193 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, page 47.


Several Fontaine Books in Robert Carter Collection.

Robert Carter’s large collection included Fontaine’s Fables and Cupid, & Pisyche. “A Catalogue of Books in the Library of ‘Councillor’ Robert Carter, at Nomini Hall, Westmoreland County, Va.,” from the MSS journal and papers of Philip Vickers Fithian, now in the University Library at Princeton, NJ, contributed by John Rogers Williams of Princeton University, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1902. pp. 238, 240.


“Sheriff’s Sale of Lot of Thomas M. Tarpley that Adjoins James Fountain; Wilkinson County, Georgia; 1839.”

Announcement of an upcoming sheriff’s sale on the first Tuesday in April 1839 in Irwinton of Lot 108 and 102/4 dist., belonging to Thomas M. Tarpley and adjoining John Gibson and James Fountain, to satisfy a successful lawsuit by Thomas J. Parmaler. This announcement appears in an abstract of the Tuesday, 26 February 1839, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 257 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 5 1836-1840, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Sheriff’s Sale of 5 Negroes of Rowell Adams in Favor of John Fontaine, John G. Winters, and Others; Warren County, Georgia; 1832.”

Announcement of an upcoming sheriff’s sale on the first Tuesday in February 1833 in Warrenton of five Negroes belonging to Rowell Adams to satisfy a successful lawsuit by John Fontaine, John G. Winters, and others. This was likely John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This announcement appears in an abstract of the Monday, 26 November 1832, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 491 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Sheriff’s Sale of 4 Negroes of Henry Ivy in Favor of John Fontaine; Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

Announcement of an upcoming sheriff’s sale on the first Tuesday in February 1833 in Warrenton of four Negroes belonging to Henry Ivy to satisfy a successful lawsuit by John Fontaine. This is likely John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This appears in an abstract of the Thursday, 3 January 1833, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 501 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Sheriff’s Sale of 6 Negroes of Robert Hill in Favor of John Fontaine; Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

Announcement of an upcoming sheriff’s sale on the first Tuesday in March 1833 in Warrenton of six Negroes belonging to Robert Hill to satisfy a successful lawsuit by John Fontaine. This is likely John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866). This announcement appears in an abstract of the Thursday, 31 January 1833, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 511 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“Sheriff’s Sale of 340 Acres of Terry Oliver in Favor of John Fontaine, George Hargraves, and Others; Warren County, Georgia; 1833.”

Announcement of an upcoming sheriff’s sale on the first Tuesday in March 1833 in Warrenton of 340 acres belonging to Terry Oliver to satisfy a successful lawsuit by John Fontaine, George Hargraves and others. This was likely John Maury Fontaine (1792-1866) whose mother-in-law’s surname was Hargraves so George Hargraves was likely a relative. This announcement appears in an abstract of the Thursday, 31 January 1833, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 511 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 4 1829-1835, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“The Slave Trade, Slavery and Liberia.”

This article was prepared for the Episcopal Mission Study Class on Africa. It mentions Matthew Fontaine Maury’s great Brussels Conference of 1858. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 19, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1937. p. 27.


“The Smiths of Virginia.”

Mentions that Augustine Smith was born on January 3, 1739, at 5 pm at Yorktown and was christened on January 15 by the Revd. Mr. [Francis] Fountain. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1895. p. 49.


Social Ferment in Vermont, 1791-1850.

David M. Ludlum, Author. Mentions that in 1859, a Vermonter, President-to-be, Chester A. Arthur (President, 1881-1885), married the daughter of a noble southerner, Lewis Herndon, who was a relative of Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 22, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1940. p. 63.


“The Society of the Cincinnati in Fredericksburg Marks Its Birthplace and Confers Honorary Membership on General Marshall, Chief of Staff of the United States Army, 30 March 1940.”

This article cites various locations of interest to the Society of the Cincinnati in Fredericksburg. It includes reference to the home of Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury in Charlotte Street near Princess Anne Street. Maury was the nephew of Lieutenant Abraham Maury, an original member of the Virginia Cincinnati. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 22, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1940. p. 33.


Society and Culture in the Huguenot World, 1559-1685.

Raymond A. Mentzer and Andrew Spicer, Editors. Includes bibliography and index. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 2002. 241 pages.


“Solomon Mathews Land Sale to Francis Spann, Warren County, Georgia, 1805.”

Solomon Mathews appears in an abstracted transaction for selling land to Francis Spann dated 13 December 1805 that had been originally granted to William Mitchell. Witnesses to the transaction were Henry Brannen, Thomas Fontaine, and Solomon Lockett. Francis Spann was a son-in-law to John Bruton and Jennett Griffin Bruton. This abstract appears on page 230 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, pages 203-204.


Some California Fontaine Descendants.

Self-published by Diane Thys and Horry Frost Prioleau. This 50-page publication lists the 13 generations of the Fontaine family beginning with Jean de la Fontaine (1445-1525) following down to present-day descendants in California. Includes a bibliography, an index of names, and index of places. July 2011.


“Some Colonial Virginia Records.”

On March 17, 1692, a naturalization petition was filed on behalf of John Fountain, who is listed as having lived in the colony for at least 20 years. It is unknown who this John Fountain was, as he was in Virginia much earlier than the Fontaine Maury families. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 11, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1903. p. 156.


“Some Unpublished Letters of T. W. White to Lucien Minor.”

An article by David K. Jackson. Thomas W. White (1788-1843) was the founder and editor of The Southern Literary Messenger which was published for many years in Richmond. The article cites that White drew on the talents of such writers as Matthew Fontaine Maury for the magazine. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 17, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1936. p. 224.


A Son of Thunder: Patrick Henry and the American Republic.

Henry Mayer, Author. A good biography, particularly good on “The Parson’s Cause.” Published by the University Press of Virginia in Charlottesville and in London in 1988. 526 pages, indexed.


Sophie Bruce - Mathew F. Maury Marriage; He Was a Grandson of the Famous Maury.

Wilkins and Kate Pennington Bruce had five children, their third child, Sophie Bruce, married Mathew F. Maury of Richmond, grandson of the famous scientist [Matthew Fontaine Maury]. Included in the article “The Bruce Family” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 11, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in April 1904. pp. 441-442.


South Pacific Destroyer : The Battle for the Solomons from Savo Island to Vella Gulf.

Russell Sydnor Crenshaw, Jr., Author. Follows the experiences of the destroyer Maury, named for Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Annapolis, MD, by the Naval Institute Press in 1998. 283 pages, with bibliography and index.


“Specific Taxes 1780.”

John Fontaine is on a list as a purchaser of public grain from the Commissioners of the Specific Tax in Henry Country, Virginia, in August 1780. He purchased one bushel of barley and four of corn for £45. Included in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 1, No. 1, published in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1893. p. 334.


“Speed Family – Elizabeth Walker Fry Married Reverend Matthew Maury.”

A history of the descendants of John Speed (born 1552) of London. Elizabeth Walker Fry (born 1753), one of 12 children of Peachy Walker (born 1767) and Joshua Fry, married the Reverend Matthew Maury of Fredericksburg Parish, Virginia. Published in George Norbury MacKenzie’s book, Colonial Families of the United States of America, in which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families who Settled in the American Colonies from the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April 1775, Volume 6, originally published in Baltimore in 1917, reprinted in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. p. 16.


New! The State of State History of Tennessee in 2012: Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury and Tennessee.

Walter T. Durham, State Historian. This was Mr. Durham’s final book that is available on-line. Published in Nashville by the Tennessee State Library and Archives in 2012. 112 pages, with bibliography and index.


The Statesmen of America in 1846.

Sarah Mytton Hughes Maury, Author. Wife of William Maury and daughter-in-law to James Maury, U.S. Consul General in Liverpool, provided many insights into the lives of Maurys, mostly the family of her father-in-law, as well as into the issues and American leaders of the period. Published in Philadelphia by Carey & Hart in 1847. 261 pages.


Steam-Lanes Across the Atlantic.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Originally appeared in Maury’s 7th edition of Explanations and Sailing Directions to Accompany Wind and Current Charts published in 1855. Published in Washington, D.C., by the Government Printing Office in 1872. 19 pages.


The Story of Gabriel and Marie Maupin: Huguenot Refugees to Virginia in 1700.

Dorothy Maupin Shaffett, Author. A good history of the Maupin family, particularly Gabriel Maupin, 1664-1720, and the Huguenots of Virginia. Includes a bibliography and index. Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press. 1993. 468 pages.


The Story of Huguenot’s Sword, Derived from Authentic Papers and Traditions. A Relic.

This article is a verbatim report made for Nelson Thomasson of Chicago on August 2, 1929. Thomasson’s grandfather was a Dupuy. It provides a history of the Huguenot movement and of the Fontaine and Depew families. The original article was published in Harper’s monthly magazine in April 1857. 14 pages, includes notes in the manuscript. Original available at the Library of Virginia in Richmond.


Stub Entry to Indent for Mrs. Jemima Fountain [Fontaine], 7 May 1785

“Issued the 7th, of May 1785, to Mrs. Jemima Fountain, for Fifteen Pounds, 7s / 2d 1/4 for Provis. & Forage for Contl. & Militia Use in 1781, 1782, & 1783. [illegible symbol]., Account audited.

Principal £15,7,2 1/4 Annual Interest £1,1,6” Jemima was the widow of Francis Fontaine III.

Transcription of entry no. 92, “Liber Q,” in Stubs Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims Against South Carolina Growing Out of the Revolution, edited by A. S. Salley, Jr., Editor, Secretary of the Historical Commission of South Carolina, Books O-Q, printed by The State Company, Columbia, S.C. 1915, p. 229.


“Students in 1754 at William and Mary College.”

This article includes a list of students who owed fees on Lady Day (March 25) 1754. Among the students on the list were John and Peter Whiting, and Charles [Mynn] Thruston. Js. Fontaine is listed as a scholar. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1898. p. 188.


Studies in the French Renaissance.

Arthur Augustus Tilley, Author. Volume 11 includes pamphlets on the French religious wars. Cambridge, UK: The University Press. 1922. 331 pages.


Suit by Executors of the Will of Christopher de Graffenriedt against Rev. Peter Fontaine, April 1746.

A suit by the executors of the will of Christopher de Graffenriedt versus Reverend Peter Fontaine listed in April 1746. An article, “Notes from the Records of Charles City County: Order Books,”

published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 22, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in October 1914. p. 435.


Summary of the Contributions of the Southerner Matthew Fontaine Maury.

Matthew F. [Fontaine] Maury gave the first complete description of the Gulf stream, marked out the first specific routes to be followed in crossing the Atlantic, first instituted the system of deep-sea sounding, first suggested the establishment of telegraphic communication between the continents by cable on the seafloor, indicated the line along which the existing cable was laid, and originated the plan for splicing the cable in mid-ocean. “The South’s Contribution to History,” taken from a 1891 pamphlet by T. K. Oglesby of Montgomery, Alabama, entitled The Britannica Answered and the South Vindicated, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 16, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1907. p. 114.


Sumner, Fountain, May Families of Southeast Georgia.

Doris West Walker, Author. Traces the family of Jonathan Fountain, born ca. 1806 in Georgia, and his wife Courtney Voss, in Jefferson County, Georgia. Possible Fontaine connections. Self-published in 1998 in Jonesboro, Georgia.


“Les Supplicies Huguenots au 16ieme Siècle a Valenciennes [Tortured Huguenots in the 16th Century in Valenciennes”

Article by Pierre Tonnerre published in Nord Genealogie: Bulletin du Groupement Genealogique de la Region du Nord, Volume 31, published in 1978, pp. 71-76. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Support for William Winston Fontaine’s Analysis of the Origins of Colonel Augustine Moore.

Junkin writes to refute the challenges published in Vol. 16, No. 2, by Charles Browning in which Browning noted what he alleges were errors in Colonel William Winston Fontaine’s analysis of the origins of Colonel Augustine Moore. “Colonel Augustine Moore, of ‘Chelsea,’ King William Co., Va” contributed by Francis T. A. Junkin, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 17, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1908. pp. 49, 51.


“The Surrender of York.”

Colonel William Fontaine, Author. Reprint of a letter written by Colonel Fontaine on October 26, 1781, in which he provides a detailed account of the surrender of the British at Yorktown. Mentions that he is going to Europe as soon as he can arrange passage, and will likely need to go by way of the West Indies. Sends his love to his sisters Sarah and Mary and their families. He mentions enclosing two yards of ribbon for each of them and for little Bess, if Mary was absent. Published in The Virginia Historical Register and Literary Advertiser, Volume 2, Number 1, in Richmond, VA, by MacFarlane & Fergusson, Printers, in 1849. pp. 34-37.


“Survey for John Hill in Franklin County, Georgia, Bordering J. Fountain; 1784.”

A survey appears for John Hill for 287½ acres in Franklin County, Georgia, bounded in the east by J. Fountain and the other sides vacant, cut by the Broad River, recorded as survey 22 taken on 17 December 1784, page. 13 of the Surveyor General’s Book “F.” This appears in Lucian Lamar Knight’s article, “The Le Conte List. Bounty Surveys Recorded By the Surveyor General and Preserved in the Office of the Secretary of State, Atlanta, Ga. Copied 1911, by Wm. L. Le Conte and Presented to the State” and published in Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution: Containing a List of the State’s Defenders, Officers and Men; Soldiers and Sailors, Partisans and Regulars, Whether Enlisted from Georgia or Settled in Georgia After the Close of Hostilities, in 1967 in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., pp. 198-312.


“Susannah Wheeler and John Greeson Sr. Land Sale to Lucy Thompson Sr., Lucy Thompson Jr. and Alexander Thompson, Warren County, Georgia, 1804.”

There are five Fontaine-related transactions recorded consecutively in the Warren County records. The second was for Susannah Wheeler and John Greeson Sr. to sell land originally granted to George Palmore to Lucy Thompson Sr., Lucy Thompson Jr., and Alexander Thompson dated 6 February 1804. This was Lucy Fontaine Thomson (1755-1813)(sister to Thomas Fontaine) and her husband Alexander Thomson and their daughter Lucy Thomson (1783-1871). Adjoining landowners identified are Berry Chapman and James Wheeler. Witnesses to the transaction were Thomas Fontain and Josias Wright. This appears in an abstracted list on page 209 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, pages 399-401.


A Tale of Two Villages: Huguenot Settlements in Colonial New York.

Corrine Roe, Author. A thesis submitted to the faculty of the Masters of Liberal Arts program of Stanford University. 1998.


“A Tarnished Legacy Revisited: Jean Pierre Purry and the Settlement of the Southern Frontier, 1718-1736.”

Arlin C. Migliazzo, Author. Article in the South Carolina Historical Magazine, Volume 92, No. 4, October 1991, pp. 232-252. Article identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Terrell Genealogy.

Emma Dicken, Author. The Terrells and Fontaines were neighbors in Virginia and intermarried. Published in San Antonio, TX, by the Naylor Co. in 1952.


Theology, Politics, and Letters at the Crossroads of European Civilization: Jaques Basnage and the Baylean Huguenot Refugees in the Dutch Republic.

Gerald Cerny, Author, as a thesis for a Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley. Includes bibliography and index. Dardrecht, Boston, and Lancaster: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. 1987. 354 pages.


Thomas Clay Appointed to a Foundation in the Room of Walker Maury, William and Mary College, March 1773.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on March 23, 1773, it was resolved that Thomas Clay be appointed to a Notaway Foundation in the room of Mr. Walker Mauray [Maury], elected a Student. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Henley, and Mr. Gwatkin, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1905. p. 27.


“Thomas Fontaine, Francis Rusher, and James Threewitts land sale to Turner Persons, Warren County, Georgia, 1801.”

Thomas Fontaine, Francis Rusher (probably Risher), and James Threewitts are listed in an abstract as selling land to Turner Persons. Adjoining landowners listed are Charles Darnell and Wormley Rose, with Solomon Slater as a witness to the transaction. Francis Risher was Thomas Fontaine’s nephew, son of Mary Fontaine (1753-1814) and Benjamin Risher (1752-1812), and James Threewitts was a nephew-in-law, husband of Sarah Fontaine and son-in-law of Thomas’s brother whose name is confused, either Peter or Benjamin Fontaine who was supposedly married to Mary Bruton. This appears on page 200 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book B, page 188.


“Thomas Fontaine Married Sally Threewit; Warren County, Georgia, 1797.”

Thomas Fontaine and Sally Threewit are listed as married on 2 February 1797 in Warren County, Georgia. Thomas Fontaine (1752-1808) was a son of Francis Fontaine, Jr., and Mary Glenisson. Sally was his second wife, his first wife is believed to have been Clarissa Bruton. This entry appears on p. 45 of Frances T. Ingmire’s book, Colonial Georgia Marriage Records from 1760-1810, self-published by the author in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1985.


Thomas Fountain on List of Warren County, Georgia, Slave Owners, 1798.”

Thomas Fontaine is on a list of 1798 slave owners in the lower subdivision of Warren County, Georgia. This list contains the companies of Capt. William Chapman Abercrombies, Capt. John Hatchers and Capt. Joday Newsome’s. Fountain is listed with 14 slaves, eight that are exempt from taxation by the laws of the state or by disability; the others are taxable. Appears on page 22 of Nathan Mathews’ article, “Particular List of Slaves - 1798 Warren County, Georgia,” in the Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 41, Number 1, Spring 2005, published in Jasper, Georgia, by Penpoint Newsletters.

 

Updated! “Thomas Fontaine Purchase of Land from Wyatt Bonner in Warren County, Georgia, 1798.”

Thomas Fontaine bought 200 acres from Wyatt Bonner and his wife Anne in Warren County for $400 on 2 January 1798. The land was originally granted to Mary McDonald, Aley McDonald, and Darling McDonald, in what was Wilkes County. The sale was witnessed by Jones Bonner and L. Franklin, recorded on 29 January 1799 by J. Tucker, clerk. The entry states that the record was transferred to Book A page 479. This indenture appears on pp. 278-279 in Warren County, State of Georgia, Superior Court, Deeds & Mortgages 1797-1799 Book D, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0295852, reviewed on 29 September 2012 by Brian H. Nilsson.


“Thomas Fontaine Will in Warren County, Georgia.”

Thomas Fontaine’s will is listed in an abstract of Warren County’s First Will Book, covering 1793-1810. This appears on page 135 of Historical Collections of the Joseph Habersham Chapter DAR, Volume III, published in Atlanta by Charles P. Byrd, State Printer, in 1910.


New! Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power.

Jon Meacham, Author. Meacham mentions Jefferson’s boyhood teacher, Reverend James Maury. Published in 2012 by Random House in New York, 759 pages, with bibliography and index.


Thomas W. Maury mentioned in Letter dated April 28, 1798, in Williamsburg.

In a letter by James M. Morris written in Williamsburg on April 28, 1798, to David Watson, he reports that “Tom Maury goes on much after the old sort. . . .” This is Thomas W. Maury. Continuation of “Letters from William and Mary 1795-1799,” from the originals in the Collection of Mr. Thomas S. Watson, Third Installment, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 30, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1922. p. 243.


Thomas W. Maury mentioned in Two Letters in 1797; Footnote Provides Brief Biography.

In a letter from Robert Michie written to David Watson from William & Mary on November 3, 1797, he mentions Tom Maury who had “taken stage at Fdgs. [Fredericksburg] for Alexandria to be innoculated but the Corporation having made a law that no one should be permitted except he could produce a certificate of three years residence; has sent him to us again.” In a footnote in the article, it explains that Thomas W. Maury of Louisa County received his B.A. from William & Mary in 1798. He was the son of Rev. Matthew Maury (b. 1744) and Elizabeth Walker. He represented Albemarle County in the House of Delegates 1815-1816 and again 1817-1818. The footnote further says that he had a school in Charlottesville for many years and died in 1842. A speech by Maury is mentioned by Michie in another letter to David Watson dated December 21, 1797, also written from William & Mary. “Letters to David Watson” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 29, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1921. p. 258.


“The Thornton Family.”

W. G. Stanard, Author. Mildred Washington Thornton, daughter of Francis Thornton and Ann Thompson, married Colonel Abraham Maury of Madison County. In his will, dated February 13, 1794, and proved in Spotsylvania on April 8, 1795, Francis Thornton left his daughter, Mildred Washington Maury, £100 in specie. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 5, No. 1, in Richmond by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1896. p. 55.


“Thruston Family.”

Eliza Sydnor Cosby was the eldest daughter of Judge Fontunatus Cosby and Mary Anne Fontaine. Eliza was married in September 1818 with Charles Mynn Thruston, second son of Colonel John Thruston and Elizabeth Thruston Whiting. Eliza died on January 27, 1841. Mary Anne Fontaine Cosby was one of nine daughters of Captain Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell Fontaine of Virginia. Aaron was one of the younger sons of Peter Fontaine, 40 year rector of Westover Parish in Virginia. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1897. pp. 13, 14.


“The Thruston Family of Virginia.”

Elizabeth Thruston Whiting, daughter of Elizabeth Thruston and Colonel Thomas Whiting of Gloucester County, Virginia, married her first cousin, Colonel John Thruston. After his death, in 1802, she married Captain Aaron Fontaine of Louisville, Kentucky. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 4, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1896. pp. 182-183.


To Make This Land Our Own: Community Identity and Social Adaptation inn Purrysburg Township, South Carolina, 1732-1865.

Arlin C. Migliazzo, Author. Published in 2007 in Columbia, S.C., by the University of South Carolina Press. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Tombstone Inscription for Catherine Maury, died 1791, Buried in Fredericksburg.

An inscription in Fredericksburg for Catharine Maury exists only as a fragment and reads:


“. . . Body of CATHARINE

. . . Wife of James Maury

. . . iverpool in the 22nd of May 1791

. . . living it was her Purpose

. . . returned & died among

. . . her own people

While dying she desired that these remains

Should rest here.

She was the best of Women.”


“Inscriptions of Some Old Tombstones,” copied by Dr. Joseph Lyon Miller, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 10, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1901. p. 109.


Tracing Your Huguenot Ancestors: A Guide for Family Historians.

Kathy Chater, Author. Published in Barnsley, United Kingdom, by Penn and Sword Family History in 2012. Book identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Tracks in the Sea: Matthew Fontaine Maury and the Mapping of the Oceans.

Chester G. Hearn, Author. History of how geographer Matthew Maury charted maritime navigation. Published in Camden, ME, by International Marine/McGraw Hill in 2002. Includes bibliography and index. 278 pages.


The Trail of the Huguenots.

George Elmore Reaman, Author. This 2009 reprint of the 1963 edition deals with the Huguenots and their descendants in Canada and the United States, with a focus on those in New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia as well as New England. It is included on Huguenot Settlers in America, 1600s-1900s, published as a CD on Family Archives GPC7600 with a name and text searchable index. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


The Trail of the Huguenots in Europe, the United States, South Africa and Canada.

George Elmore Reaman, Author. First published in Toronto in 1963. Published in Baltimore by the Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1966. 318 pages.


The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790.

Rhys Isaac, Author, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History. An in-depth study of Virginia history at a time when the Fontaine and Maury families had an impact. Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, VA, by the University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill, NC, in 1982. 451 pages.


Travels of Dr. Thomas Walker to Kentucky, References ‘Memoirs of a Huguenot Family.’

Mentions Dr. Thomas Walker of Albemarle County, Virginia, who had just returned from Kentucky. In the footnote, it cites details of Walker’s travels reported in James Maury’s Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, p. 391. Another footnote cites Fontaine’s book again in which he mentions that he had a copy of Daniel Coxe’s Carolana. Article by Fairfax Harrison, “The Virginians on the Ohio and the Mississippi in 1742,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 30, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in April 1922. pp. 206, 215.


“Trustees of Hampton-Sidney College, Includes Colonel John Fontaine, 1791-1792.”

Professor J. B. Henneman, Author. Article chronicles the history of the trustees of this Prince Edward County, VA, college. Colonel John Fontaine was a trustee in 1791-1792. He was the son-in-law of Patrick Henry, an earlier trustee of the college. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 6, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1898. p. 178.


“Tunstall Family - Mary Walker Married James Maury.”

In this article on the Tunstall family, it cites that Ann Hill married Jas. (?) Walker, who was a brother of Dr. Thomas Walker. They had two children, one being Mary Walker, who married James Maury (1717-1769). Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 16, Number 1, published in Richmond, VA, in July 1934. p. 32.


Turner Christian Marries a Fontaine.

William Christian’s son, Turner Christian, married three times: (1) Susan Walker; (2) Miss Fontaine; and (3) Polly Dancy. He had children with his first and third wife; he had no children with Miss Fontaine. No dates are given but from others listed in the articles, this was in the early to mid-1700s. Continuation article, “Christian Family - Descendants of William Christian,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 8, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1899. p. 126.


“Turner Family History, Includes Descendant of Valentine Tucker and Martha Fontaine.”

A history of the descendants of Thomas Turner who settled in Pennsylvania from Ireland. Robert Nelson (b. 1880) married in 1905 with Martha Turner Tucker. She was a great-great-granddaughter of Valentine Tucker and Martha Fontaine of Powhatan County, Virginia. Valentine Tucker was a land and slave owner.


Turff & Twigg: The French Lands

Priscilla Harriss Cabell, Author. History of French Huguenots in Virginia in the 18th century. Includes bibliography and index. Volume I. Richmond, VA: Carter Printing Company. 1988.


“The Ultra Montane Expedition.”

This article is a summary of John Fontaine’s journal description of Governor Spotswood’s expedition to the Blue Ridge. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 7, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1898. pp. 30-33.


Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West.

Stephen E. Ambrose, Author. Rev. James Maury and his school are included as part of Ambrose’s discussion of Lewis’s education in the 1780s. Published in New York by Simon & Schuster in 1996. 511 pages, indexed, bibliography.


U.S. Naval Observatory Records, 1830-1900.

8,000 items in 29 containers in the Library of Congress/Archives Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C. Includes all official correspondence and administrative records of the Washington offices of the Observatory, including those of the Superintendent, Nautical Almanac, Librarian, and the Superintendent of Compasses and Instruments, concerning the various activities of the observatory and tracing its development from its origin in the Depot of Charts and Instruments, U.S. Navy Dept. Principal topics include the acquisition, maintenance, testing, and distribution of instruments and charts, the distribution of observatory publications, the eclipse expeditions of 1860, 1869, and 1878, the Centennial Exhibition of 1876, astronomical observations and computations, and experiments to measure the velocity of light. Includes correspondence of Matthew Fontaine Maury (1806-1873), Superintendent (1842-1855, 1858-1861), with ship captains who collected data on ocean winds and currents from which navigation charts were assembled. Maury’s correspondence with George Manning reflects his interest in Atlantic soundings, an Atlantic telegraph cable, trade on the Amazon and other South American rivers, and an expedition to the Arctic by Henry Grinnell. Naval Historical Foundation deposited these records in the Library in 1951. These records were converted to gift to the Library in 1998.


“The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750.”

Colonel Richard L. Maury of Richmond wrote the introduction of this article, which provides a history of the Huguenot colony at Manakin town. Maury mentions that he is fifth in descent from Abraham Maury of Castel Moron and eighth in descent from Jean de la Fontaine of Le Mans. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 11, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1903. p. 293.


“The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750 [continued].”

Mentions that Reverend Mr. Finney may have performed spiritual offices in the parish as early as 1716. Together with the Fontaines, he served the parish from time to time until after August 7, 1724. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 12, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1904. p. 26.


“The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750 [continued].”

In the expense account of the Parish of King William, Reverend Francis Fontaine was owed £10.0.0, as recorded on September 3, 1720. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 12, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1905. p. 244.


Virginia: A Guide to the Old Dominion.

Writers’ Program, Work Projects Administration, Compilers. Includes a brief history of Merchant’s Hope Church and Rev. Peter Fontaine, p. 579. Description of Fontainebleau, home of Col. William Spotswood Fontaine, p. 589. Published in New York by the Oxford University Press in 1974. 699 pages, indexed.


“The Virginia Clergy: Governor Gooch’s Letters to the Bishop of London, 1727-1749, from the Fulham Manuscripts.”

In a letter from the Virginia governor to the Bishop, written in Williamsburg, VA, on June 29, 1729, he mentions that he thought it proper to send a minister with the many men who attend the commissioners and surveyors who were determining the dividing line between North Carolina and Virginia. Because the people in those border areas did not have a clergyman, the minister, Rev. Peter Fontaine, reported that he had christened about 100 children, many adults, and preached to a number of people who had never before heard a sermon. A footnote cites that Rev. Peter Fontaine, a Huguenot, was minister of Westover Parish, Charles City County, from 1716 until his death in 1757. He received the King’s bounty on March 30, 1716. The footnote cites the book Cradle of the Republic as the source of the Fontaine information. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 32, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in July 1924. pp. 228, 254.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753.”

Information found in Volume 605-1418 in the Public Record Office in London. Cites that no copy of Colonel William Byrd’s will is known to exist. The only known reference to it is in one of the few remaining Charles City County record books dated March 1744, which states that his will was presented by Mrs. Maria Byrd, first of the executors, and proved by the oaths of William Proctor and William Stith, two of the witnesses who swore that they saw the other witness, Peter Fontaine, sign the will. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 32, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in January 1924. p. 24.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

Minutes from the council meeting of June 13, 1728, cites the petition of Stephen Chastain for 800 acres in St. James Parish, in Goochland County, on the upper Manakin Creek that was surveyed by Peter Fontaine, Clerk, about six years earlier [around 1722] but never recorded. The minutes also cite a petition by John Fitzgerald setting forth that about eight years earlier [around 1720], there were three parcels of land surveyed, one of which was a tract of 185 acres on the south side of Fontaine’s Creek in Brunswick County. In the notes at the end of the minutes, it states that Rev. Peter Fontaine [involved in the Stephen Chastain property claim], B.A., was born in 1691 and died in July 1757. He emigrated to Virginia in 1716, was minister of King William and Westover parishes, and was chaplain to the Virginia Commission which ran the boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 33, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in January 1925. pp. 21, 22, 43.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

At the council meeting of December 11, 1728, the board read the petition of Stephen Chastain for 800 acres surveyed about six years ago [around 1722] by Peter Fontaine, Clerk, in St. James Parish between the lands of Peter Dutoy and Francis Dupuy in the great fork of upper Manakin Creek, then Henrico, now Goochland County. Fontaine never sought a patent for the land after it was surveyed. The petitioner gave Fontaine timely notice of the board hearing but Fontaine failed to appear, so the board ordered that the petitioner be granted a patent for the land. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 32, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1925. p. 393.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

In the council meeting minutes from June 12, 1729, the minutes note that in its December 11, 1728, meeting, the board decided to patent 800 acres to Stephen Chastain, land previously surveyed for Peter Fontaine, Clerk, but Fontaine’s claim defaulted because he never sought the patent. It appeared to the board that Fontaine, while the dispute was pending, procured surveys of the land to put in the Secretary’s office and had clandestinely obtained patents to be signed for the property. Because Stephen Chastain entered his Caveats before Fontaine’s patents were sealed and recorded, and made the truth of the matter appear before the board, the board ordered that the said patents surreptitiously prepared and signed for Fontaine be cancelled and that a patent for the land be granted to Stephen Chastain. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 34, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in July 1926. p. 209.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

Mentions that Edmund Berkeley’s daughter, Alice, married a Mr. Fontaine. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 35, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in January 1927. p. 39.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

According to the minutes to the council meeting of April 30, 1730, the governor appointed Rev. James Fontaine as sheriff of King William County. In the notes to the article, it states that this James must have been the son of Rev. James Fontaine who escaped from France. The younger James was born in 1686, married in Ireland, and arrived in Virginia in October 1717. It lists his six children: Elizabeth; Lucretia; James m. Ann Fontaine; Jane; John; and Anne m. Thomas Owen. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 35, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1927. pp. 405, 415.


“Virginia Council Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

At the April 24, 1731, council meeting, Rev. James Fontaine was nominated and appointed by the governor as sheriff of King William County. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 37, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in April 1929. p. 125.


“Virginia Colonial Journals 1726-1753 [continued].”

In the notes to this article, it states that this James must have been the son of Rev. James Fontaine who escaped from France. The younger James was born in 1686, married in Ireland, and arrived in Virginia in October 1717. It lists his six children: Elizabeth; Lucretia; James m. Ann Fontaine; Jane; John; and Anne m. Thomas Owen. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 38, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1930. pp. 363-364.


“Virginia First.”

Reprint of an article originally published by the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia in October 1921. References significant contributions made by Virginians in the arts, science, and history. Matthew Fontaine Maury is cited as revolutionizing ocean navigation. He furnished the plans for the laying of the Atlantic cable, and was the father of the modern science of torpedo and mine laying. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 3, Number 4, published in Richmond, VA, in April 1922. p. 237.


“Virginia Gleanings in England from the Public Record Office, London.”

Reginald M. Glencross, Compiler and Author. Mentions letters found by the late Colonel William W. Fontaine before the Civil War between members of the early Aylett family in Virginia that have since been lost. There was some question of the authenticity of the letters and thus the accuracy of the family relations in the early Aylett family in colonial Virginia. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 31, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1923. p. 321.


Virginia Governor Westmoreland Davis Proclamation of Feb. 1, 1922, for ‘Matthew Fontaine Maury Monument Day.’

In Part V - Calendar of Proclamations and Appeals of Westmoreland Davis, War Governor of Virginia, February 1, 1918, to February 1, 1922, No. 65 was “Matthew Fontaine Maury Monument Day” issued February 1, 1922. He asked that Virginians contribute to the memorial for Maury. Included in the “Virginia War History Commission Supplement No. 4 - List and Calendars of Source Material,” collected for the Virginia War Archives, published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 29, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, in October 1921. p. 496.


Virginia Heraldica - A Registry of Virginia Gentry Entitled to Coat Armour.

William Armstrong Crozier, Author and Compiler. Includes the coat of arms attributed to the Virginia branches of the Fontaine family. Published in Baltimore, MD, by the Southern Book Co. in 1953. p. 90.


“Virginia Legislative Papers.”

Colonel William Winston Fontaine of Austin, Texas, provided a table of Acts passed by the Virginia Assembly for use in this article. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 14, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in April 1907. p. 410.


“Virginia Legislative Papers [continued].”

On April 4, 1776, Reverend James M. Fontaine, Warner Lewis Jr., and Jonathan Peyton sent a letter to the President of the Committee of Safety in Williamsburg with the proceedings of the court of commissioners against John Wilkie of Gloucester. Wilkie was found guilty of providing intelligence to the enemy and going on-board a British man-of-war. The commissioners had ordered the seizing of Wilkie’s estate, which included a ship. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 15, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1908. p. 292.


“Virginia Militia in the Revolution.”

This lists the names of soldiers who served in the Revolution, predominantly from Augusta County, Virginia. Captain Fontaine is included on this list. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 7, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1899. p. 26.


“Virginia Names Spelt One Way and Called Another.”

This article includes Fontaine, often pronounced “Fountin,” and Maury, often pronounced “Murry.” Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 3, No. 4, in Williamsburg, VA, by the college in April 1895. p. 272.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution.”

On November 1, 1775, £5 cash was paid to Edwin Gray for David Allen for a rifle furnished to Captain [William] Fontaine’s Company. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 26, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in January 1918. p. 64.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution [continued].”

On November 13, 1775, £4 cash paid to William Fontain for a gun purchased of John Loving for the public. On November 23 [previously listed Nov. “22” which was incorrect], 1775, £5.10 s. paid to Mathew Jouet for a gun furnished to Captain Fontain’s Company. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 26, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in April 1918. pp. 183, 187.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution [continued].”

On November 14, 1775, £8.12.6 paid to George Gilmour for Micajah Chiles for leather breeches furnished to Captain Fountain’s Company. Also paid George Gilmour £5 for a rifle furnished to Captain Fountain’s Company. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 26, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in July 1918. p. 291.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution [continued].”

On January 8, 1776, £144.18.10 cash paid to Alexander Sinclair for Mr. Hughes’ accounts and expenses in recruiting for Captain Fontain’s Company. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 26, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in October 1918. p. 400.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution [continued].”

On January 10, 1776, £4.15.0 paid Thomas Walker for a rifle furnished to public for Captain Fontaine’s Company. On January 17, 1776, £5 paid Matt Jowett for William Henderson a rifle to Captain Fountain’s Company. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 27, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in January 1919. pp. 63, 65.


“Virginia State Troops in the Revolution [continued].”

On April 25, 1776, £1 paid to John Marks for Captain [William] Fontaine for his expenses in advertising a stolen rifle belonging to the public. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 32, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Old Dominion Press, Printers, in October 1924. p. 360.


“Virginia’s Soldiers in the Revolution.”

Summarizes that the Convention Guards Regiment was raised to guard British troops captured at Saratoga during their detention in Virginia. 600 men were raised, they enlisted for one year. The officers were appointed by Virginia authorities. The regiment appears to have served from January 1779 through June 5, 1781, when it was discharged. Major William Fontaine is listed in the regiment, from December 24, 1778, through May 1, 1779, and again as Lieutenant Colonel William Fontaine from March 5, 1779, through June 15, 1781. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 21, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1913. p. 345.


Walker Maury Advertised for His Grammar School in Orange Co., VA, in 1780.”

In 1780 Walker Maury advertised in the Virginia Gazette his grammar school for Orange County for instruction in Latin, Greek, and English. Part II of an article, “Education in Colonial Virginia: Private Schools and Tutors,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 6, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1897. p. 6. Printed again in the article “Notes from the ‘Virginia Gazette’ for 1780,” Volume 3, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1922. p. 219.


Walker Maury Appointed a Scholar on a Nottaway Foundation in Mr. Marshall’s Room, William and Mary College, November 1770.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on November 22, 1770, it was unanimously resolved that Mr. Walker Maury be appointed a scholar on a Nottaway Foundation in the room of Mr. Marshall. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Horrocks, President, and Mr. Camm, Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Henley, and Mr. Gwatkin, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in January 1905. p. 155.


Walker Maury Awarded Botetourt Gold Medal for Excellence in the Classics at William & Mary, 1774.

Lord Botetourt, when governor, awarded two gold medals – one for excellence in mathematics and one for excellence in the classics – for four years as prizes for students of William and Mary College. For the gold medal award for the classics, it was awarded in 1772 to James Madison, in 1773 to Samuel Shield, in 1774 to Walker Maury, and in 1775 to Thomas Evans. “The Botetour Prize Medals,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 3, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, in October 1894. p. 144.


Walker Maury Reprimanded for Beating on a Master’s Door After Too Much Liquor, William and Mary College, May 1774.

At meetings of the President and Masters on May 17 and 18, 1775, they convened to make an enquiry about a noise made on the night of May 1 when someone violently beat the door of Mr. Gwatkin with the apparent intent to break in and cause further mischief. A search was conducted, and it was determined on May 18 that the ushers were to blame for spending a late evening in a tavern with several students who had no leave of absence and did not take care of one student who “was in Liquor” to see that he was quietly taken to his room. The meeting resolved that Mr. [Fontaine] Maury was the “sole Actor in the unreasonable disturbance” and that it was a single act of intemperance on his part and he otherwise has had good behavior. It was agreed that Mr. Maury make the following acknowledgment:


“Conscious of the impropriety of my behaviour towards Mr. Gwatkin the other Evening, I now acknowledge my sorrow for and utter Disapprobation of such Conduct. In the cool moments of Reflection I am full sensible of the Necessity of maintaining a due Subordination, a proper Obedience & Respect to my Superiours in a Collegiate Society. And I am at this time happy that my Conduct hereto (before?) this unfortunate Accident hath always manifested such sentiments. To such Conduct I attribute the Lenity of the present Decision; for which I have the most grateful Sense to the Society in general, & acknowledge particularly my Obligation to that Gentleman to whom the Insult was offer’d.”


Those present at the meetings were the Honorable and Reverend John Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Gwatkin, and Mr. Madison. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1906. p. 244.


Walker Maury Selected to Receive Medal for Classical Learning, William and Mary College, [undated] 1774.

At a meeting of the President and Masters [no date specified, prior to August 1774], it was agreed that the [Botetourt] medal assigned for the encouragement of classical learning be given to Mr. Walker Maury. Those present at the meeting were the Honorable and Reverend John Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Henley, Mr. Gwatkin, and Mr. Madison, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1906. p. 242.


Walker Maury To Be Moved to the Philosophy Schools after Christmas, William and Mary College, December 1772.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on December 12, 1772, it was resolved that Walker Maury, John Nelson, Burwell Starke, Emmanuel Jones, and William Yates be removed to the Philosophy Schools after Christmas. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson, and Mr. Gwatkin, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1905. pp. 25-26.


Walkers and Maurys.

Joseph Leidy of 233 South 13th St. Philadelphia, wrote a query seeking information on the ancestors of Miss Walker, wife of Rev. James Maury. He believes that she was the niece of Dr. Thomas Walker of Castle Hill. He also seeks the ancestry of Miss Grymes who married the Rev. Walker Maury. Query entitled “Walkers and Maurys” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 2, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in January 1895. p. 349.


“War Notes.”

Lieutenant Hugh L. Fontaine is included in an article reporting on the World War I service of Virginians. Lieutenant Fontaine of the 49th Aero Squadron (of Memphis, Tennessee) received the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action near Hagerville on September 14, 1918. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 27, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Mitchell & Hotchkiss, Printers, in January 1919. p. 96.


“Warren County, Georgia, Superior Court, October Term, 1820, Grand Jury List.”

John Fontaine appears on a grand juror list, as published in the October 31, 1820, issue of the Georgia Journal newspaper published in Milledgeville, Georgia. The following is from page 386 of Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 2: 1819-1823, published in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press in 1994. “Georgia, Warren County. Superior Court, October Term, 1820. The undersigned Grand Jurors. . . as a body invested with the authority of examining into the county funds, do recommend that John Torrence, Solomon Lockett, and Jack S. Davenport, be a committee appointed for the purpose. . . (Signed) Jeremiah Butt, Foreman. Arthur Jenkins, Thomas Maddox, James Pace, Archelus Butt, Benjamin Carr, Randol Johnson, Samuel Torrence, Samuel Barron, John Fontaine, James Gray Jr., James H. M’Farlin, Joshua Draper, Henry Brown, Robert Bonner, Lewis Parham, Joseph Ansley, Vincent Johnson, Thomas Lockett. A true copy from the minutes. (Signed) Thomas Gibson, Clerk.”


“‘Was Grant Magnanimous?’ an article by Colonel William Fontaine, 1933.”

In an editorial, the writer mentions Colonel [William] Fontaine’s account of the British surrender at Yorktown. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 15, Number 2, published in Richmond, VA, in October 1933. p. 103.


The Washington Map of the United States.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Maury prepared this map as part of the “Maps for an Emerging Nation” series. Published in Washington, D.C., by H. G. Bond, Publishers, in 1860. This single map is printed on two pages. Additional versions were published in later years. The 1860-1865, and 1868 issues are available in the Library of Congress collection.


Washington Wife: Journal of Ellen Maury Slayden 1897-1919.

Ellen Maury Slayden, Author. Fontaine and Maury descendant who was wife of Congressman James Luther Slayden of San Antonio. She kept a journal of her experiences in Washington society from 1897 to 1919. They were adamant anti-prohibitionists. Published in New York by Harper & Row, 1963. 385 pages.


Westover Church and Its Environ.

Caroline Kirkland Ruffin Saunders, Author. This is a history of Westover Church in Harrison District, Charles City County, VA, and includes information on Rev. Peter Fontaine. Published in Richmond, VA, by W. M. Brown, Printer, in 1937. 189 pages. Available at the Library of Congress collection.


“What Lies Before This Nation?”

An editorial by Sue Ruffin Taylor advocating that the United States should join the League of Nations. Cites that the United States once led the world in planning peace, such as American Matthew Fontaine Maury’s efforts that brought about the Brussels Conference in 1853. Published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 17, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1936. p. 144.


“Who Were the Huguenots?”

Article available on the National Huguenot Society webpage, accessed on 26 December 2015. Identified by Dr. Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., in his article, “A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina,” in the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, Volume 41, Number 4, published in November 2015, pp. 293-310.


Wilbur F. Peeler Confederate Soldier’s Pension Claim, Served in 15th Cavalry under Col. Harry Maury

Wilbur F. Peeler Soldier’s Pension Claim, A06216, filed 7/19/__, enlisted at Monticello, Florida, in July 1861 in Company H, 3rd Florida Infantry and served until honorably discharged at Tallahassee in May or June 1865. He further stated that he served one year in 3rd Florida Regiment and was then transferred to 15th Cavalry under command of Col. Harry Maury. Applicant was born in Thomas County, Georgia, 8/21/1843, and had resided in state since January 1852. J. H. Tucker and B. W. Partridge of Jefferson County, Florida, verified service of applicant. Pension was approved. These details provided by Mary Jane Weaver, Abstractor, in “Abstracts of Confederate Pension Applications of Soldiers in Columbia County, Florida,” Huxford Genealogical Society, Inc., Magazine, in Volume XXXV, Number 5, March 2008, pp. 22-29. The Peeler entry appears on p. 28 of the article.


“Will of Charles Howard, Craven County, North Carolina; 1754.”

The 1754 will of Charles Howard was witnessed by Frans Fontaine, William Arthur, and Ann Spinks. The will names Howard’s son Charles, daughters Sarah Brooks and Courtney Ives, son-in-law Jacob Hanbox (or Hancox), and granddaughter Sibbe Brooks. His wife Mary was his residuary legatee and executrix. This abstract published by J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State, in Abstract of North Carolina Wills, Compiled from Original and Recorded Wills in the Office of the Secretary of State, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., in 1967. Page number not noted.


“Will of Charves Cavena, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1756.”

John Fountaine is listed as a witness in the will of Charves Cavena, planter of Edgecombe County, signed on 9 April 1756. This appears in Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.’s book, Early Records of North Carolina, Volume III – Wills 1756-1794, published in 1992 in Keysville, Virginia, by the author.


“Will of Colonel William Byrd, Witnessed by Peter Fontaine, March 1744.”

In March 1744 the will of William Byrd was presented by Mrs. Maria Byrd, first of the executors, and proved by the oaths of William Proctor and William Stith, two of the witnesses who swore that they saw the other witness, Peter Fontaine, sign the will. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 9, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in July 1901. p. 82.


“Will of Elias DuPee, 14 August 1750, Craven County.”

Elias DuPee of New Bern, blacksmith, signed his will on 14 August 1750, witnessed by John Mill, Frans. Fontaine, and Jno. Foster. DuPee names his father Daniel as executor and son Daniel. Published by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., in his abstracts, Early Records of North Carolina, Volume VII – Wills 1750-1755, Keysville, VA, by the author in 1992.


“Will of Francis Fontaine, Minister of York Hampton Parish, Proven March 19, 1749.”

Francis Fontaine, “minister of York Hampton Parish in York County, Virginia.” Will proved in York County on March 19, 1749. He names his children, Francis, Jr., the eldest, whom he disinherits, Mary, John, Thomas, James Maury Fontaine, youngest son, to whom he gives all his books and manuscripts, and Judith Barber Fontaine. His wife was Susannah Fontaine. His books were contained in “one large book case, one small do, 1 double book case of black walnut.” Susannah Fontaine’s will was proved September 20, 1756. She names her son-in-law, John Fontaine, and daughter-in-law Mary Fontaine [presumably meaning “stepchildren”]; son James Maury Fontaine to have all the books, book cases, and family pictures, and daughter Judith Barber Fontaine to have “all my Virginia cloth curtains and counterpanes.” Her inventory was valued at £750.2.0½. “York County Records: Some Wills and Other Records,” published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 2, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1921. p. 204.


Will of James Maury Proved in Albemarle Co., Virginia, August 1769.

Lists that the will of James Maury was proved in August 1769 in Albemarle County, Virginia. Included in listing in “Notes from the Records of Albemarle County, Virginia,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 26, No. 3, in Richmond, VA, in July 1918. p. 318.


“Will of Joseph Wade, Orange Co., N.C., 1757.”

Joseph Wade signed his will on 3 January 1757 in Orange County and it was proven in the March Court 1757, he names among others his daughter Sarah Fountin. She is known to be the second wife of the Reverend Peter Fontaine (1691-1759). She and the Reverend Peter lived in Virginia although her parents had moved to North Carolina. Published by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., in his abstracts, Early Records of North Carolina, Volume VIII – Wills 1756-1794, Keysville, VA, by the author in 1992.


Will of the Rev. Peter Fontain[e].

Abstracts from the Charles City County, Virginia, Court Record Book 1754-1757, includes an entry for the Reverend Peter Fontaine, which reads as follows in the abstract: “p.494 [November Court 1757]: Will of the Rev. Peter Fontain, Clerk, presented by Sarah Fontain and Peter Fontain, two of the executors, and proved by John Sherman Gregory, Richard Riddlehurst and William Riddlehurst, with John Sherman Gregory and John Wayles security. James Bell, Richard Riddlehurst, John Riddlehurst and John Jacob Coonan Danzie to appraise.” Published by Benjamin B. Wiesiger’s book, Charles City County, Virginia Records, 1737-1774, with several 17th Century Fragments, self-published by the author in Richmond in 1986, page 131. The significance of the entry is that it clearly establishes that the Reverend Peter Fontaine died in 1757 and not in 1759, as frequently cited in published genealogies. Bibliographic entry courtesy of Randolph Currie.


William A. Maury Contribution to Saving the Virginia Historical Society Collection during 1860s.

The manuscripts and other items belonging to the Virginia Historical Society which had been housed in the Virginia State Library were moved and for a period time were taken care of by William A. Maury but were later taken to the home of Mr. T. H. Wynne, who had an available storage room. William Maury was one of the officers of the Society and member of the Executive Committee between 1860 and 1870. The collection had survived because it had been moved several times, with several buildings destroyed by fire at the end of the Civil War. Taken from an article by William G. Stanard, “The Homes of the Virginia Historical Society: Past, Present, and Future,” published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Bibliography, Volume 34, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, in January 1926. pp. 7-8.


“William Castleberry to Seaborn Ivy, Warren County, Georgia, 1803.”

William Castleberry appears in an abstracted transaction presumably for the sale of property to Seaborn Ivy dated 1 January 1803. John Fountain is listed but without identification of his role, he was likely a witness. The witness listed was John G. Winter. This abstract appears on page 280 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book X, pages 163 and 164.


“William Fontaine Obituary, October 12, 1810.”

William Fontaine’s obituary is cited as published in the Virginia Patriot on October 12, 1810. Published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 20, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by William Ellis Jones, Printer, in October 1912. p. 368.


William Fontaine Recommended to Succeed Augustine Tabb in a Foundation, William and Mary College, July 1772.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on July 27, 1772, it was resolved that Mr. William Fontaine be recommended to the Visitors to succeed Mr. Augustine Tabb in a Foundation. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Henley, and Mr. Gwatkin, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 13, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1905. p. 234.


William Fontaine Resignation from the Foundation, William and Mary College, October 1773.

At a meeting of the President and Masters on October 19, 1773, it was resolved unanimously that Mr. Thomas Evans be recommended to the Visitors for the Foundation vacant by the resignation of Mr. William Fontaine. Those present at the meeting were Reverend Camm, President, and Mr. Jones, Mr. Dixon, Mr. Gwatkin, and Mr. Madison, Masters. Continuation article of “Journal of the Meetings of the President and Masters of William and Mary College,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 14, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1905. p. 30.


“William Fontaine Selected as Petit Juror, Montgomery County, Georgia, 1800.”

William Fontaine was one of the persons selected to serve on a petit jury in the Montgomery County, Georgia, Superior Court. He was selected in the November term 1800. Others selected include Jno. Burton [Bruton?] and Sans Standley [Sands Stanley], whose father was from Dobbs County, North Carolina, and knew the Brutons there. This information found in Montgomery County, Georgia, Court Records & Deeds, Miscellaneous Dates, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0159033, no page numbers.


“William Fountain Deed to Gideon Atays in Montgomery Co., Georgia, 1811.”

William Fountain appears in a Montgomery County, Georgia, deed index as conveying something to Gideon Atays on 15 February 1811 and recorded on 28 March 1811 in Deed Book H, page 126 75. This information found in Montgomery County, State of Georgia, Superior Court, General Index to Deeds & Mortgages, Grantors 1790-1889, on Family History Library Microfilm Room 0218747, no page numbers.


“William Fountain in Laurens County, Georgia, Inferior Court to Pay Toll for Gelding, 1818.”

William Fountain appears before Isaac Benton, Esq., for tolls on a 5 year old bay gelding in Laurens County, Georgia, Clerk’s Office of Inferior Court, no date given but presumed to be 1818. This appears in an abstract of the Tuesday, 31 March 1818, issue of the Georgia Journal on page 834 in Fred R. Hartz and Emilie Hartz’s book, Genealogical Abstracts from the ‘Georgia Journal’ (Milledgeville) Newspaper, 1809-1840, Volume 1: 1808-1818, published in 1994 in Vidalia, Georgia, by Gwendolyn Press.


“William Fountain Selected as Grand Juror, Montgomery County, Georgia, 1804.”

William Fountain was selected on 18 October 1804 as a grand juror in Montgomery County Court, with Judge Shrine. He is listed as #8. This information found in Montgomery County Georgia, Court Records & Deeds, Miscellaneous Dates, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0159033, no page numbers.


“William Fountain Selected as Grand Juror, Montgomery County, Georgia, 1807.”

William Fountain was selected on Friday, 10 April 1807, as a grand juror in Montgomery County Court. He is listed as #28. This information found in Montgomery County Georgia, Court Records & Deeds, Miscellaneous Dates, on Family History Library microfilm roll 0159033, no page numbers.


William Maury Fontaine, born to Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrell, January 16, 1793.

To Aaron Fontaine and Barbara Terrill was born a son, William Maury Fontaine, born January 16, 1793. Continuation of the article, “Register of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County,” published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 4, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in April 1907. p. 251.


William Winston Fontaine Submission of an 1848 Account of the Earliest Aylett in America.

Fontaine submitted an 1848 account of his first Aylett ancestor in America that was written by his uncle, General Philip Aylett (b. 1791), of Montville, King William County, Virginia, who received it from his father, Colonel Philip Aylett (b. 1767). “Aylett Family Tradition,” contributed by William Winston Fontaine, published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 2, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in October 1906. p. 99.


William Winston Fontaine Wrote About the Arms for the Aylett, Moore Families.

In the Historical and Genealogical Notes section, William Winston Fontaine of Galveston, Texas, wrote about the Aylett family arms and cited that the arms of Moore of Chelsea appear in Charles Campbell’s book, Genealogy of the Spotswood Family in Scotland and Virginia. Published in the William and Mary College Quarterly (1st series), Lyon G. Tyler, editor, Volume 15, No. 1, in Richmond, VA, by Whittet & Shepperson, General Printers, in July 1906. p. 34.


Wind and Current Charts.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Maritime and whaling maps and oceanography charts and diagrams. Published in Washington, D.C., by the U. S. Navy Department in 1848.


Windchart Maury Pilot Charts.

British Board of Trade. Includes wind and current charts prepared by Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in London by the British Board of Trade in 1855. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


The Winds at Sea; Their Mean Direction and Annual Average Duration from Each of the Four Quarters.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Nautical monographs published as part of a series. Published in Washington, D.C., in 1859. 8 pages. Available in the Library of Congress collection.


New! A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War.

Amanda Foreman, Author. Written by the daughter of Carl Foreman, author of Bridge Over the River Kwai and High Noon, Foreman discusses Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury’s role in England during the Civil War. She notes that he would have been a better Southern Commissioner to England and Europe than William Yancey or James Mason. She also mentions Commander William Lewis Maury, who sailed a ship named Japan that Matthew Fontaine Maury had obtained in Scotland, that William Lewis Maury renamed as the CSS Georgia. Published in New York by Random House in 2010, it is 958 pages and includes a bibliography and index.


The World We Live In.

Matthew Fontaine Maury, Author. Geography text book. Published in New York by the University Publishing Co. in 1868. Another edition published in 1871. 104 pages.


“Wormley Rose Land Sale to William Culpepper, Warren County, Georgia, 1811.”

Wormley Rose appears in an abstracted transaction for the sale of property to William Culpepper dated 12 September 1811. Adjoining landowners were Thomas Fountain, William Sanford, and Josiah Randle. Witnesses to the transaction were Eaton Flewellin and Alexander Gardner. This abstract appears on page 249 of “Deed Records – Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Warren County Courthouse; Warrenton, Georgia, 1794-1875,” compiled by Susan Shelton Montgomery, Tracy Rader and Sandra Norris, under the supervision of Martha Cason Poole, and published in Cemeteries and Genealogy: Warren County, Georgia and Immediate Vicinity 1792-1987, published in 1987 in Roswell, Georgia, by WH Wolfe Associates. The abstract cites that the original is from Book C, pages 589-590.


The Yankee Cheese Box.

Robert Stanley McCordock, Author. This book assesses the effect of the Merrimack and the Monitor on sea warfare. It includes some interesting insights on Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in Philadelphia by Dorrance & Co. in 1938. 470 pages. A favorable review of the book was published in Lyon G. Tyler’s Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 20, Number 3, published in Richmond, VA, in January 1939. p. 192.


Young People’s History of Virginia and Virginians.

Dabney Herndon Maury, Author. Richmond, VA: B. F. Johnson Publishing Co. 1896, reprinted in 1904. 246 pages.


Zones of Stars Observed at the National Observatory, Washington.

Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury, LL.D., Superintendent. Authorized by Captain G. A. Magruder, Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, and under the authority of the Honorable Isaac Toucey, Secretary of the Navy. Contains the zones observed with the meridian circle in 1846. Published in Washington, D.C., by G.W. Bowman, Printer, in 1846. p. 102.


Updated March 2016


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